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September 27, 2011

An ignominious end to Denis Avey’s fake story?

Filed under: Holocaust — furtherglory @ 8:55 am

In a comment on my blog, a reader provided a link to an April 2011 article on the Mail Online about the book written by Denis Avey.  I noticed this sentence near the end of the article:

Professor Kenneth Waltzer, the director of the Jewish Studies Program at Michigan State University and a world authority on the Nazi concentration camps, is sceptical: ‘The pattern of sustained silence, despite interviews, and then the tumbling out of the story does indeed raise suspicions.”

Ken Waltzer is on the case?  I predict that the end is near. The Denis Avey book will soon be categorized as a novel, like another fake Holocaust story that Professor Waltzer exposed: the one about the little girl throwing apples over the fence of a concentration camp.

The Mail Online article ends with this sentence:

As none other than the late Ernst Lobethal wrote to the New York Times in February 1994: ‘I think it is important to point out inaccuracies, lest Holocaust revisionists do it for us.’

I was one of the first to “point out inaccuracies” in the Denis Avey story.  Does that make me a “revisionist”?  There should be a new term for people who call attention to Holocaust lies.  Revisionist is a pejorative term when used by Holocaustians.

I blogged about Avey’s book several times, both before and after I read the book.  I wrote a review of the book here.

3 Comments

  1. Well, I’ve just read Avey’s account. I would say this; I’ve talked to many veteran’s over the years and the one thing that marks memory is inconsistency, both in timing and detail. They will sometimes swear something is absolutely true when in fact it did not happen the way they recall. What makes it true are the things they really get wrong sometimes – that’s because the mind reconstructs events subconsciously. I believe Avey’s account is true and it is the inconsistencies that make it compelling. So called ‘holocaust experts’ can only speak in generalities – they were not there. They claim to swap with an inmate would be very difficult; how do they know? It’s a matter of opinion and conjecture. Then they wheel out people of that generation to give their opinion; completely unsubstantiated opinion. I once gave a talk and recounted the story of two WW11 German POW s who stole a plane from Carlisle and tried to fly home. After the talk a retired lady and former servicewomen told me the story was completely untrue because she saw how tight security was on airfields. How wrong she was, because the story is absolutely true. You find accomplished liars do their research to try and fool people. Avey’s assertion that he saw an ‘Arbeit Mach Frei’ sign supposedly in the wrong place is something he could have easily avoided if he was lying. But memory is a cruel mistress and historians are too often full of their own confidence to listen and learn carefully. Inconsistency is the sign of a true story.

    Comment by David Price — June 12, 2012 @ 9:29 am

  2. It’s one thing to expose nobodies like Avey or Wilhelm Tell Rosenblatt; Wiesel is enthroned on the diamond-studded platinum Holympus.

    OTOH, I’ve heard Waltzer might soon publish a new Wiesel-related article; that would be the 3rd (third) in 5 years. Isn’t life sweet?

    PS:furtherglory, did you read your mail?

    Comment by Eager for Answers — September 27, 2011 @ 5:22 pm

  3. Kenneth Waltzer of the Jewish Studies program at Michigan State University is will soon be known as Professor “Pinocchio Waltzer” if
    he can’t come up with something to disprove Carolyn Yeager’s and Carlos Mottogano’s compelling evidence, based on Hungarian survivor Miklos Gruner’s claim, that Elie Wiesel is a cunning imposter. Imagine what would happen if an intelligent, generous, gentile oligarch or righteous Muslim oil sheik started endowing universities with Real History Studies programs. The civic cult of Holocaustianity would be out of business in a decade.

    Comment by who+dares+wings — September 27, 2011 @ 10:13 am


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