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January 26, 2013

January 27, 2013 is International Holocaust Remembrance Day

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 10:00 am

January 27, 2013 is the 68th anniversary of the official liberation of the three Auschwitz camps by the Soviet Union on January 27, 1945.  The German SS men, who ran the camp, had left on January 18, 1945, taking 60,000 prisoners with them on a “death march” out of the camp.

You can read all about Holocaust Remembrance Day here on a website, which includes a video about the Auschwitz Album, a book of photos that gives “visual evidence” of the mass murder at Auschwitz.

Still shot from a movie taken by the Soviets after Auschwitz was liberated

Still shot from a movie taken by the Soviets after Auschwitz was liberated

I previously blogged about International Holocaust Remembrance Day here and here.

Artwork at the entrance to the Auschwitz Museum

Artwork at the entrance to the Auschwitz Museum

The photo above was taken by me in 2005. The green arrow in the photo points to the exit door from the Auschwitz administration building.  The next thing that visitors see is the iconic sign “Arbeit Macht Frei” over the entrance to the Auschwitz I main camp.

Two tourists entering the Auschwitz main camp in 1998

Two tourists entering the Auschwitz main camp in 1998

Last year, a new record was set for the number of visitors to Auschwitz: over 1.4 million people visited the camp.  In 1998, when I first visited the Auschwitz complex, there were only a few visitors to the main camp. No one, besides me and my tour guide, was there when I toured the Auschwitz II (Birkenau) camp in 1998.  (Raul Hilberg wrote a three-volume set of books entitled The Destruction of the European Jews after touring only the main Auschwitz camp for half a day; he did not visit the Birkenau camp where the Jews were gassed.)

Recent photo of visitors leaving the Auschwitz main camp

Recent photo of visitors leaving the Auschwitz main camp which is now a Museum

Children marching out of the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp after they were liberated on Jan. 27, 1945

Children marching out of the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp after they were liberated by the Soviet Union on Jan. 27, 1945

The ruins of Krema III, one of the four gas chamber buildings at Auschwitz-Birkenau, are shown in the photo below.

Ruins of Krema III gas chamber building

Ruins of Krema III gas chamber building which was blown up on Jan. 20, 1945

There were 611 children in the Birkenau camp who stayed behind when the camp was evacuated on January 18, 1945. There were 4,428 women and girls and 169 boys who stayed behind when the Auschwitz-Birkenau complex was evacuated. Around 2,000 prisoners were left behind in the men’s camp at Birkenau; there were around 1250 men in the main camp who did not join the march out of the camp and 850 men, including famous survivor Primo Levi, who chose to stay behind at Monowitz.

According to Holocaust historian Danuta Czech, the evacuation of the three camps began in the early morning hours of January 18, 1945 when 500 women with children were escorted out of the Birkenau camp by SS guards. They reached Wodzislaw on January 21st. The men arrived the next day and all men, women and children were loaded onto open railroad cars and taken to Germany.

The prisoners at the Auschwitz III camp (Monowitz), and all the prisoners in the Auschwitz sub-camps, marched to the four concentration camps at Gleiwitz near the German border, arriving on January 21st. They were then taken on trains to the Buchenwald, Dachau, Sachsenhausen or Mauthausen camps in the Greater German Reich.

Old women who stayed behind when Auschwitz was evacuated

Women who stayed behind when Auschwitz was evacuated on Jan. 18, 1945

Jews waiting for the gas chamber at Auschwitz-Birkenau

Photo from Auschwitz Album shows Jews waiting for the gas chamber at Auschwitz-Birkenau

The Hungarian Jews, shown in the photo above, are looking toward the Sauna building, where there was a shower room.  Behind them are the clothing warehouse buildings, known as “Canada.” There were no showers for them; this photo is “visual evidence” that these Jews are waiting for the gas chamber in Krema IV (not shown), which is behind them, and to the left in the photo. Krema IV was blown up by the prisoners.

Child survivors leaving the barracks at Birkenau after the camp was liberated

Child survivors leaving the barracks at Birkenau after the camp was liberated

Each of the survivors in the photo above has a story to tell about how they beat the odds and were not chosen by Dr. Death (Dr. Josef Mengele) for the gas chamber.

5 Comments

  1. I am surprised you approved Pete’s comment. He or she seems to be saying that the western MSM is controlled by Jews. That could be seen to be an anti-Semitic comment.

    Comment by Ross — January 27, 2013 @ 9:57 am

    • I am not sure what MSM means. Does it mean the Main Stream Media? If so, I think that there is no question that the main stream media is dominated by Jews. Saying that the main stream media is controlled by Jews is considered by the Jews to be anti-Semitic, but we still have freedom of speech in America and it is not against the law to express an opinion. I know that the Jews deny that they control the main stream media. Non-Jews have a different opinion.

      Comment by furtherglory — January 28, 2013 @ 6:26 am

  2. January 27th is only one of the Holocaust memorial days; if you read the western MSM you will realize that every day is Holocaust Memorial day.

    Comment by Pete — January 26, 2013 @ 3:33 pm

    • January 24th was not Holocaust Day and yet I was moved to tears by the harrowing story of Harry Granville, born Heinz Greilsamer. He’s just stumbled on a picture of Auschwitz suitcases, one of them bearing the name of his father*.

      ‘It was a bit of a shock and my heart did miss several beats when I saw it for the first time.

      ‘This is the first evidence I have ever had that my mother, my father and my grandmother actually arrived at Auschwitz.

      ‘I have carried suspicions with me for a long time and now I have this evidence I feel justified in my suspicions.’

      Can you imagine the horror of discovering in 2013 that your parents were murdered in Auschwitz in 1944?

      . . . and forgetting you had written a testimony to Yad Vashem telling the exact same information in 1999.

      * Did all Jews throughout Europe buy the same model of suitcase ?

      Comment by Eager For Answers — January 27, 2013 @ 5:27 pm


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