Scrapbookpages Blog

March 16, 2014

11-year-old boy who was selected to be a Sonderkommando at Auschwitz

Filed under: Holocaust — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 4:53 pm

At Auschwitz, the Sonderkommando Jews were selected to work in the crematoria, carrying bodies out of the gas chamber, and shoving them into the cremation ovens.  But first, the Sonderkommando Jews had to pull the gold teeth out of the mouths of their fellow Jews, after they had been gassed.  (Shouldn’t they have pulled the gold teeth out BEFORE the Jews were gassed, and their bodies were contaminated with poison gas?)

Bodies of dead Jews were put onto a trolley before being shoved into the ovens at Auschwitz

Bodies of dead Jews were put onto a trolley before being shoved into the ovens at Auschwitz

Holocaust survivor Martin Becker was selected to be one of the Sonderkommando Jews, at the age of 11; he worked in this job for 5 years before he was marched out of the Auschwitz camp.

Martin Becker is still alive, at the age of 87, and he is out on the lecture circuit, telling his story, which you can read in full at http://www.thewrap.com/martin-becker-holocaust-survivor-waxword-column

Look at my photo above, taken at Auschwitz in 2005.  It shows the trolley, on which the bodies were placed, before they were shoved into the ovens at Auschwitz. At the age of 11, Martin Becker had no trouble dragging a body out of the gas chamber and throwing it up onto a trolley car.

My 1998 photo of a trolley for putting bodies into the oven at Auschwitz

My 1998 photo of a trolley for putting bodies into the oven at Auschwitz

In my photo above, there are lighted candles on the trolley where the bodies would have been placed by the Sonderkommando Jews.  At the age of 11, Martin Becker was not much taller than the trolley car.  Yet, he somehow managed to do his job as a Sonderkommando, so that he would not be shoved into the oven alive.

Why did the Nazis keep Martin Becker alive for 5 long years?  Didn’t they know that he might live to the age of 87 and tell his story to the world?

This quote is from the article about Martin Becker:

Born in Karlsruhe, Germany, Martin Becker was sent to Auschwitz in 1941, as a child of 11. His parents and grandparents were marched off to the gas chambers. He was handed a pliers and ordered to pull gold from the teeth of gassed corpses, individuals — he recalled in my living room this week — who moments earlier had been alive.

Martin Becker lived and worked in this death camp [Auschwitz] for five years, forced to serve as a Sonderkommando, one of the cursed crew charged with disposing of corpses, removing valuables and putting them in the ovens.

It was terrible,” he said simply, with devastating understatement. He recalled a friend he made among the Sonderkommando, Eric, who missed some of the gold in the teeth. He was thrown in the oven by a Nazi guard, still alive. He recalled 1944, when the Hungarian Jews were shipped to their deaths in Auschwitz: “They had a lot of gold in their teeth.”  […]

The Nazis were careful to kill the Sonderkommando at regular intervals. They were witnesses to crimes, and as such, needed to be liquidated. Martin Becker said that at a key moment of liquidation, he slipped into a line of Russian children and was overlooked.  […]

How many times did Martin have to slip into a line of Russia children to escape being killed?  According to Wikipedia, the Sonderkommando Jews were killed every 4 months, and replaced by Jews who had just arrived at the camp.

This quote is from Wikipedia:

Because of their intimate knowledge of the process of Nazi mass murder, the Sonderkommando were considered Geheimnisträger — bearers of secrets — and as such, they were kept in isolation from other camp inmates, except, of course, for those about to enter the gas chambers. Since the Nazis did not want Sonderkommandos’ knowledge to reach the outside world, they followed a policy of regularly gassing almost all the Sonderkommando and replacing them with new arrivals at intervals of approximately 4 months; the first task of the new Sonderkommandos would be to dispose of their predecessors’ corpses. Therefore since the inception of the Sonderkommando through to the liquidation of the camp there existed approximately 14 generations of Sonderkommando.[1]

Was Martin Becker big for his age, when he was 11 years old? Was he a big, strapping boy, who could throw the body of a grown man onto a trolley cart?  His photo below, shows that he is shorter than the average man today, but maybe he has shrunk with age.

Martin Becker was a Sonderkommando Jew at Auschwitz

Martin Becker was a Sonderkommando Jew at Auschwitz

Hasidim but I don’t believe ’em

Filed under: Holocaust — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 11:56 am
Hisidic Jew in Brooklyn, NY

Hisidic Jew in Brooklyn, NY

In an episode of “The Sopranos,” a popular TV series several years ago, Paulie Walnuts says “Hasidim but I don’t believe ’em.”  You can watch this famous episode on You Tube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YauJVdK8GPI

I thought of this when I read a blog post about Hasidim on this blog: http://blogs.forward.com/sisterhood-blog/194267/when-hasidic-boys-grow-up-without-real-school/

This quote is from the blog post, cited above:

Last summer, when I interviewed Hasidic men and women who grew up with little to no secular education, I remember feeling angry at this system that churns out, intentionally, boys who cannot speak or read English — the first step in acquiring basic skills to function as an adult in the 21st century. The words one brilliant man used to refer to educational neglect in Satmar is still ringing in my ears: “This is criminal.”

Indeed, it is. Educational neglect of this magnitude should be considered criminal. No community in America should be allowed to perpetuate such inattention to the wellbeing of children.

Watching this video made me think of the countless times my husband and I explained to our children why we don’t know certain basic concepts or historical facts, why my husband never learned how to punctuate a sentence. We talk freely about our childhoods and our desire to see them, our children, receive a solid education. We explain that education is power, and that it is the single driving force for human progression. We speak of our pride in their academic achievements and demonstrate its importance by asking questions about subjects we don’t know.

The next time my son says he hates school, I will play him this video. Hopefully he will get the message.

In reading the above words on the blog of an Hasidic woman, I was reminded of what Hitler wrote in his book Mein Kampf, about the first time that he saw an Hasidic Jew on the streets of Vienna.  I don’t want to waste my time looking for this passage in Mein Kampf, so I will give you this quote from Wikipedia, which tells about what it was like when Hitler lived in Vienna:

At the time Hitler lived there, Vienna was a hotbed of religious prejudice and racism.[37] Fears of being overrun by immigrants from the East were widespread, and the populist mayor, Karl Lueger, exploited the rhetoric of virulent antisemitism for political effect. Georg Schönerer’s pan-Germanic antisemitism had a strong following in the Mariahilf district, where Hitler lived.[38] Hitler read local newspapers, such as the Deutsches Volksblatt, that fanned prejudice and played on Christian fears of being swamped by an influx of eastern Jews.[39]

Hitler’s father was a follower of Georg Schönerer who advocated German nationalism.  Now the idea, of a country having a population of people of one race and one religion, has been thoroughly discredited by the Holocaustians who preach diversity.  Diversity causes problems in many countries of the world today, but it keeps the Jews safe, and allows them to live in any country they choose.  If there is ever a threat of another Holocaust, the Jews now have their own country where they can go to escape.