Scrapbookpages Blog

April 16, 2014

The little known fate of the Sudeten Germans

Filed under: Germany, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 4:21 pm

I am expanding on a comment written on my blog by one of my regular readers.  This quote is from the comment:  “The Sudeten Germans were robbed, persecuted and occasionally murdered by the Prague regime before the Munich Agreement. After the war, the Sudeten Germans were raped, murdered and hideously tortured in large numbers. Then all the survivors were expelled from the country.”

You don’t hear much about the suffering of the Sudeten Germans, although the Munich Agreement is frequently mentioned on comedy shows on TV, as jokes are made about Hitler taking all of Czechoslovakia after he was given the Sudentenland, following World War II.  (The word Sudeten will not go through the wordpress spell checker. This goes to show you how little is known about the Sudeten Germans.)

Fortress at Terezin with Sudeten mountains in the backgroun

Fortress at Terezin with Sudeten mountains in the background

Before I went to the Czech Republic several years ago, I did a lot of research on the subject and wrote about it on my website.  The following information is from my website scrapbookpages.com.

Theresienstadt (now called Terezin) was right on the dividing line between the Sudetenland and the remaining part of Czechoslovakia, with the demarcation line being immediately alongside the town’s fortifications, shown in the photo above. When the Sudetenland was given to the Germans in the Munich agreement, there were 25,000 Jews living there, who fled across the border into the town of Theresienstadt; some of them took temporary refuge in the Small Fortress at Theresienstadt.

Eduard Benes, who replaced Masaryk as president of Czechoslovakia in 1935, had been opposed to the Germans in World War I. During the period between wars, Benes was a strong supporter of the League of Nations and was active in trying to prevent Germany from regaining military power. As an opponent of Fascism, Benes had complained to the League of Nations many times when Hitler began to violate the terms of the Versailles Treaty by rearming and placing troops in the Rhineland on the border between France and Germany.

The Munich “appeasement” of Hitler was intended to prevent another world war, but soon afterwards, Hitler demanded the resignation of Benes, his unrelenting opponent, who was agitating against the German takeover of the Sudetenland. In an effort to maintain peace, Benes resigned and went to England where he set up a Czech government in exile.

On March 14, 1939, following the resignation of Benes, Slovakia declared itself an independent state under the rule of Father Jozef Tiso, a Catholic priest and a Nazi supporter. On the following day, the Nazis marched into Czechoslovakia and took over the rest of the country without a fight. The states of Bohemia and Moravia, which had been dominated by the Germans for centuries under the Holy Roman Empire, became a German Protectorate. The Czech town of Terezin became once again a German town, and the name was changed back to the original name of Theresienstadt.

Great Britain, France and Italy assumed responsibility for the conflict in Czechoslovakia since they had signed the Treaty of Versailles which ended the war and stripped the Germans and Austrians of a big chunk of their former territories. Czechoslovakia had become a country as a result of that treaty. America also fought on the side of the Allies in World War I, but did not ratify the Treaty of Versailles because it included the League of Nations, which the American Congress voted not to join.

Austria-Hungary and Germany both signed an Armistice based on the Fourteen Points proposed by Woodrow Wilson, the American President during the war years. One of the key points was self-determination which meant that all ethnic groups had the right to determine the country in which they would live. This point of Wilson’s Fourteen Points was violated by the Treaty of Versailles when half a million Poles and a million Hungarians, along with three and a half million ethnic Germans became citizens of the new country of Czechoslovakia, which was dominated by the Czechs.

In answer to Hitler’s complaints, the British formed a commission to study the problem. This resulted in the Munich agreement, signed on Sept. 30, 1938 between Germany, France, Italy and Great Britain, in which the borderland known as the Sudetenland, with its predominantly German population, was given to Germany. There were also 45,000 Jews living in the Sudetenland who were handed over to Hitler as a result of the Munich appeasement.

The Sudetenland had formerly been part of the Austrian Empire but by 1938, Austria was part of the new Greater German Reich created by Hitler in the Anschluss with Austria. The unification of Germany and Austria had been expressly forbidden by the Treaty of Versailles, but the Allies did not protest this violation of the treaty. The Czech government did not have a say in the Munich agreement, since the country of Czechoslovakia was not in existence before the Treaty of Versailles was signed.

The Czechs fought as partisans against the Fascists in World War II, even sending men from England into Czechoslovakia by parachute to assassinate a top Nazi, SS General Reinhard Heydrich, the head of the German Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia. According to Ben G. Frank in his book entitled “A Travel Guide to Jewish Europe,” over 50% of the Czech partisans were Jews.

After Slovakia split off into an independent country, it became an ally of the German Fascists. The rest of the small states in Czechoslovakia were taken over by Poland and Hungary to bring their former citizens back into their respective countries in accordance with Wilson’s Fourteen Points. Hungary became a Fascist ally of Germany, but there was still an ongoing dispute between Germany and Poland over the territory which Germany had lost to Poland after World War I. Germany had been divided into two parts, separated by the Polish Corridor which was created to give the Poles access to the port of Danzig.

Once again, Hitler used the excuse that ethnic Germans were being mistreated and discriminated against when he invaded Poland on September 1, 1939 after efforts to resolve the problem peacefully had failed. Allegedly, 58,000 ethic Germans had been killed since April 1939 when the Germans first started trying to negotiate for a right-of-way across the Polish Corridor. Without a highway or railroad through the Corridor, the Germans could only access the eastern part of Germany by boat.

At the heart of the dispute between Germany and Poland was the free city of Gdansk, formerly the German city of Danzig, with its 100% German population, which was taken from the Germans in the Treaty of Versailles. Another bone of contention was the industrial section of Silesia which was given to Poland after World War I. In a self-determination vote, the people of Silesia had voted to become part of Germany, but this was ignored by the League of Nations, even though this was one of Wilson’s Fourteen Points. Although war had been avoided in the conflict between the Germans and the Czechs, this time there was no “appeasement” of Hitler. Great Britain and France, after signing an agreement to protect Poland in case of an attack by Germany, were forced to declare war on Germany and World War II began two days after the first shots were fired on September 1, 1939.

With the defeat of Nazi Germany in World War II, Czechoslovakia again became an independent country and all the ethnic Germans, except for the few who could prove that they were anti-Fascist during the war, were expelled from their homes and sent into war-torn Germany, many of them dying along the way from hunger and exhaustion. The Czechs and the Jews exacted their revenge by attacking these refugees as they fled to Germany. Many of the refugees had to live for as long as 18 years in the former Nazi concentration camps, such as Dachau, until they could find new jobs and homes, as Germany was slowly rebuilt.

As soon as a typhus epidemic at Theresienstadt was brought under control, the prisoners were released and the Small Fortress became a prison for German Nazis from 1945 to 1948.

 

 

 

23 Comments »

  1. Interesting reading Deutschewelle which is the BRD state propaganda organ. Apparently a petition has been launched to remove the red army tanks from the red army memorial in Berlin. The senate of the BRD parliament has described this petition as ashighly offensive to those who ” liberated ” Berlin in 1945 . This once again demonstrates that the modern German state is a occupation construct which fulfills enthusiastically its roll as vassal state.

    Comment by peter — April 18, 2014 @ 5:52 am

    • Thanks a million for telling us about this. I have a photo of one of the tanks in question, and I put it up in a new blog post this morning. I don’t understand why the tanks at the Russian Memorial are “highly offensive” to the Russians who liberated Berlin. They might be highly offensive to the Germans, but why are they offensive to the Russians?

      Comment by furtherglory — April 18, 2014 @ 9:50 am

  2. It wouldn’t be a lie to say most Czechs today do not like Germans.

    Almost none of them know any of the history that has been mentioned here.

    Not a week goes by though on Czech TV without a reference, documentary or news article about the plight of the poor Jews during the Nazi occupation

    Comment by DB — April 17, 2014 @ 11:48 am

    • 200,000 Czechs in 1942 in Prague pledge loyalty to the German Reich.

      Comment by peter — April 18, 2014 @ 5:59 am

  3. I stayed in Terezin for two nights last week. In the Jewish museum there, they admit that ethnic-Germans were forced to live in Terezin whilst the Czechs were ethnically cleansing them after the war.

    I was at Dachau on Sunday, where I managed to find an old favourite of yours FG:

    Comment by The Black Rabbit of Inlé — April 17, 2014 @ 9:02 am

  4. Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points were a hypocritical measure for the dislocation of the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman empires, not for the strengthening of a future Germany. That meant that it was OK to force Germans to live under a foreign boot but it was not OK to let those Germans under alien control be led by a German authority accordingly to the principle of Self-Determination. Uniting all the Germans in a strong state was strictly forbidden by the victors of 1918 and that’s what ultimately led to WW2. That’s why England and America made everything possible to sabotage any peaceful settlement of the German-Polish disputes. Germany and Austria were supposed to stay little, weak and divided territorial entities. Hitler’s main mistake was to have united all the Germans and Austrians in a strong state with a successful economy. From that point, he and his new state had to be destroyed on any excuse.

    Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points were not “proposed by Woodrow Wilson during the war years” as said in the article. Wilson formulated his Fourteen Points in January 1918. The 8th point and the Balfour Declaration revealed Wilson’s true intention when he formulated his Fourteen Points. Wilson had been bought by Zionists (that’s why he made America enter WW1 when what was later know as the “Balfour declaration” had been agreed on). Wilson’s 8th point stipulated: “The Turkish portion of the present Ottoman Empire should be assured a secure sovereignty, but the other nationalities which are now under Turkish rule should be assured an undoubted security of life and an absolutely unmolested opportunity of autonomous development”. Wilson’s 8th point was an essential condition for the creation a Jewish homeland under British administration in Ottoman Palestine as formulated in the Balfour Declaration. Wilson’s Fourteen Points were not only a plan for the permanent weakening of the future vanquished. They were also and mainly the fulfillment of the contract he had with America’s Zionists.

    Furtherglory wrote: “Once again, Hitler used the excuse that ethnic Germans were being mistreated and discriminated against when he invaded Poland on September 1, 1939 after efforts to resolve the problem peacefully had failed.”

    Used the excuse? People don’t leave the homes which belonged to their family during centuries if they are not persecuted or forced to do it. Before Hitler invaded Poland, hundred of thousands of “Polish” ethnic Germans had left their homes because they were persecuted in Poland. At that time, there were German minorities in several countries. But nowhere else than in Poland were the German minorities massacred by the other locals as they were in Poland (the Bromberg Bloody Sunday and other “incidents”) when Hitler’s troops entered those countries. That revealed how bad the situation of the ethnic Germans was in that time’s Poland. I don’t know if 54,000 ethnic Germans had really been massacred in Poland prior to September 1939, but no doubt the fate of the “Polish” ethnic Germans had to be settled rapidly in one way or another. Great Britain had administered a world empire for centuries. That time’s British leaders knew very well that their military agreement with Poland wouldn’t help to settle the German-Polish disputes peacefully because the Polish “Colonel’s Regime” had no good reason to continue any negotiation with Germany with the British agreement in their pocket. The invasion of Poland was an excuse for that time’s British leaders (similar to the Belgian excuse of WW1) while the fate of the “Polish” ethnic Germans wasn’t an excuse for Hitler but a real issue. The discriminations against the “Polish” ethnic Germans were so little an excuse for Hitler that he ultimately formulated a Sixteen-Point Peace Plan in late August 1939 (http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1499&dat=19390831&id=h6VQAAAAIBAJ&sjid=HSIEAAAAIBAJ&pg=5991,3898320), when the Polish and German armies were already mobilized, in order to try to settle the fate of the “Polish” ethnic Germans and give peace a last chance. Poland didn’t even sent any emissary to Berlin to talk about Hitler’s Peace Plan. Speaks volumes…

    Comment by hermie — April 16, 2014 @ 7:22 pm

    • The quote from my website, which you included, was written many years ago, when I was trying to stick to the kosher version of history. I have since started writing about what really happened, as for example in this blog post, where I reveal that it was the Poles who fired the first shots: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2010/02/24/alfred-naujocks-and-the-start-of-world-war-ii/

      Comment by furtherglory — April 17, 2014 @ 7:24 am

    • Thank you for writing this. I agree with everything you wrote. You explained it very well.

      Comment by furtherglory — April 17, 2014 @ 7:35 am

    • Pulling a switcheroo on the Central Powers w.r.t. the 14 points does not equate to what you’ve written here. While the Central Powers put much store in them, Wilson’s 14 points were never agreed to or implemented by the Allies; so I fail to see why you write in the way you do here. FG’s post is more correct than what you wrote here. BTW, January 1918 is “during the war years”.

      Comment by blake121666 — April 18, 2014 @ 2:59 am

      • I don’t fully agree with the last sentence of your first paragraph either. Germany was a threat to the money power (Jews), was gravely hobbled by WW1, and destroyed by WW2. You’re right in that the path the Germans were taking was not in the interest of these money power, but the “From that point on” part needs to be seen in the larger context of the previous actions of the money power. Hostility did not start at the point you’re referring to.

        Comment by blake121666 — April 18, 2014 @ 3:14 am

        • @Blake

          Wilson’s Fourteen Points were the guiding line of the dismantling of the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman empire as it was established and agreed on at Versailles in 1919. Read Wilson’s 14 points and the Treaty of Versailles. Hard to say Wilson’s 14 points were never implemented by the Allies as you wrote.

          “BTW, January 1918 is “during the war years”.”…January 1918 is more precisely during the last war year. Important to mention that as it shows Wilson’s 14 points were just a hypocritical Zionist-induced plan for the destruction of the vanquished’s empires and the spoliation of Palestine. When Theodore Herzl tried to buy Palestine in the late 1890’s and early1900’s, the Ottoman Sultan firmly rejected Herzl’s offer, arguying he could never do such a thing as Palestine belonged to its inhabitants and not to himself. From that moment, it was clear that a Zionist state could be created in Palestine only after the dismantling of the Ottoman empire. As early as 1903, the President of the World Zionist Organization Max Nordau spoke of a “future world war” and a “peace conference – where with the help of England a free and Jewish Palestine will be created”. During WW1, Zionists contacted the Kaiser and made him pressure the Ottoman sultan for the creation of a Jewish homeland in Ottoman Palestine. Once again, the Ottoman Sultan refused. So the Zionists decided to use the Allies in order to destroy the Ottoman empire and get Palestine for themselves. When England was about to be defeated, they offered the British leaders to make America enter WW1 in order to save them from defeat but in exchange of the promise of establishing a Jewish homeland in Palestine after victory (Balfour declaration). The British leaders accepted the Zionist offer and America entered WW1 under the false excuse of the Lusitania. Of course, the Zionists could offer such a thing only because they were controlling U.S. President Woodrow Wilson. Wilson never cared about the right to self-determination of the populations administered by the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman empire at that time. Wilson’s 14 points on the right to self-determination was just a hypocritical way to fulfill his side of the contract on which he had agreed with America’s influent Zionists and to destroy serious economic competitors (especially the newly-born German empire) simultaneously. In fact, if I wanted to destroy America’s power, i would do the same thing: I would promote the right to self-determination of the U.S. states and I would split the USA into as many independent small territorial areas as possible, even if I don’t care about the right to self-determination of the U.S. states at all.

          “Hostility did not start at the point you’re referring to.”

          That’s true, blake. Hostility started from the German unification. That’s why France declared war on Prussia in 1870. That time’s French leaders wanted to prevent the emergence of a powerful neighbor as the German state. That first attempt failed and France was defeated. 50 years later, when WW1 started, Britain used the false excuse of the violation of Belgium’s neutrality in order to declare war on her German competitor and break it. I wrote “the false excuse of the violation of Belgium’s neutrality” because the treaty on Belgium’s neutrality allowed the surrounding countries to ship troops though Belgium in case of war. So Britain was not forced to declare war on Germany when German troops entered Belgium’s territory. Whatever, that second attempt to break the German competitor succeeded and Germany was defeated and then dismantled. After that, German and Austria stayed weak and divided during 15 years. To that moment, everything was OK to the Western Capitalist Powers. But in January 1933, an exceptional man became Germany’s new leader. That new German leader quickly turned Germany into a great world power again. And he didn’t do that with a classical capitalistic economy. No. He did that with a new innovative kind of economy. A little later, that man started to destroy the territorial provisions of the treaty of Versailles and he succesfully reunited most ethnic Germans Inside the borders of a new strong German state. How could that man dare build a strong economy without Jewish gold and banks and then undo the perpetual weakening of the German-Austrian people established at Versailles 20 years earlier? That was too much for the Western Capitalist Powers. That man had to be stopped. So the Western Captialist Powers used the ethnic Germans of Poland as hostages in order to force a war on that impudent man and his dissident regime. Accordingly to that, Britain sabotaged the running German-Polish negotiations for a peaceful settlement of the German-Polish disputes by giving a military guarantee to the Polish Colonels’ Regime. The German-Polish negotiations instantly stopped and the Polish Colonels’ Regime increased the oppression of the “Polish” ethnic Germans and other provocations toward Germany. As expected, a few months later, a German-Polish war couldn’t be avoided anymore and the Western Capitalist Powers used that opportunity to declare war on Germany and ultimately bring under the heel of the banksters again…

          Comment by hermie — April 20, 2014 @ 10:28 am

          • You place too much importance on the 14 points which were not implemented. The Versailles treaty was a rejection of the 14 points. And January 1918 was within the first year of America’s entry into the war on the Allied side. I don’t agree with some of your interpretation of German unification either; but let’s just leave it alone. Quit attaching so much importance to the rejected and unimplemented 14 points (which called for the opposite of your beef with what actually happened).

            Comment by blake121666 — April 20, 2014 @ 4:58 pm

            • Add German heavy “reparations”, the destruction of the German army, the German War Guilt Clause and the loss of all the German colonies to Wilson’s 14 points (especially the ones quoted below) and you have the Treaty of Versailles. Wilson himself knew the heavy weight his points had had in the redrawing of post-war Europe. After the Versailles conference he even claimed that “at last the world knows America as the savior of the world!” And the specific part of America which had allegedly saved the world at Versailles was well-known at that time: the Conference of Versailles wasn’t ironically nicknamed “the Kosher Conference” for nothing.😉

              Wilson’s 14 points:

              “4. All French territory should be freed and the invaded portions restored, and the wrong done to France by Prussia in 1871 in the matter of Alsace-Lorraine, which has unsettled the peace of the world for nearly fifty years, should be righted, in order that peace may once more be made secure in the interest of all.”

              “6. The people of Austria-Hungary, whose place among the nations we wish to see safeguarded and assured, should be accorded the freest opportunity to autonomous development.”

              “7. international guarantees of the political and economic independence and territorial integrity of the several Balkan states should be entered into.”

              “8. The Turkish portion of the present Ottoman Empire should be assured a secure sovereignty, but the other nationalities which are now under Turkish rule should be assured an undoubted security of life and an absolutely unmolested opportunity of autonomous development”

              “9. An independent Polish state should be erected […] which should be assured a free and secure access to the sea, and whose political and economic independence and territorial integrity should be guaranteed by international covenant.”

              Comment by hermie — April 21, 2014 @ 8:36 am

              • The Armistice, following World War I, was based on the Fourteen Points proposed by Woodrow Wilson. One of the key points was self-determination which meant that all ethnic groups had the right to determine the country in which they would live. This point of Wilson’s Fourteen Points, which I think was in Point #4, was violated by the Treaty of Versailles when half a million Poles and a million Hungarians, along with three and a half million ethnic Germans became citizens of the new country of Czechoslovakia, which was dominated by the Czechs.

                In answer to Hitler’s complaints about this, the British formed a commission to study the problem. This resulted in the Munich agreement, signed on Sept. 30, 1938 between Germany, France, Italy and Great Britain, in which the borderland known as the Sudetenland, with its predominantly German population, was given to Germany.

                There were also 45,000 Jews living in the Sudetenland who were handed over to Hitler as a result of the Munich appeasement. The Sudetenland had formerly been part of the Austrian Empire but by 1938, Austria was part of the new Greater German Reich created by Hitler in the Anschluss with Austria.

                The unification of Germany and Austria had been expressly forbidden by the Treaty of Versailles, but the Allies did not protest this violation of the treaty. The Czech government did not have a say in the Munich agreement, since the country of Czechoslovakia was not in existence before the Treaty of Versailles was signed.

                Comment by furtherglory — April 21, 2014 @ 9:47 am

  5. Before Munich:

    http://www.wintersonnenwende.com/scriptorium/english/archives/czechoslovakiawithin/csw05.html

    …With the object of weakening German economic power the Czechs started a campaign against this key position. At the same time the policy of Czech penetration was begun, with the object of converting the purely German-speaking areas into mixed districts.

    The prevalence of large estates in the Sudeten country, as opposed to the relatively small number of small holdings, has led to agitation in favour of redistribution of land, even in pre-war days. This measure of land reform, however that may be, was undertaken by the Czechs soon after the creation of the Republic. They were not, however, actuated by a zeal for social reform; their action was purely national. “Land reform” was exploited by the Czechs as a means to the expropriation of non-Slav soil, and in order to permit of the settlement of Czechs in the German-speaking districts. While the Government claimed to be taking from the rich in order to give to the poor, they made no attempt at an equitable redistribution of the confiscated acres. Over 1,250,000 acres of German land were expropriated between 1921 and 1932, with the semi-officially admitted aim of weakening the German position. This land was acquired by the State against paid or promised indemnities amounting to a mere fraction [52] of its real value. Ninety-six per cent. of this land, all of which had been in German ownership, was allotted to Czech farmers. The German-speaking population lost one-sixth of their land and the formerly compact German enclave was now dotted with Czech cells. A negligible proportion of the land was returned to German ownership.

    In the sacred name of land reform 3,250 German farmers were reduced to the state of labourers while 18,500 Czech labourers were promoted to that of farmer. The German farm labourer also suffered. According to official Czech figures there has been an increase of 66,000 in agricultural unemployment figures since this reform.

    The German-owned forests were also confiscated by the State. In Bohemia alone 300,000 acres of forest land, 87% of the whole, were taken from their German owners, while the Czech forest owners in Bohemia lost only 13% of their holdings. Land reform was also used as a means to appropriate German industrial enterprises. Many German breweries, sugar factories and saw mills, shared the fate of farm and forest land. The so-called reform has been conducted in such a manner as to lead to the present-day possession by the German-speaking population of only 3% of the whole land in the Czech Republic, and has rendered acquisition of a larger proportion almost impossible.

    This land appropriation was regarded by the Czechs as the most successful method of German denationalization. They adopted further means to [53] this end: The Civil Service became predominantly Czech. Czech nationalism was emphasized by the appearance of a horde of Czech police, customs officials, post office clerks, and the like; most of them chosen with an eye to the size of their families. They were soon followed by Czech business men and commercial travellers and attempts were made to introduce Czech working men. Wherever a Czech appeared a German lost his occupation, whether as official or labourer. In other words, he was deliberately deprived of his means of livelihood. Between 1918 and 1938 150,000 Czechs were “dumped” in German-speaking areas, giving rise to a commensurate increase in German unemployment figures.

    Comment by fnn — April 16, 2014 @ 7:05 pm

    • cont’d

      From the very first days of the new State the Czech Government started to get rid of German civil servants in order to create posts for their own nationals. Since 1918 a total of 40,000 Sudeten officials have been dismissed (cf. The Times, 2. 12. 37, which mentioned that tens of thousands of Germans have been dismissed in this manner).

      As a result of this systematic action the proportion of posts in the administration, the postal service, railways, and other public utility concerns held by Germans is altogether incommensurate with their population ratio. In Bohemia, where 32.4% of the population is German, 29.5% postal officials were German in 1929, but this figure had fallen to 15.4% in 1930. The percentage of Germans employed under the Ministry of Justice was 11.8%, according to a speech made by M. Hodza in November, 1937, though the German population ratio amounted to 22.4%. From the same source we learn that there are 11% of Germans in the railway service, 13% in the revenue service, and 10% employed by the postal service. The proportion of long-service German enlisted men is noticeably small. There are public undertakings, like the Prague post office savings bank, which employ no Germans whatsoever. All this goes to show Czech determination to employ none [55] but Czechs in the public service. Many Czech officials sent to German-speaking areas for the purpose of German denationalization cannot even speak the language of the district. On the other hand, on the few occasions when official posts are allotted to Germans, they are almost invariably in Czech-speaking districts. Again with the object of denationalization, more especially the case of the prospective officials’ children.

      Comment by fnn — April 16, 2014 @ 7:09 pm

      • Under the Czech Terror in Bohemia:
        Arrest of English Investigators by the Czech Police

        http://www.wintersonnenwende.com/scriptorium/english/archives/czechconspiracy/cc06.html

        …First-hand evidence of the conditions existing in the “Hunger districts” of Northern Bohemia can only be obtained as the result of a personal visit and careful investigation. Of the sixteen districts officially classified as “Hungergebiete,” that is to say with the highest unemployment rate, fifteen are German, all once in the most prosperous districts of Bohemia. Every thousand meters along the Karlsbad-Eger road are to be seen derelict porcelain, glass, and paper factories, all of them German, which had been in this state since 1930. It has been officially stated that within the last eight years 1,800 factories have been closed down, almost all of these in Sudeten
        territory – all this long before Hitler’s advent to power in Germany. For miles around tall, smokeless factory chimneys dot the landscape, but there is no sign of the smoke of industrial activity. The once busy and prosperous workmen who manned them now live idle and starving in huts and hovels in their derelict villages. We passed through village after village in this cemetery of industry. In the village of Ellbogen we visited the dilapidated German hospital, with a nominal accommodation for seventy patients. This served a very large district and, in spite of the restricted accommodation, had for long been made to accommodate as many as 140 patients. The hospital comprised a general ward, surgical ward, an infectious diseases war, a gynaecological ward, and a children’s ward. In the children’s and infectious diseases ward patients were accommodated two in a bed. The overworked staff consisted only of the German surgeon, one medical assistant and several Roman Catholic nuns. The hospital had received no help or subsidies from the State for a very long time. They were appallingly short of equipment and the building was in a shocking state of disrepair.
        The surgeon-in-charge informed me that there were so many cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in the population that they were obliged to turn all these away. Untreated goitre was also very common in the population. In addition to his work in the general wards the surgeon-in-charge was conducting on an average seven major operations a day.

        In Neusattl, in sharp contrast to the shacks and hovels we were visiting, stood an imposing solid concrete building. This was a new Czech school in a district where the population was almost exclusively German. (See Photograph.) The headmaster informed me that it was strictly forbidden for foreigners to visit their school or see the children. During the recent trouble a case was reported of a small German boy being
        taken to hospital suffering from severe knife wounds inflicted upon him by the children of Czech officials in a Czech school. In other villages we visited German schools which were in a state of neglect and disrepair and short of essential equipment. Children in the playground were of poor physique, rickety and under-nourished. Notices were posted on all the German schools: “Betteln Verboten” – “Begging Forbidden.” According to information based on official statistics there are approximately 1,450 State Elementary Schools for the minority populations, of which only 26 are provided for the Germans – the largest minority in the country!

        Comment by fnn — April 16, 2014 @ 7:15 pm

        • Czech mass murder of Sudeten German protesters in 1919:

          http://www.wintersonnenwende.com/scriptorium/english/archives/sginferno/sgi02.html#dead

          …On March 4, 1919, the Austrian National Assembly solemnly convened its first session in Vienna. Czech troops forcibly prevented the participation of Sudeten German representatives.

          In large-scale demonstrations the public now demanded freedom and democracy, and that right to self-determination which the Allies had declared to be one of their own aims of war. The Sudeten Germans congregated at these proclamations unarmed, informed by their faith in their right. But then the incomprehensible happened. On Czech orders, Czechs in uniform shot at those gathered together. The crashing of hand grenades accompanied the salvos of gunfire and the screams of those mortally wounded – 54 dead and hundreds of injured remained lying in the streets. Among the places where this happened were Arnau, Aussig, Eger, Kaaden, Mies, Karlsbad, Sternberg and Freudenthal. The 54 dead included 20 women and girls, an 80-year-old man, one youth of 16, one of 13 and one only eleven years old! This bloody event that ought to have shaken the world to its foundations remained without echo.

          Later, to justify the use of armed force, it was claimed that the Czech executive powers had acted in sudden, nervous panic. They had not; they had acted on an order given by the Prague Ministry of the Interior, instructing them to prevent the proclamations with force of arms. That explains the fact that the shooting of participants in these demonstrations took place everywhere at almost exactly the same time.

          In this way, demonstrations that might have attracted world attention were to be thwarted once and for all. Any attempt at exercising the right to self-determination drew immediate gunfire. After March 4, another 53 Germans fell victim to Czech bullets. More than 2,000 gravely wounded were taken to hospitals. That was the beginning of the sham democracy along the Moldau River (“Vltava”). The cries for self-determination had been drowned in blood.

          Comment by fnn — April 16, 2014 @ 7:25 pm

  6. it wasn’t only the Sudeten Volksdeutsch, you can throw the Siebenbuger Saxons and Donauschwabs in there as well.

    Comment by Heinz — April 16, 2014 @ 4:43 pm


RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: