Scrapbookpages Blog

May 17, 2014

Beware of illustrating news articles with photos that promote Holocaust denial

Filed under: Holocaust — Tags: , , , , — furtherglory @ 10:00 am

Update, Sept. 20, 2014:

This photo was used to illustrate a news article about the Holocaust

This photo was used to illustrate a news article about the Holocaust

The photo above was taken at Bergen-Belsen after the camp was voluntarily turned over to the British.  It shows an adult woman, who is overweight, and a group of children that look healthy and well-fed.  This type of photo should not be used to illustrate the horror of the Holocaust. I copied the photo from this news article: http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/sep/18/night-will-fall-review-holocaust-documentary-hitchcock-liberation-belsen-auschwitz

Continue reading my original post:

Still shot from Soviet film made in February 1945

Still shot from Soviet film made in February 1945

The photo above, which shows child survivors of Auschwitz-Birkenau, is used in an article about the Holocaust, entitled “The World is Full of Holocaust Deniers,” which you can read in full here. The child on the far right is Miriam Moses. Her twin sister is Eva Moses Kor, a survivor who is still alive today.

A word to the wise:  Don’t use photos like this when promoting the Holocaust or when railing against Holocaust deniers.

This quote is from the article, which is illustrated by the photo above:

Only 54 percent of the world’s population has heard of the Holocaust.

54 percent.

This is the most staggering statistic in a new survey by the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) of more than 53,000 people in over 100 countries, conducted by First International Resources. But that figure speaks to only those who have heard of it: Only a third of the world’s population believe the genocide has been accurately described in historical accounts. Some said they thought the number of people who died has been exaggerated; others said they believe it’s a myth. Thirty percent of respondents said it’s probably true that “Jews still talk too much about what happened to them in the Holocaust.”

Seventy years after the liberation of Auschwitz, two-thirds of the world’s population don’t know the Holocaust happened—or they deny it.

I find it hard to believe that two-thirds of the people in the world today have never heard of the Holocaust — or that they deny it. Using  photos, like the one shown at the top of my blog post, will cause even more people to deny the Holocaust.  As every Holocaust True Believer knows, children under the age of 15 were immediately gassed upon arrival at Auschwitz, unless they were twins.

So what should Holocaust promoters do?  My suggestion is that they should use photos of dead bodies that do NOT illustrate the Holocaust, but claim that the bodies are dead Jews, killed in the Holocaust.

For example the photo below, which shows prisoners killed by American bombs at Nordhausen; this photo is frequently used by Holocaust promoters, who claim that these are the bodies of Jews killed by the Nazis.

Photo shows prisoners killed by American bombs at Nordhausen

Photo shows prisoners killed by American bombs at Nordhausen concentration camp

During World War II, German soldiers were allowed, and even encouraged, to carry cameras. American soldiers were not allowed to carry cameras, but many of them took  cameras from the cold dead hands of German soldiers, and used them to take photos of the concentration camps.  Soviet soldiers were lucky to have a rifle, and most of them had probably never even seen a camera.

Auschwitz was “liberated” by Soviet soldiers on January 27, 1945, but it was not until February 1945 that the Soviets finally got around to filming the Auschwitz survivors.  Because of this, the only images of the Auschwitz survivors, that can be seen today, are still shots from the Soviet film. Unfortunately, these still shots show Auschwitz inmates as being in good health.

Child survivors with chubby cheeks show their tattoos

Child survivors with chubby cheeks show their tattoos

For example, the photo above is unsuitable for a story about the horror of Auschwitz because it shows healthy children.  So what should Holocaust promoters do?

The photo below is frequently used to illustrate the alleged ill treatment of Jewish children at Auschwitz. The photo actually shows Gypsy children, who were suffering from a disease called “Noma.”

Gypsy children, suffering from a disease called

Gypsy children, suffering from a disease called “Noma” were left behind at Auschwitz

Notice the girl, on the far left in the front row, who has a beautiful face. Holocaust promoters use this photo to show how cruel the Nazis were, claiming that this girl was tortured because she was so pretty.

The photo below, which is a still shot from the Soviet film, shows a child survivor of Auschwitz, who is being carried out of a brick building at Auschwitz because he is too weak to walk.

Suitable photo for a news article about Holocaust denial

Suitable photo for a news article about Holocaust denial

Miriam Moses, the twin sister of Eva Moses Kor is shown on the far right in the photo at the top of my blog post. Her twin sister, Eva Moses Kor, is shown on the far right in the photo below, which is also a still shot from  the Soviet film.

Miriam Kor is shown in the back row on the far left

Eva Moses Kor is shown in the second row on the far right

Dr. Josef Mengele, known as “Doctor Death” by Holocaustians, was famous for giving chocolate and hair ribbons to the little girls at Auschwitz. In the film, taken by the Soviets, it appears that Eva Moses is seriously overweight, possibly from eating too much chocolate.  This is an example of a photo which should NOT be used by Holocaust promoters.

The photo below, which shows Auschwitz survivors who are not in the best of health, would be a suitable photo for Holocaust promotion.

Still photo from Soviet film shows Auschwitz survivors

Still photo from Soviet film shows Auschwitz survivors

Still shot from the Soviet film which depicts the liberation of Auschwitz

Still shot from the Soviet film which depicts the liberation of Auschwitz

I have the photo, shown above, on my website, along with the following text:

The photograph above shows some of the 5,800 Birkenau survivors, most of whom look like well-fed Polish peasants, walking out of the camp shortly after Auschwitz-Birkenau was liberated by Soviet troops on January 27, 1945. In the background you can see the wooden barracks buildings, with windows under the roof, and the posts of the barbed wire fence. These survivors are walking along the interior camp road that bisects the Birkenau camp from north to south, connecting the women’s camp with the new section of Birkenau, known as “Mexico.” This is a still picture taken from the Soviet movie which is shown at the beginning of the tour at the Auschwitz Museum.

The tall, skinny guy wearing an arm band is Dr. Otto Wolken, a medical doctor in the Birkenau Quarantine camp, who stayed behind to help his fellow prisoners when the Birkenau camp was evacuated. He was the first witness to testify at the Auschwitz Trial, held by the German government in Frankfurt between 1963 and 1965.

You can see part of the Soviet film in this YouTube video: