Scrapbookpages Blog

July 4, 2014

The famous old car in the ruins at Oradour-sur-Glane

Filed under: Germany, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 10:59 am

There is renewed interest in Ordour-sur-Glane because an 88-year-old German army veteran might soon be put on trial in Germany, as a war criminal, because he was there when the Germans did a legal reprisal against the citizens of the town.

Oradour-sur-Glane is now a popular tourist attraction, and an old car in the ruins is frequently photographed. I took photos of the car when I visited the ruins several years ago.

Famous old car at Oradour-sur-Glane

My best photo of the famous old car at Oradour-sur-Glane

There are many old cars in the ruins of Oradour-sur-Glane, but the  most famous one is the car, shown in my photo above.

This old car allegedly belonged to Dr. Jacques Desourteaux, the town doctor who arrived back in the village just as the villagers were being assembled on the Fairgrounds. He had been visiting a patient in a nearby hamlet.  The car is just a burned-out empty shell: everything in the interior is gone except the steering wheel. The roof of the car is gone, but the luggage rack is still intact.

Old car with the fairgrounds in the background

Early morning photo of the old car with the fairgrounds in the background

Rear view of the old car at the fairgrounds

Rear view of the old car at the fairgrounds

Notice the bricks that have been placed under the car to keep it from sinking into the ground.

According to Sarah Farmer, in her book entitled Martyred Village, an effort was made in 1992 to preserve this famous old car. Restoration experts dismantled the car, sanded the body, painted the interior with tar to prevent further decay and waxed the outside to repel moisture.

The famous old car with a building in the background

The famous old car with a building on the fairgrounds in the background

The photo directly above shows the old car in front of a building. This photo was taken with a telephoto lens, which makes the car look closer to the building than it really is. A similar photo is shown on the cover of a video that I purchased in the bookshop of the Center of Memory, except that the direction of the car in the video photo is reversed.

According to Sarah Farmer’s book, Martyred Village, the car on the Fairgrounds, shown in the  photos above, is NOT the car, owned by Dr. Jacques Desourteaux.

In her book, Sarah Farmer wrote the following regarding the car:

“When Dr. Desourteaux arrived at the entrance to the town, soldiers forced him to drive up the main street and stop across from the marketplace, where he joined the assembled townspeople. He died with the others that afternoon. A few weeks later, the doctor’s brother and his nephew moved the Desourteaux car to the family property, where it still lies inside the garden wall. The car on the marketplace actually belonged to the wine merchant.”

The doctor’s brother was Hubert Desourteaux and his nephew was Andre Desourteaux.

The old car was at the entrance into the fairgrounds, as shown in my photo below.

The famous old car was parked at the entrance into the fairgrounds

The famous old car is parked at the entrance into the fairgrounds

How the French use a baby’s pram to demonize the German people

Filed under: Germany, World War II — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 8:07 am
Baby's Pram near altar in church at Oradour-sur-Glane

Baby’s Pram to the right of the altar in the church at Oradour-sur-Glane

There is a heated discussion going on in the comment section of my recent blog post about Oradour-sur-Glane.  There is a difference of opinion about whether the German army should have stopped the French terrorists, who were fighting illegally in World War II, by doing a legal reprisal. Some of the visitors to my blog believe that the French should have been allowed to burn captured German soldiers alive, and that the Germans should not have stopped the French by legal means.

The reprisal, conducted by the Germans at Oradour-sur-Glane, would have been completely forgotten by now, had it not been for the efforts of the French to keep the Oradour-sur-Glane story alive.  The ruined village is now a tourist attraction, on par with Auschwitz.  One of the sights that causes tourists to weep is the baby’s pram, which has been placed strategicly near the altar.

When I visited the ruins of Oradour-sur-Glane several years ago, I was appalled by the placement of a baby’s pram near the altar of the church.  In the photo at the top of this page, you can see an old rusted baby’s pram on the right side of the altar. The photo above shows a close-up of the pram.

Close-up of baby's pram inside church at Oradour-sur-Glane

Close-up of baby’s pram inside church at Oradour-sur-Glane

Notice that there is a large hole in the floor in the photo at the top of this page. The photo below shows a close-up of the hole.  In the background, you can see the baby’s pram.

Close-up of the hole in the floor near the communion rail in the church

Close-up of the hole in the floor near the communion rail in the church

Tourists are made to believe that mothers, in the church that day, took their babies behind the communion rail to save them from the German soldiers who had entered the church in order to kill the women and children.  In those days, women were forbidden to go behind the communion rail, except in a position of servitude, such as cleaning the church.

While the evil Germans were blowing up babies in their prams, the side altar on the left side of the church remained in pristine condition.

Side altar in the church at Oradour-sur-Glane is in pristine condition

Side altar in the church at Oradour-sur-Glane is in pristine condition

For any open-minded person, one glance inside the church shows what really happened at Oradour-sur-Glane.  The town was full of French Resistance fighters who were storing explosives inside the church.  German soldiers did not enter the church and blow up babies in their prams, but try to tell that to today’s German haters.

The records of the trial of the German soldiers have been sealed for 100 years, so that the German haters can continue their vile comments about the tragedy.

You can read the official version of what happened at Oradour-sur-Glane on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Oradour-sur-Glane/Story/OfficialStory.html

If you believe the official version of what happened at Oradour-sur-Glane, I have a bridge that I want to sell you….