Scrapbookpages Blog

July 25, 2014

Why does the Majdanek death camp get no respect?

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 9:29 am

This morning, I read an article in the Epoch Times about the Majdanek death camp in the city of Lublin in Poland.  The article is entitled The Forgotten Concentration Camp in Poland Left Off the “Holocaust Tourism” Circuit.  What a revolting deveopment this is !!!

Double barbed-wire fence around Majdanek

Double barbed-wire fence around Majdanek

This quote is from the article:

Today the anniversary of the liberation of Majdanek passes almost unnoticed, unlike that of the liberation of Auschwitz, fully six months later in January 1945, which has been adopted in Britain as Holocaust Memorial Day. In history books, in film and on television, the discovery of the concentration camps in Germany by Allied troops in April 1945 is recognised as a pivotal moment in world history, when humankind had to re-assess its understanding of what one set of people might do to another, after which, in Adorno’s words, it would be barbaric to write poetry.

The photo below is at the top of the article. (Click on the photo to enlarge)

Monument at the Majdanek memorial site

Monument at the Majdanek memorial site

Monument at Majdanek is very close to a major road

Monument at Majdanek is very close to a major road that goes past the camp

In the photo above, you can see several guard towers and another monument on the far left side. Suddenly coming upon this huge monument is like coming upon Stonehenge as you are driving down the road.  In my humble opinion, this eyesore should be torn down.

Monument which covers the ashes of prisoners killed at Majdanek

Monument which covers the ashes of prisoners killed at Majdanek

The ashes under the huge dome, shown in the photo above, were recovered from a compost pile in the camp. For all we know, these ashes were put on the snow-covered paths inside the camp, and then put on the compost pile, after being removed when the snow had melted.

Close-up of the dome which covers the ashes at Majdanek

Close-up of the dome which covers the ashes at Majdanek

The words on the dome, translated into English, mean “Let our fate be a warning to you.”

The Majdanek camp, which was called Maidanek by the Germans, was the very first Nazi camp, of any kind, to be liberated by the Allies; it was liberated on July 23, 1944. Most of the prisoners had been marched out of the camp and taken to other camps that were not yet in a war zone.  Only a few crippled Russian POWs, who had defected to the side of the Germans, had been left behind; they are shown in the photo below.

Russian POWs who had defected were left behind at Majdanek

Russian POWs who had defected were left behind at Majdanek

As the very first Nazi camp to be liberated, one would expect the remains of the camp to be the first one on the list of camps to be visited by today’s tourists.  All of the gas chambers at Majdanek are still intact and there are many barrack buildings still standing.  So why does Majdanek get no respect?  I think that it is because the number of Jewish deaths at Majdanek has now been officially downgraded to 59,000. The official number of all the deaths at Majdanek has been downgraded to 78,000.  The Soviet liberators initially reported that 1.5 million people had been killed at Majdanek; this was the number of deaths that the Nazis were charged with at the Nuremberg IMT.

You can read about the Majdanek death camp on my website here.

Several barracks buildings were converted into  Museum

Several barracks buildings are filled with artifacts in a museum

Majdanek was opened to Polish tourists soon after it was liberated

Majdanek was opened to Polish tourists soon after it was liberated

Guard tower at Majdanek camp

Guard tower at Majdanek camp

1 Comment »

  1. When the Soviets repatriated their former soldiers from German POW camps, they packed them straight off to concentration camps in the GuLag, where most of them eventually died. They did this regardless of whether their former soldier had defected or not. As many or more inmates from Majdanek may thus have died in the GuLag as died in Majdanek itself.

    Comment by Jett Rucker — July 25, 2014 @ 1:14 pm


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