Scrapbookpages Blog

September 29, 2014

Vergangenheitsbew√§ltigung is failing in Germany and anti-Semitism is on the march

According to a news article which you can read in full here, “With anti-Semitism on the march, Germany’s politicians and opinion makers are grappling with what went wrong with the country’s seven-decade-long struggle to come to terms with its past, or as they call it, Vergangenheitsbew√§ltigung.”

In other words, the Germans can never bow low enough to the Jews; they can never build enough monuments in honor of the Holocaust; nor can they ever pay enough restitution to the Jews.

I previously blogged about this on this blog post: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2014/07/05/american-pastor-jobst-bittner-thinks-todays-germans-have-original-sin-and-collective-guilt-for-the-holocaust/

I also blogged about the number of German Jews who were killed in the Holocaust: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2011/02/02/how-many-german-jews-were-killed-in-the-holocaust/

This quote is from the news article cited above:

Since the Holocaust, Germany has measured its progress by how the country treats Jews. For example, the government provided generous funding to rebuild Jewish communities and allowed Jews from the former Soviet Union to relocate to Germany. But with a rising tide of anti-Semitism in recent months, there are now questions about how significant the culture of Holocaust remembrance has been in preventing hatred of Jews.

The wave of modern anti-Semitic rhetoric and violence inundating Germany in recent months jolted Chancellor Angela Merkel and religious and political leaders to participate in a “Stand-Up: Jew-Hatred-Never Again!” rally organized on Sept. 14 by the Central Council of Jews in Germany in the heart of Berlin’s government district, not far from the country’s national Holocaust memorial.

Today’s Germans cannot walk three feet without literally stumbling on Stolpersteine, which are stumbling stones honoring individual Jews who lost their lives in the Holocaust, as well as some Jews who survived the Holocaust.

Stumbling stones in Heidelberg in honor of Max and Olger Mayer

Stumbling stones in Heidelberg in honor of two German Jews Max and Olga Mayer

Thanks to Hitler and the Transfer Agreement, the Jews now have their own country, but they don’t have to live in it. The Jews can live in any country in the world, where they can set up their monuments and museums.

In spite of this, the Jews still want to live in Germany.

This quote is from the news article:

The list of anti-Semitic incidents [in Germany] between July and early September is long. Protests against Israel’s Operation Protective Edge in Gaza led seamlessly to Molotov cocktails tossed at a synagogue in Wuppertal, a city in western Germany, on July 29 — the first torching of a Wuppertal synagogue was during the Hitler era in 1938. Anti-Israel protesters attacked Jews for wearing kippot on the streets of Berlin in a couple of incidents in July. And that’s just a taste.

German authorities recorded 184 anti-Semitic incidents in June and July. According to a study by German human rights NGO Amadeu Antonio Foundation, there were 25 anti-Semitic incidents in August.

To me, the two photos below illustrate why Jews and Germans should not live in the same country. The first photo shows a Jewish Museum in Berlin and the second photo shows the entrance into the Museum through a traditional German building.

Jewish museum in Berlin

Jewish museum in Berlin

Traditional German building right next to the Jewish Museum

Traditional German building right next to the Jewish Museum