Scrapbookpages Blog

October 7, 2014

The famous Jewish boycott of German goods in March 1933

You can read about the famous “International Jewish Boycott of German Goods” on Wikipedia at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_boycott_of_German_goods

Famous rally at which the boycott of German goods started in America

Famous rally at the start of the boycott of German goods

The caption on the above photo is this: A rally to boycott Nazi Germany, held at the third Madison Square Garden on March 15, 1937. It was sponsored by the American Jewish Congress and the Jewish Labor Committee. John L. Lewis of the Congress of Industrial Organizations and New York City mayor Fiorello LaGuardia were among the speakers.[1]

Boycott of stores in America in 1933

Boycott of stores in America in 1933

Jewish stores in Germany were boycotted for one day

Jewish stores in Germany were boycotted  on April 1, 1933 for one day in retaliation of Jewish boycott of German goods

The main reason that the Jews rule the world today is because they stick together — they organize. Wherever you find two or more Jews living in the same vicinity, you will find a Jewish organization which meddles in the affairs of the whole population.  You can read about the Holocaust memorials in America in this essay by Mark Weber: http://www.ihr.org/leaflets/holocaust_remembrance.shtml

When I visited the US Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC, I saw photographs of the German boycott of Jewish stores on April 1, 1933. The caption on one of the photos mentioned that “there was talk of an American boycott of German goods” but didn’t say whether this boycott had actually happened. An American boycott of German goods had been declared by Rabbi Stephen Wise on March 23, 1933, the same day that the German Congress voted to give Hitler dictatorial powers under the Enabling Act. The German one-day boycott was supposedly intended to stop the news stories of Nazi atrocities which were being printed in Jewish newspapers.

Every Holocaust survivor, who is out on the lecture circuit today, speaking to 5th graders in America, begins his or her talk by telling these gullible young children about how wonderful it was in Germany before that evil monster Hitler came along, and for no reason at all, started Holocausting the innocent Jews, who had never done anything wrong in the entire history of the world.  Oh, the humanity!

I was born in 1933, and when I first heard about the International boycott of German goods, I almost kicked the slats out of my crib. I assumed that every one in the world knew about the International boycott, but apparently I was wrong.

Today, it would be hard to find a class of 5th graders in America, in which a Holocaust survivor has not given a talk. I previously blogged about a speech given by a Holocaust survivor at https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2013/11/12/the-story-of-marion-blumenthal-lazan-child-survivor-of-the-holocaust/

You can hear Holocaust survivor Marion Blumenthal-Lazan speak in a YouTube video entitled “Four Perfect Pebbles,” which is also the title of her Holocaust survivor book.

This quote is from my previous blog post, cited above:

Marion [Blumenthal-Lazan] continued her talk by saying that in 1935, discrimination against the Jews in Germany began, although she does not give any hint, as to why the German people might have been against the Jews. She said that Kristallnacht was the “beginning of a massive pogrom” against the Jews, although she didn’t explain the word “pogrom,” nor did she explain the events that led up to Kristallnacht. Throughout her talk, Marion did not give the slightest reason why Jews were persecuted in Nazi Germany.

Because of the discrimination against the Jews in Germany, Marion’s family obtained “papers for America” and were scheduled to leave Germany when Kristallnacht happened on November 9, 1938. Her father was one of the Jewish men who were sent to Buchenwald, but he was soon released because he already had papers for his family to leave Germany.

In January 1939, the Blumenthal family prepared to set sail for America. In December 1939, the family went to Westerbork, in Holland, to wait for passage to America. Unfortunately, in May 1940, Germany invaded Holland and that ended Marion’s dream of going to America.

In her talk to the students, Marion did not mention that Jews were having a hard time leaving Germany because other countries in Europe would not take them. She did not explain that, even in America, there were severe restrictions on how many Jewish immigrants were allowed to come in.

[…]

Finally, Marion gets to the “gas chambers.” Every Holocaust survivor must explain why they were not sent to the gas chamber, especially when they were younger than 15 years old, while in a camp. Keep in mind that, at this point in her talk, Marion has not mentioned that Bergen-Belsen was an EXCHANGE camp. She implies that Bergen-Belsen was an “extermination camp” and since her family had not been exterminated yet, she says that they were put on one of the “three trains to the gas chamber in April 1945.”