Scrapbookpages Blog

October 23, 2014

Was General Patton an anti-Semite? Yes, “the worst, Jerry, the worst”

Filed under: Buchenwald, Holocaust, World War II — furtherglory @ 9:51 am

On my previous post about Bill O’Reilly’s latest book, entitled Killing Patton, I included a photo of the Jewish survivors of Buchenwald attending a religious service. I have pulled that photo out, and placed it on my new post today, instead.

Jewish prisoners a Buchenwald attend a religious service after the camp was liberated

Jewish prisoners at Buchenwald attend a religious service after the camp was liberated

The following quote from this website explains that General Patton was highly critical of the Jews at this religious service:

Patton’s initial impressions of the Jews were not improved when he attended a Jewish religious service at Eisenhower’s insistence. His diary entry for September 17, 1945, reads in part:

“This happened to be the feast of Yom Kippur, so they were all collected in a large, wooden building, which they called a synagogue. It behooved General Eisenhower to make a speech to them. We entered the synagogue, which was packed with the greatest stinking bunch of humanity I have ever seen. When we got about halfway up, the head rabbi, who was dressed in a fur hat similar to that worn by Henry VIII of England and in a surplice heavily embroidered and very filthy, came down and met the General . . . The smell was so terrible that I almost fainted and actually about three hours later lost my lunch as the result of remembering it.”

These experiences and a great many others firmly convinced Patton that the Jews were an especially unsavory variety of creature and hardly deserving of all the official concern the American government was bestowing on them.

This incident proves that General Patton was an anti-Semite, the worst thing that a person can be:  “the worst, Jerry, the worst.”

Bill O’Reilly’s new book has been condemned by the Jews because it does not point out that General Patton was an anti-Semite.  This review of the book makes it perfectly clear that O’Reilly, who is Catholic, committed a mortal sin by not writing that Patton was a rabid anti-Semite.

This quote from this website confirms that General Patton was definitely an anti-Semite:

Most of the Jews swarming over Germany immediately after the war came from Poland and Russia, and Patton found their personal habits shockingly uncivilized.

He was disgusted by their behavior in the camps for Displaced Persons (DP’s) which the Americans built for them and even more disgusted by the way they behaved when they were housed in German hospitals and private homes. He observed with horror that “these people do not understand toilets and refuse to use them except as repositories for tin cans, garbage, and refuse . . . They decline, where practicable, to use latrines, preferring to relieve themselves on the floor.”

He described in his diary one DP camp,

“where, although room existed, the Jews were crowded together to an appalling extent, and in practically every room there was a pile of garbage in one corner which was also used as a latrine. The Jews were only forced to desist from their nastiness and clean up the mess by the threat of the butt ends of rifles. Of course, I know the expression ‘lost tribes of Israel’ applied to the tribes which disappeared — not to the tribe of Judah from which the current sons of bitches are descended. However, it is my personal opinion that this too is a lost tribe — lost to all decency.”

When I was a child, my family lived next door to a black family, named Patton.  I was always curious about how they had gotten the name Patton.  Did the family of General Patton have slaves?  It’s possible.

On the personal website of Patton at http://www.generalpatton.com I found this quote:

[Patton’s] ancestors had fought in the Revolutionary War, the Mexican War and the Civil War, and he grew up listening to stories of their brave and successful endeavors. He attended the Virginia Military Institute for one year and went on to graduate from the United States Military Academy at West Point on June 11, 1909. He was then commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the 15th cavalry Regiment.

One thing that Bill O’Reilly’s book Killing Patton did not point out is that General Patton was an upper class person, from way back, and this could have caused him to be critical of the behavior of the Jews in the DP camps.