Scrapbookpages Blog

June 3, 2015

The Holocaust has a Facebook page

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 2:02 pm

According to my daily blog stats, around 15 people per day visit my blog as a result of being directed there by a Facebook page.

This has puzzled me for a long time and today I decided to find out what the Holocaust Facebook page looks like.  You will have to sign in to your own Facebook account to access the Holocaust page.

I took a look at the page and found the photo below, at the top of the page.

This photo was copied from the Holocaust Facebook page

This photo was copied from the Holocaust Facebook page

The above photo is quite controversial and I have written extensively about it on my scrapbookpages.com website, as well as on my blog.

The famous photo was included in the “Final Solution” section at the Dachau Museum when I visited the Memorial Site in 1998. The photo is from the Stroop Report on the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising which began on April 19, 1943.

The 1965 version of the museum at the Dachau Memorial Site, which was still there in 1998, put a lot of emphasis on the genocide of the Jews. Although Dachau was a prison for political prisoners and anti-Nazi Resistance fighters, not a death camp for the Jews, there was a large section in the 1965 museum, entitled “The Final Solution,” which showed photos from the death camps at Auschwitz and Majdanek, along with horrible pictures taken at Bergen-Belsen, Wöbbelin, and the Warsaw Ghetto.

When I visited the Dachau museum in May 2001, the Holocaust section was no longer available and construction work on the new exhibits in the west wing of the service building was in progress. The new Dachau museum which opened in May 2003 is all about the Dachau concentration camp and it does not include the photo above, nor the old section called “The Final Solution.”

The photo below is also on the Holocaust Facebook page.

Photo of rabbi which is on the Holocaust Facebook page

Photo of rabbi which is on the Holocaust Facebook page

In the photo, it appears that the soldiers in the background are laughing at the Jew in the photo, but that is not what is happening.

I wrote about this photo on my website at

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/Museum/1965Museum2.html

This quote, about the photo above, is from my website:

Begin quote:

According to the Yad Vashem museum in Jerusalem, the famous photo shown [on Facebook] was taken by a German soldier in the Polish town of Olkusz on July 31, 1940 during a reprisal action against the townspeople after a German policeman named Ernst Kaddatz was killed by members of the Polish resistance on July 16, 1940.

In the photo, Jewish men are lying face down on the ground while German Wehrmacht soldiers face the camera behind Rabbi Moshe Isaac Hangerman who is barefoot and wearing tefillin (phylacteries) as he appears to be praying.

One Jew and two Polish men were killed during this action and all the men in the town, from 15 to 60, were forced to lie on the ground from early morning until noon as punishment.

End quote

In My Humble Opinion, I do not think that the Holocaust should have a Facebook page, unless it is done by a real expert on the Holocaust.

Update June 5, 2015

I visited the Holocaust Facebook page again this morning, and the photo of the Jewish man was gone.  However, I did read these words which were put up 5 years ago:

Begin quote:

Statement Regarding Holocaust Denial & Anti-Semitism

Before positing on the wall or sharing any information on this [Facebook] page please accept the following statement from the creator of this page:

This page is not a medium for any individual to deny the historically accurate fact that the Holocaust occurred. The Holocaust happened. There is no other point of view that should be discussed on this page. Nor is this page a medium for attacking any group, race or individual. Specifically, any anti-Semitic comments or other anti-social behavior will not be tolerated and perpetrators will be reported and blocked and the content deleted.

End quote

On my blog, I allow, and even encourage, all points of view, as long as people are reasonably civil.

Chelmno, the little known “death camp”

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 10:12 am

Jewish headstones stacked  against the wall of a Museum a Chelmno

Jewish headstones stacked against the wall of a Museum at Chelmno [photo credit Alan Collins]

Quick! Name the six Nazi “death camps.”  Most people can easily name the most famous death camp: Auschwitz. Many people could also come up with the name Majdanek [Maidenek in German].  Holocaust experts would have no hesitation in naming the three Operation Reinhardt camps: Treblinka, Sobibor and Belzec.

But what about Chelmno?

The church where Jews were held overnight at Chelmno before being killed (Photo Credit: Alan Collins)

The church where Jews were held overnight at Chelmno before being killed (Photo Credit: Alan Collins)

Chelmno [Kulmhof in German] was the very first death camp, so it should be a household name, but it isn’t. Why does Chelmno get no respect?  The very first gassing of the Jews took place at Chelmno.

The Chelmno death camp has historical significance because it is the first place where the Jews were gassed in the genocide known as the Holocaust, which took the lives of six million Jews. According to Holocaust historian Martin Gilbert, the “Final Solution” began when 700 Jews from the Polish village of Kolo arrived at Chelmno on the evening of December 7, 1941 and on the following day, all of them were killed with carbon monoxide in gas vans. The victims were taken on 8 or 9 separate journeys in the gas vans to a clearing in the Rzuchowski woods near Chelmno.

In his book entitled Holocaust, Martin Gilbert wrote the following:

Begin Quote:

On 7 December 1941, as the first seven hundred Jews were being deported to the death camp at Chelmno, Japanese aircraft attacked the United States Fleet at Pearl Harbor. Unknown at that time either to the Allies or the Jews of Europe, Roosevelt’s day that would “live in infamy” was also the first day of the “final solution.”  End quote

Wikipedia has a page under the title: Chelmno extermination camp

This quote is from Wikipedia: “It [Chelmno] was built to exterminate Jews of the Łódź Ghetto and the local Polish inhabitants of Reichsgau Wartheland (Warthegau).[4] In 1943 modifications were made to the camp’s killing methods, as the reception building was already dismantled.[5]”

The following quote is from a book by the Central Commission for Investigation of German Crimes in Poland entitled “GERMAN CRIMES IN POLAND” (Warsaw, 1946, 1947):

The ashes and remains of bones [at Chelmno] were removed from the ash-pit, ground in mortars, and, at first, thrown into especially dug ditches; but later, from 1943 onwards, bones and ashes were secretly carted to Zawadki at night, and there thrown into the [Ner] river.

[…]

In the autumn of 1944 the camp in the wood [Chelmno] was completely destroyed, the crematoria being blown up, the huts taken to pieces, and almost every trace of crime being carefully removed. A Special Commission from Berlin directed, on the spot, the destruction of all the evidence of what had been done.

The word “extermination” is routinely used to mean the killing of the Jews, mainly by gassing them to death. All over the world, people have been murdered or killed, but not the Jews. The Jews were always “exterminated,” like bugs, with a poison gas called Zyklon-B, or with carbon monoxide.

You can read the official version of the Chelmno camp at http://www.theholocaustexplained.org/ks3/the-final-solution/the-death-camps/chelmno/#.VR2zL2Z9ut8

The Chelmno Schlosslager [Castle camp] had neither prisoner barracks nor factories; it’s sole purpose was to murder Jews and Roma [Gypsies] who were not capable of working at forced labor for the Nazis.

In 1939, there were around 385,000 Jews living in the Warthegau; those who could work were sent to the Lodz ghetto where they labored in textile factories which made uniforms for the German army.

On January 16, 1942, deportations from the Lodz ghetto began; records from the ghetto show that 54,990 people were deported before the final liquidation of the ghetto in August 1944.

The Jewish leader of the Lodz ghetto, Chaim Rumkowski, compiled the lists of people to be deported, although he had no knowledge that they were being sent to their deaths at Chelmno.

The gassing of the Jews at Chelmno was carried out in two separate phases. In the first phase, between December 7, 1941 and April 1943, Jews from the surrounding area and the Lodz ghetto were brought to Chelmno and killed on the day after their arrival.

Although the Nazis destroyed all records of the Chelmno camp, it is alleged that around 15,000 Jews and 5,000 Roma, who were deported from Germany, Austria, Belgium, France, Czechoslovakia and Luxembourg, were brought to Chelmno to be killed in this remote spot.

The victims of the Nazis at Chelmno also included Polish citizens and Soviet Prisoners of War. The POWs were taken directly to the nearby Rzuchowski forest where they were shot.

Wall at the spot where Jews were buried after they were killed in the forest

Wall at the spot where Jews were buried after they were killed in the forest (Photo Credit: Alan Collins)

Bodies of Jews were buried behind  the wall at Chelmno (Photo Credit: Alan Collins)

Bodies of Jews were buried behind the wall at Chelmno (Photo Credit: Alan Collins)

The Yad Vashem Museum in Jerusalem has a list of 12 names of children from Lidice who were sent to Chelmno, although other sources claim that the number of orphans from Lidice was far higher. These were the children whose parents had been killed when the Czech village of Lidice was completely destroyed in a reprisal action after the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich.

The foundation of the Castle where prisoners were held at Chelmno

The foundation of the Castle where prisoners were held at Chelmno (Photo Credit: Alan Collins)

The first phase of the liquidation of the Lodz ghetto began on June 23, 1944 and continued until July 14, 1944. Records kept by the Judenrat (Jewish leaders) in Lodz show that 7,716 Jews left the ghetto during this period of time.

Upon arrival at Chelmno, the Jews from Lodz were told that they were going to be taken to Germany to remove the rubble from the streets of German cities following the Allied bombing raids. Instead, they were loaded into vans and killed with carbon monoxide from gasoline engines. What a waste of manpower!  The German women had to remove the rubble.

In August 1944, the remaining Jews in the Lodz ghetto, except for a few who hid from the Nazis, were sent to either Chelmno or Auschwitz. A few who were sent to Auschwitz survived only because the gassing operation there stopped at the end of October 1944.

Monument to the Jews who were killed at Chelmno (Photo credit: Alan Collins)

Monument to the Jews who were killed at Chelmno (Photo credit: Alan Collins)

The Chelmno Granery (Photo Credit: Alan Collins)

The Chelmno Granery (Photo Credit: Alan Collins)

The Jewish workers, called the JudenKommando, who did the work of burning the corpses at Chelmno, were housed in the granary during the second phase of the killing at Chelmno. The granary is shown in the background of the photo above.

On the night of January 17 and 18, 1945, the SS men began taking the 47 Jewish workers out of the granary building and shooting them in groups of five, according to the two survivors, Shimon Srebnik and Mordechai Zurawski. The Jews defended themselves and two of the SS men were killed. According to the survivors, the SS men then set fire to the granary.

Monument to the Jews who were killed at Chelmno

Monument to the Jews who were killed at Chelmno (Photo Credit: Alan Collins)