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September 19, 2015

An oldie but goody: the Auschwitz II death camp

Filed under: Holocaust — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 8:10 am
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The “gate of death” at Auschwitz-Birkenau

I am putting up a quote from an old blog post that I wrote over two years ago:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2013/02/19/prize-winning-essay-written-by-an-israeli-visitor-to-auschwitz-auschwitzland-fun-for-the-whole-family/

The following quote is from the blog post, cited above.

Begin quote:

To get back to the essay, I was surprised to read this:

“We had driven by the tall guard towers, and seen the train tracks leading into the camp. These tracks exemplified the Nazis’ manipulation and duplicity. They were designed to look like they continued into the distance, to make sure the passengers on the train weren’t aware that this was their final destination; just one of the ways the prisoners were kept in control.”

End quote

The Nazis just can’t catch a break. Everything they did affronted the Jews — even the fact, that they extended the train tracks from the Auschwitz station into the Birkenau camp in 1944, offends the Jewish tourists now.

Before the tracks were extended inside the Birkenau camp, the Jews got off the trains at the Judenrampe, near the Auschwitz train station. The Judenrampe was about a mile and a half from the camp and the prisoners had to walk to the gas chambers before the tracks were extended into the camp.

The train tracks where the Jews got off the trains before the tracks were extended inside the camp

The train tracks where the Jews got off the trains before the tracks were extended inside the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp

Train tracks were extended inside the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp

Train tracks that were extended inside the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp

The photo above illustrates what the Israeli essayist said about the train tracks, which I am quoting again:

“These tracks exemplified the Nazis’ manipulation and duplicity. They were designed to look like they continued into the distance, to make sure the passengers on the train weren’t aware that this was their final destination; just one of the ways the prisoners were kept in control.”

In other words, anything and everything that ever happened in their world affronted the Jews.