Scrapbookpages Blog

September 29, 2015

The American soldiers who liberated Dachau

Yesterday, a comment was made on my blog about an American soldier, named Jimmy Gentry, who claims to have participated in the liberation of Dachau. I wrote about Jimmy Gentry on this previous blog post:  https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2010/05/23/jimmy-gentry-liberator-of-dachau-concentration-camp/

You can read about the various claims regarding the liberation of Dachau on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/DachauLiberation/LiberationDay3.html

I am answering the comment about Jimmy Gentry on my blog post today.

Begin quote of comment:

“I have no idea who this furtherglory person is, other than a faceless coward. If you are picking apart a story of a Patriot who served this country honorably, Jimmy Gentry, who also was my history teacher, then you are basically nothing more than a worm. Who are you to accuse him of lying? Apparently that’s what worms do. I know for a fact Coach Gentry would never attempt to draw attention to himself regarding his experiences during the War. You should be ashamed. For anyone coming across this blog- warning….it’s garbage journalism.”

End of comment

I went to the website of Jimmy Gentry in order to refresh my memory regarding his claim that he was a liberator of Dachau.

I copied the following quote from his website:

“Off in the distance I saw boxcars lined up with hundreds of dead bodies inside. They looked starved and tortured,” remembers Jimmy Gentry. “I asked another soldier, ‘Who are these people?’ He said, ‘They are Jews.’“

American infantryman Jimmy Gentry had seen combat at the Battle of the Bulge, but it paled in comparison to what he saw that day. “No one told us what we would find. No one explained what our mission was. We saw a wall and that was the entrance to a prison camp like I have never seen.” The camp was Dachau.
End quote from comment

Both the 45th Thunderbird Division and the 42nd Rainbow Division were advancing on April 29, 1945 toward Munich with the 20th Armored Division between them. Dachau was directly in their path, about 10 miles north of Munich.

According to Lt. Col. Felix Sparks, the commander of the 157th Infantry Regiment of the 45th Thunderbird Division, he received orders at 10:15 a.m. to liberate the Dachau camp, and the soldiers of I Company were the first to arrive at the camp around 11 a.m. on April 29, 1945.

The 101st Tank Battalion was attached to the 45th Thunderbird Division.  The 101st arrived in the town of Dachau at 9:30 a.m. on April 29th.

Model of Dachau concentration camp shows that it was right next to an SS garrison

Model of Dachau concentration camp shows that it was right next to a large SS garrison where German soldiers were stationed.  There was no wall between the SS garrison and the concentration camp.

Fence around Dachau concentration camp

Fence around the Dachau concentration camp at the time that the camp was liberated (not a wall)

Main gate into the Dachau complex which included the concentration camp

Main gate into the Dachau complex which included the SS garrison and the concentration camp

The photo above shows SS men surrendering to American soldiers who liberated Dachau.  The concentration camp is a considerable distance from this spot.

Railroad track where trains entered the SS camp, not the concentration camp

Railroad track where trains entered the SS camp; trains did not enter the concentration camp

A short railroad branch line, or rail siding, shown in the photo above, was built in 1915 from the train station in Dachau to a gunpowder and munitions factory. In July 1936 when the Nazis acquired all the property of the abandoned gun powder factory, construction began on an SS training camp and garrison, which was built next to the concentration camp that had opened in 1933.

On September 23, 1936 the industrial railroad branch line, that had formerly served the munitions factory, became the property of the Nazis. It was used primarily to bring supplies into the SS camp, but a few transport trains carrying prisoners also arrived on this railroad line, which went a short distance inside the SS camp through a railroad gate on the southwest side of the complex. The railroad tracks did not extend into the concentration camp.

A short piece of the track on this branch line has been preserved as a memorial to the prisoners who entered the Dachau complex by train. The train tracks entered the SS garrison, but not the concentration camp.

The rest of the branch railroad line was ripped out in 1985. The English translation of the sign in the photo reads “Railroad track to the former SS camp where between 1933 and 1945 tens of thousands of prisoners were transported into the concentration camp.”

Railroad track at Dachau complex

Railroad track at Dachau complex did NOT enter the concentration camp

Train with dead prisoners was parked outside the Dachau camp

Train with dead prisoners was parked outside the Dachau complex which included the concentration camp

When the former Dachau concentration camp was turned into a Memorial Site in 1965, the US Army was still occupying the former SS Army Garrison, so a new entrance for tourists was made through an opening in the fence on the east side of the camp, which is shown in my photo below. At that time, there was a high wall which separated the “Arbeit Macht Frei” gatehouse building from the US Army garrison.  That wall was not there when American soldiers liberated Dachau.

Jimmy Gentry: We saw a wall and that was the entrance to a prison camp like I have never seen.” The camp was Dachau.

Entrance into Dachau Memorial Site in 2003 was through this fence

Entrance into Dachau Memorial Site in 2003 was through this fence

There was no wall between the concentration camp and the SS garrison when Jimmy Gentry was there in 1945.  The wall was built when American soldiers occupied the Army garrison for 17 years after the end of World War II.

Prisoners entered the Dachau concentration camp by going through the SS camp on this brick road

Prisoners entered the Dachau concentration camp by going through the SS camp on this brick road

17 Comments »

  1. Seems a little nitpicky. Of course there is a difference between lying and innocently mis-remembering — it’s not at all clear which of those this is, if either.

    Of course I have no way of knowing if this guy Gentry was there when Dachau was liberated or not — I think it could fairly easily be verified by confirming what unit he belonged. (You wrote about a similar case before — Paul Parks.)

    “…We saw a wall and that was the entrance to a prison camp like I have never seen.”

    Wall, fence, here, further away — is that such a big deal?

    “Off in the distance I saw boxcars lined up with hundreds of dead bodies inside…”

    It does say “Off in the distance…” — meaning not right inside the camp.

    Anyway, perhaps you recall this:

    One of my most favorite TV shows is the series entitled Bones, which is currently in it’s 11th season.

    I emailed you privately to tell you about the incorrect use of it’s here — “it’s 11th season”. You emailed back a link explaining the usage of its v it’s. But, ahem, I know the correct usage, whereas you obviously do not, because to date you still have not corrected the error.

    Some more nitpicking there for you.

    Comment by eah — September 29, 2015 @ 1:16 pm

    • I checked again the usage of it’s and I found that you are correct, so I corrected the title of my blog post, using the word its.

      You wrote: “I think it could fairly easily be verified by confirming what unit he belonged.” Gentry belonged to the 42nd Division which arrived at Dachau in the afternoon. It was the 45th Division which arrived in the morning at Dachau.

      Thank you for pointing out that I did not mention which Division he was in. I will add that to my blog post.

      Comment by furtherglory — September 29, 2015 @ 1:40 pm

    • I have corrected my blog post, and added the information about the 45th and the 42nd divisions. The 45th arrived first and liberated the camp. Jimmy Gentry was in the 42nd division.

      Jimmy Gentry was in the battle of the Bulge, which is a really big deal. But a soldier does not get invited to speak to school children because of fighting in a famous battle. In order to be invited to speak in a classroom, you need to save a Jew. That is why Jimmy Gentry claims to have saved Jews at Dachau.

      Comment by furtherglory — September 29, 2015 @ 2:02 pm

      • That is why Jimmy Gentry claims to have saved Jews at Dachau.

        I’m not sure what he claims — the link you give says very little actually, and the mention here is the first I’ve heard of him — and I’m not sure if it’s worth it to look for more info on him.

        In order to be invited to speak in a classroom, you need to save a Jew.

        You may be right about that.

        Gentry belonged to the 42nd Division which arrived at Dachau in the afternoon.

        That’s interesting, thanks for that info — I must say your command of facts and the general history of this subject is impressive.

        Re this guy then, I think what I first said above still goes — about lying or mis-remembering — it just isn’t clear.

        On the other hand, re Paul Parks, I think it’s pretty clear he was just a liar. His appearance, along with all the other nonsense in it, is one of the things that made me decide the Spielberg documentary ‘The Last Days’ was basically filled with lies from beginning to end — and by that I mean the deliberate telling of falsehoods.

        Comment by eah — September 29, 2015 @ 2:19 pm

        • I wrote a blog post about the film entitled “The Last Days” here: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2011/05/14/spielbergs-documentary-the-last-days/

          I wrote about Paul Parks on this blog post: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/tag/dr-paul-parks/

          Comment by furtherglory — September 29, 2015 @ 4:26 pm

          • Thanks for the links. But I am not surprised — as I said, your knowledge of this topic, and the breadth of your writings on it, are impressive.

            Also, as I suggested, the film ‘The Last Days’ — or rather rebuttals to it, eg ‘The Last Days of the Big Lie’ — as well as David Cole’s short film (‘One Third of the Holocaust’ too) made an impression on me. After that, I read a great deal of revisionist writing, and later came upon this blog.

            Comment by eah — September 30, 2015 @ 12:13 am

            • My interview of Fred Leuchter first one he’s done in 20 years

              Comment by jim Rizoli — September 30, 2015 @ 7:38 am

            • Thanks for the video — it’s quite long, so initially I just watched the beginning — the first part where he talks about how his professional life was ruined is sad and revealing — sad because as he makes clear, he was not at all a revisionist before or just after he went to Auschwitz to do a technical assessment of the “gas chambers” — he became a revisionist later, helped to that decision by the way he was persecuted — revealing because it shows how viciously some Jews and Jewish groups, aided by the media (in many cases owned or strongly influenced by Jews) go after anyone who publicly damages the ‘Holocaust’ story — they are completely unprincipled — instead of simply offering a refutation, they wage what amounts to a hate campaign — they did the same to David Irving — they don’t seem to know or care how this turns some people against Jews in general, and so in the end does their cause more harm than good.

              Comment by eah — September 30, 2015 @ 11:10 am

              • You have a great site just want to let you know

                Comment by jrizoli — September 30, 2015 @ 12:03 pm

                • I’m sure fg appreciates the compliment.

                  Comment by eah — September 30, 2015 @ 1:22 pm

  2. Did you mean “We foresaw a wall “, Jimmy? Were you trying to say that you’ré a psychic medium?😉

    Comment by hermie — September 29, 2015 @ 12:53 pm

  3. While liberating concentration camps, one time I saw Forrest Gump. Did you (too)?

    Comment by Jett Rucker — September 29, 2015 @ 12:31 pm

  4. Just the typical nonsense by people that had some pretty good dreams or maybe in his case nightmares..
    Most of the camp going ons were nothing like was said by these so called “eye witnesses”.
    Most of these “eye witnesses” are wrong in what they say happened.
    People will believe all the horror stories because they fell why would an old man/woman (now) lie.
    Maybe they didn’t lie but they definitely didn’t have the right story.

    Comment by jrizoli — September 29, 2015 @ 11:56 am

    • The greatest honor that an American soldier can have is to be a liberator of a concentration camp. That is why so many veterans claim to have been liberators when they were not. Liberators are in demand as speakers in American schools, along with Holocaust survivors. The greatest honor that a goy can have is to have saved a Jew.

      Comment by furtherglory — September 29, 2015 @ 12:06 pm

      • I think the greatest honor that us goys can have his to expose the whole scam

        Comment by jrizoli — September 29, 2015 @ 2:41 pm

        • The problem is that you yourself do a very bad job exposing anything.

          Comment by HCW — September 29, 2015 @ 2:50 pm

        • The plural of goy is goyim.

          Comment by furtherglory — September 29, 2015 @ 4:28 pm


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