Scrapbookpages Blog

January 6, 2016

Jewish Degenerate art which Hitler hated

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 8:40 am
New Holocaust Museum in Skokie, Illinois

New Holocaust Museum in Skokie, Illinois

You can read about the new Holocaust museum in Skokie in this news article: http://chicagotonight.wttw.com/2016/01/05/architecture-tells-its-own-story-illinois-holocaust-museum

The architecture of the Museum is an example of the “degenerate art” which Hitler hated.

The following quote is from the news article:

Originally opened as a small storefront in Skokie in 1984, the Illinois Holocaust Museum initially came out of a protest to a neo-Nazi rally in the late 1970s. The rally never happened and instead, in 1981, the Holocaust Memorial Foundation of Illinois was formed, largely via the efforts of local survivors.

I previously blogged about “degenerate art” which Hitler hated: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2010/04/17/entartete-kunst-degenerate-art/

My photo of artwork at Dachau

My 1998 photo of artwork at Dachau Memorial site

 

My photo of the back side of the Dachau monument

My photo of the back side of the Dachau monument, taken in the rain

The point that I am trying to make here, dear readers, is that there was a vast difference between the thinking of the Jews and the thinking of Hitler and the Nazis.  Hitler wanted the Jews out of Germany because he wanted a country for the German people, not a country for Jews.

This quote is from the beginning of the news article, cited above:

Like Star Wars, the space we’re currently standing in has physical “light” and “dark” sides, says my tour guide, a petite blonde who grew up in Chicago and “geeks out” over all things architecture.

She’s referring to a critical component of the overarching design of the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center, a building designed by Chicago architect Stanley Tigerman which opened to the public in 2009. The light and dark refer to the architectural experience visitors are meant to have as they move through the museum, beginning with a stark industrial feel at the onset, ultimately moving towards rounded white rooms flooded with natural light. At the time it opened, Chicago Tribune architectural critic Blair Kamin called it both “moving and flawed.”

Today, we’ve just missed the school tours and the building is relatively quiet, save for TVs in the exhibits, many of which contain survivors talking, remembering.

11 Comments »

  1. Well if they don’t watch it,”never again” will become “it’s happening again”. This shit don’t seem to come across as memorials anymore. It seems more like “f–k you. We (the Jews) own Germany now. We’ll do whatever we damn well please. F–k denial laws. Tell the German government to go to Walmart . Walmart sells balls. Tell them to buy a pair and put their foot down on all this nonsense

    Comment by Tim — February 26, 2016 @ 4:58 pm

  2. Q. Do you suppose the people funding these monuments receive income-tax deductions for their outlays?
    A. Yes if they are charitable donations to 501 c(3) non-profit organization which all Holocaust related organizations usually are.

    Q. Or do you suppose the funding is just extracted directly from non-voluntary taxpayers who are simply not informed that they are funding these monuments with their hard-earned tax dollars?
    A. Funding is also extracted from non-voluntary taxpayers using an incaluable variety of legal ploys. Think of the cost of kosher certification passed on to non-Jewish consumers.

    Holocaust memorialization is a multi-billion dollar business which is why museums, memorials, study centers are popping up like mushrooms everywhere in America and Europe where the Holocaust did NOT happen. I wanted order a new book about the history of filming the camps but balked at the $115 price tag. Why so high? It was a college level text book and probably published by a Jewish owned text book publishing company. Holocaust courses are mandatory in many state elementary, and secondary school curriculums. Every academic year either the students, or the schools need to purchase new copies of The Diary of Anne Frank or Elie Wiesel’s Night for these courses.
    .
    “If you want a vision of the future, imagine a (sterling silver) boot (shaped like an engraved Torah scroll holder) stamping on a human face – forever.” – George Orwell

    Comment by who dares wings — January 7, 2016 @ 11:31 pm

  3. The German Chancellor ironically of Polish background nee Kasner admits that one of her main motivations for replacing the German people in their homeland is guilt for the Holocaust . The MSM this week initially tried to cover up the reports of mass assaults at Cologne railway station by Ms Merkels new Germans, however they weren’t successful.
    http://www.thelocal.de/20160104/refugees-blamed-for-mass-sexual-assault-in-cologne

    Comment by peter — January 7, 2016 @ 2:00 am

    • Fear of being accused of promoting Rechtextremismus — ie being called a (neo-)Nazi = Jew killer — also keeps many otherwise concerned Germans silent — you can literally see them squirm and grimace in discomfort when the subject comes up — but the subject is increasingly hard to avoid — “Wir schaffen das” doesn’t really cut it anymore.

      Comment by eah — January 7, 2016 @ 2:12 am

  4. Silhouette versions of Nandor Glid’s horrible sculpture now appear on buses that drive about Dachau town and the surrounding area. So now it’s not just visitors to the memorial that have to look at it.

    I took this photo inside one of the buses in April 2014:

    Comment by The Black Rabbit of Inlé — January 6, 2016 @ 6:26 pm

    • now appear on buses

      I think putting patterns on windows in public transit is also done in part to frustrate sprayers, who use sharp objects to scratch the windows — these patterns make their ‘art’ stand out less — of course they do choose the pattern — it is usually something identified with the city — ein Wahrzeichen.

      Foto of the pattern used on subway car windows in Berlin:

      Comment by eah — January 6, 2016 @ 9:11 pm

  5. Examples of Nazi art:
    http://research.calvin.edu/german-propaganda-archive/politart-thumb.htm
    I honestly don’t know which is worse, the degenerate art or what passed for art by the Nazis.
    I myself don’t really enjoy art displays or museums. I’m more of a natural history museum or military museum kind of person.
    Here’s what I do find funny:
    The Nazis opened up a “Museum of Degenerate Art” I believe in Berlin. Shirer described it as a ramshackle old building that you had to enter through the alleyway. On the day Shirer came to visit it was packed but the other museum filled with Nazi art was empty. This embarrassed the Nazi government so they closed the degenerate art museum down. I guess the Germans liked the degenerate art.
    Funny, eh?
    Jeff

    Comment by HAD — January 6, 2016 @ 3:06 pm

  6. The Canadian Capital, Ottawa, is in the process of building one of these infamous “holocaust memorial-museums” that seem to pop-up everywhere across the United States.

    And its design is wonderfully satanic – a typical example of modern Zionist architecture. Its plan takes the form of a giant irregular-shaped six pointed star, each point of which ends in painfully acute elongated angles. The structure is entirely built with reinforced concrete (which of course will weather badly), and the truncated walls have no aesthetic appeal, as they lead nowhere, often clash or collide with one another, and slope and curve in an entirely haphazard manner.

    What the good folk of Canada have done to earn this monstrosity in their nation’s Capital – I really can’t imagine. But it would seem that when a committee of wealthy and powerful Jews snap their fingers, then this is the end result.

    Comment by Talbot — January 6, 2016 @ 2:24 pm

  7. Regarding Jewish selected art, just say no. The Jewish motivated and instigated so-called art of the 20s was a seeming attempt to sabotage, tearing down the moral fabric of an already demonized and terrorized Germany.

    Comment by Diane King — January 6, 2016 @ 10:02 am

  8. Do you suppose the people funding these monuments receive income-tax deductions for their outlays?

    Or do you suppose the funding is just extracted directly from non-voluntary taxpayers who are simply not informed that they are funding these monuments with their hard-earned tax dollars?

    In Miami Beach, the city DONATED expensive/valuable land for the Holocaust memorial that besmirches the cityscape. Taxpayers didn’t dare squawk (those who might have opposed it).

    Comment by Jett Rucker — January 6, 2016 @ 9:16 am


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