Scrapbookpages Blog

March 6, 2016

Glen Beck compares Donald Trump to Adolf Hitler

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 9:00 am

What is the worst possible thing that you can say about a person?  Most people would say that any comparison to Adolf Hitler is the worst possible insult that can be made.  It is not surprising that Glen Beck is now in deep doo doo for comparing Donald Trump to Adolf Hitler, even if it was actually George Stephanopoulos who put these words into Glen’s mouth.

You can read about it, and see the video that shows what actually happened, at http://dailycaller.com/2016/03/06/glenn-beck-warns-that-trump-is-adolf-hitler-video/

Donald Trump

Donald Trump

Adolf Hitler

Adolf Hitler

The following quote is from the news article cited above:

Begin quote

Beck argued, “The GOP has one last chance to listen to the people. And the people that, and I understand it, they’re very, very angry because the GOP did not listen the first time around. They didn’t listen to the Ron Paul people who are way ahead of the curve. Then the Tea Party people and they rubbed our nose in it. And they are tired. And they have created Donald Trump.”

“The people are speaking clearly. And there’s two ways to go: anger and nationalism, which has been done before in history,” Beck said. “And you can go for nationalism, you can go for anger–” has been done before in history.”

End quote

The photo below shows Hitler at the start of his career as a nationalist.

Nurnberg26

The following quote is from my scrapbookpages.com website:

Because of the Nazi program of nationalism, the German people had regained their self respect after the humiliating Treaty of Versailles, which Germany was forced to sign at the end of World War I. They now had great pride in their ethnicity and their country. No people in the world were more patriotic than the Germans in 1936 and no other world leader had the total dedication to his country that Adolph Hitler had.

The ordinary Germans were satisfied with their lives and had no reason to fear the concentration camps or the Gestapo. Hitler was a hero to the 127 million ethnic Germans throughout Europe, whom he wanted to unite into the Greater German Empire, a dream that had been discussed in his native Austria for over 50 years. In less than four years, this dream would be accomplished when Austria, parts of Poland that had formerly been German territory, Luxembourg, the French provinces of Alsace and Lorraine, and the Sudetenland were combined with Germany to form the Greater German Reich.

In 1936, Hitler was more loved and admired than all the other world leaders put together. He was also the only world leader who was actively helping the Zionists with their plan to reclaim Palestine as their country.

While America and the rest of Europe were still in the depths of the depression caused by the stock market crash in October 1929, Germany had stabilized its economy and had virtually eliminated unemployment. Unlike the other countries in Europe in 1936, Nazi Germany was doing well, thanks in part to American investment capital. Many American businessmen, led by auto maker Henry Ford, supported Hitler and his Fascist form of government. Other prominent Americans who supported Hitler included Joseph P. Kennedy (the father of President John F. Kennedy), and Prescott Bush (the grandfather of President George W. Bush) and Charles Lindbergh.

Meanwhile, the American government was drifting to the liberal left; Communist refugees like playwright Bertold Brecht and Jewish refugees like Albert Einstein were flocking to America and their influence was strong in American politics. In the 1936 presidential election in America, Al Smith, who had run as the Democratic candidate in 1928 against Herbert Hoover, accused fellow Democrat President Roosevelt of being a Communist.

Hitler had thumbed his nose at the Versailles Treaty by stopping the payment of reparations to France and Great Britain, and a massive program of industrialization had restored the country to full employment, compared to the 20% unemployment in America in 1936. Roosevelt had copied many of the social welfare programs in Germany, including Social Security, but America was still struggling to recover from the depression.

The workers in Nazi Germany enjoyed unprecedented social benefits such as paid vacations under the Strength Through Joy program (Kraft durch Freude). Factory workers listened to classical music as they worked, and took showers before going home. In order to demonstrate their importance to the country, workers were allowed to march in Nazi parades, carrying shovels on their shoulders just like the soldiers who marched with their rifles.

Everything in Nazi Germany was clean and orderly; there were no slums; the trains ran on time. By 1938, the crime rate was at an all-time low because repeat offenders were being sent to a concentration camp after they had completed their second sentence. Anyone who did not have a permanent address and some visible means of support was hauled off to the Dachau concentration camp and put to work.

End quote from my website

3 Comments »

  1. Reductio ad hitlerum is very commonplace in America. But the overuse of that ‘argument’ is dangerous for the Zionist & pro-Zionist elites, because if everybody is a Hitler, that implies Hitler was not as terrible and extraordinary as claimed. In the same vein, the Zionists hate when animal rights organizations call meat industry or the euthanasia of homeless animals ‘a holocaust’.

    Comment by hermie — March 6, 2016 @ 9:00 pm

  2. Now don’t get me wrong…I love Trump. But…he would have to stand on top of Trump Tower to kiss the Fuhrers ass

    Comment by Schlageter — March 6, 2016 @ 3:43 pm

  3. People still listen to Beck? I think Becks just wanting to get close enough to Cruz,so he can give him a handjob. I’d rather listen to Crispy creme ( Gov Christie) or Jeb Bush before I listen to Beck

    Comment by Tim — March 6, 2016 @ 2:21 pm


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