Scrapbookpages Blog

April 19, 2016

Belsen had forced much of the world to confront the undeniable reality of the Final Solution

Filed under: Germany, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 10:09 am
Famous photo of a man struggling to survive at Bergen-Belsen

Famous photo of a man struggling to survive at Bergen-Belsen

I am four days late, and probably four dollars short, in writing about the 71st anniversary of the day, April 15, 1945, when Bergen-Belsen was voluntarily turned over to the British near the end of World War II because of a typhus epidemic in the camp. British soldiers did not liberate the camp, as news stories would have you believe. The Belsen camp was voluntarily turned over to the British.

Famous photo shows a Jewish soldier driving a bulldozer

Famous still photo from a movie shows a Jewish soldier driving a bulldozer to shove bodies into a mass grave

The title of my blog post today is a quote from a news article with the headline The Legal Lessons of Bergen-Belsen, which you can read in full here.

The news article begins with the following quote:

Begin quote

Editor’s note: The following is a version of the speech delivered by the author on Sunday, April 17, 2016, at a ceremony in Germany marking the 71st anniversary of the liberation of Bergen-Belsen.

“Earth Conceal Not the Blood Shed on Thee!”

These words from the Book of Job are engraved on the Jewish monument that my father, Josef Rosensaft, unveiled here in the midst of the mass graves of Bergen-Belsen on April 15, 1946—the first anniversary of the liberation of this notorious Nazi concentration camp. Only one year earlier, thousands of corpses had borne mute witness to the mass murder that had been perpetrated in this place, and the photographs of the human devastation encountered at Belsen by British troops had forced much of the world to confront the undeniable reality of the Final Solution.

It is eerily symbolic, therefore, that exactly 70 years ago today, on April 17, 1946, Alfred Rosenberg, Nazi Party’s chief ideologist and pseudo-philosopher, was being cross-examined before the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg about the precise meaning and context of the German term “Ausrottung,” meaning “extermination,” that he had used with respect to Jews in war-time communications with Hitler. Rosenberg also testified that day that he considered the shooting of hostages to be “an accepted act of reprisal.”

End quote

You can read about Bergen-Belsen on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/BergenBelsen/ConcentrationCamp.html

Note that the news article gives a link to my website to show the monument of Alfred Rosenberg.