Scrapbookpages Blog

May 15, 2016

The Jewish boy who was saved from the gas chamber because of his good penmenship

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: — furtherglory @ 8:22 am

Ernest Michel on a trip to Auschwitz

Ernest Michel on a trip to Auschwitz-Birkenau in 1983 [photo credit: Robert A. Cummins]

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/15/nyregion/ernest-michel-who-survived-auschwitz-and-led-jewish-charities-dies-at-92.html?_r=0

Begin quote

Ernest Michel survived the Auschwitz death camp because of a calligraphy course he had taken at his father’s insistence. Having been expelled with other Jewish students from German public schools, he needed to develop a skill, his father had told him.

He did just that: His penmanship became flawless, and the Nazis put it to use at Auschwitz, sparing him from the gas chambers. They conscripted him in a cynical scheme to falsify the death certificates of his fellow inmates, hoping to hide the actual cause of death: extermination. That they enlisted a Jew to do their dissembling was doubly grievous.

End quote

Bad Nazis! They refused to put the real cause of death [extermination] on the Jewish death certificates.  At the very least, the Nazis should have put “gassed to death with Zyklon-B” on the Jewish death certificates.

There might be some young people reading this, who do not know the meaning of the word penmanship, so I will attempt to explain it.

Back in the olden days, when your great-grandfather was in grammar  school, students used to write in cursive handwriting with a fountain pen, or a pencil, on a piece of paper that had 3 lines on it to indicate where the top and the bottom of a cursive letter should go.

Good handwriting was the mark of an educated person, who had completed the eighth grade. For example, my mother completed the 8th grade at the age of 13. Her teacher was her 14 year old cousin, who had completed her 8th grade education the previous year. My father only went to school as far as the 4th grade; as an adult, he could neither read nor write.

Ernest Michael had been educated up to the sixth grade, and this saved his life because he was able to write in beautiful cursive handwriting.

The news article continues with this quote:

Begin quote

Mr. Michel (pronounced mish-ELL) died on May 7 in Manhattan at 92. [He was born in July 1923.] His account of mechanically forging the death certificates was one of many he would tell in his decades of bearing witness — in writing and public speaking — to the horrors he had observed beginning in 1936, when he was 13 and barred from public school by Nazi racial codes. He never received a formal education beyond the sixth grade.

He was barely 20 when he was given the writing task at Auschwitz. He was in the camp infirmary, being treated for a head wound inflicted by a prison guard during a beating, when an aide asked whether any of the inmates had good handwriting. Mr. Michel volunteered.

“It didn’t take me long to figure out what I was doing,” he wrote in his 1993 memoir, “Promises to Keep: One Man’s Journey Against Incredible Odds.”

“The list contained the names of those who were shipped to Birkenau and the gas chamber,” he wrote. “The Nazis, with their usual efficiency and attention to detail, kept records of all inmates sent to be gassed. Only nobody died being gassed to death. They all died by being ‘weak of the body’ – ‘Koerperschwaeche’ – or from ‘Herzschlag’ – ‘heart attack.’ ”

End quote

The following quote is also from the news article:

Begin quote

Mr. Michel had been put to work building a synthetic rubber plant [Monowitz?] when the beating occurred that sent him to the infirmary. He later became a medical aide there himself and saw Dr. Josef Mengele performing his horrific experiments on prisoners [at Monowitz?]

He was evacuated from the camp on Jan. 18, 1945, as Russian troops approached. It was on a forced march between camps a few weeks before the war ended that he and two other prisoners escaped.

Remaining in Germany immediately after the war, Mr. Michel covered the Nuremberg war crime trials for a German news agency. He insisted on the byline “Special Correspondent Ernst Michel, Auschwitz No. 104995,” the number that was branded on an arm. He sat not far from the defendants.

“There were times when I wanted nothing more than to jump up and grab them all by the throat,” he said.

End quote

Only one more quote from this news article, I am [literally] finished:

Begin quote

One day, a lawyer for Hermann Göring, the Luftwaffe commander and the founder of the Gestapo, said that Göring wanted to meet the correspondent who was a former concentration camp inmate.

“So we went to Göring’s cell and the door opened,” Mr. Michel recalled. “Göring smiled, came up to me and wanted to shake my hand. At that moment I suddenly froze. I couldn’t move. I looked at his hand, his face, and then his hand again — and then just turned round. I couldn’t do it. I just couldn’t speak to this man. Not one single word.”

End quote

 

12 Comments »

  1. Just a bit about the writing:

    “There might be some young people reading this, who do not know the meaning of the word penmanship, so I will attempt to explain it.

    Back in the olden days, when your great-grandfather was in grammar school, students used to write in cursive handwriting with a fountain pen, or a pencil, on a piece of paper that had 3 lines on it to indicate where the top and the bottom of a cursive letter should go.”

    A fountain pen! I think I got one when I was 16 or so. We used a ‘penholder’ and a nib, called crown nib. In the school desks there were ink wells that were filled every few days by the school concierge. So after writing a word you dipped your nib in the ink and wrote the next word.

    I doubt very much that a certificate was in cursive script. Wouldn’t it be in Gothic script?
    And I don’t believe a word of his stories. There is the omnipresent Mengele again. Don’t make me laugh. Dr Mengele seems to have met all of these so called survivors.

    Comment by Dr Kim — May 16, 2016 @ 2:58 am

    • Dr. Mengele was everywhere he must have been a busy guy who probably never slept if you listen to most Holohucksters give their cry me a river survival stories they all met Mengele even in the camps he wasn’t in…. I guess he was omnipresent more important than God.

      JR

      Comment by jrizoli — May 16, 2016 @ 7:05 am

      • You wrote: “Dr. Mengele was everywhere he must have been a busy guy who probably never slept…”

        One of my very first blog posts was about Dr. Mengele:
        https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2010/11/30/dr-josef-mengele-dont-it-make-my-brown-eyes-blue/

        My personal opinion is that Dr. Mengele was a nice guy who was loved by everyone, so he had to be demonized by the Jews.

        Comment by furtherglory — May 16, 2016 @ 10:04 am

        • I agree about Dr. Mengele he was probably one of the best doctors they are trying to help everybody out and everybody knew of him so when it comes time to put the blame on somebody they had to put the blame on somebody they knew well so Dr. Mengele got the call for that, lucky him…
          Of course the Jews with all the stories have made him out to be Dr. Frankenstein because they had to have a bad guy in their horror Disneyland story and since there were no bad guys they had to take a good guy to make a bad guy out of him.

          JR

          Comment by jrizoli — May 16, 2016 @ 11:14 am

      • Wow! So the Hebs say he’s everywhere . Gee wiz! He must’ve been the “man about town”. I bet he probably hung out at “The Stork Club”. Wow! How’s a man like that,gonna tend to all those ghastly experiments he was supposed to be doing?

        Comment by Tim — May 19, 2016 @ 10:04 am

    • You wrote: “In the school desks there were ink wells that were filled every few days by the school concierge. So after writing a word you dipped your nib in the ink and wrote the next word.”

      In my day, a “fountain pen” had a long tube inside, which was filled with ink from the ink well in the desk. You could then write for several days without filling your pen again.

      The students in my school used to collect fountain pens and trade them back and forth during recess. A Parker fountain pen was very valuable back then.

      Comment by furtherglory — May 16, 2016 @ 10:26 am

      • Hey Doc. Bet you wish you had some of those pens. I know somebody that collects pens. This one pen of theirs sticks out in my mind. It’s a Waterman (I think that’s the name). It was made in 1918. My buddy picked it up at the auction for $325.00. He said he practically stole it at that price. This guys a fanatic when it comes to pens. He keeps them locked up with his guns,in his gun safe.

        Comment by Tim — May 19, 2016 @ 10:16 am

  2. “There were times when I wanted nothing more than to jump up and grab them all by the throat”.

    Yeah – I know exactly how you felt, Ernest, me old mate. I sometimes have this overwhelming urge to jump and grab all these lying holocaust survivors by the throat too.

    But I guess we’ll never know now whether Ernest went on to visit von Ribbentrop in his cell after he gave Hermann Goering the cold shoulder. He could have asked Ribbentrop what’s the best champagne to crack open in order to celebrate Holohoax Day each year. I believe the former German Ambassador to the Court of St James in London was a champagne salesman before becoming an ardent follower of the Fuehrer.

    Comment by Talbot — May 15, 2016 @ 11:33 am

  3. How silly to devise alleged genocidal code words AND let the alleged Jewish decoders go free to tell the world about it!! And how silly to devise such alleged code words and tell some Jews about it in the first place! How even sillier to believe in such obviously-fraudulent stories…

    And where was this alleged decoder immediately after the war, when the IMT was having hard times at Nuremberg trying to make people believe in its convenient trick of alleged Nazi genocidal code words and euphemisms?

    Comment by hermie — May 15, 2016 @ 10:41 am

  4. Okay. The Jews wanna say(what ever the number is today ) died,then round up all these death certificates. Shouldn’t be hard to do. Get the “false” crertificates and start counting . You know I only ever see pictures of one or two Hebs in a photograph. If these places are so “sacred”,wouldn’t the Jews be coming in masses? I’m surprised someone hasn’t put together,tour packages,for all the Jew survivors to come visit these places. This would be a golden opportunity for the survivors. If they get lucky they can be there the same day,that a high school class is on a field trip

    Comment by Tim — May 15, 2016 @ 9:51 am

  5. Of course only a jewish boy would be able to do such penmanship;we all know that Germans have terrible handwriting.

    Secondly I wonder why, when engaged in the despicable pursuit of total genocide of the jews, any death certificate was needed? Who would get this and make use of it? After all all the jews would be done to death so who would have need of it?

    Comment by Mr B — May 15, 2016 @ 9:22 am

  6. Oh vey! Here we go again.

    JR

    Comment by jrizoli — May 15, 2016 @ 8:53 am


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