Scrapbookpages Blog

May 19, 2016

So you want the truth about the Holocaust? Better go to Wikipedia

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 8:07 am

People who are reading my blog should know that I am writing Holocaust denial, which is against the law in 20 countries. If you want to know the truth about the Holocaust, you had better go to Wikipedia, which is strictly kosher.

The photo below is shown on the Wikipedia page about the Holocaust: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Holocaust

Mother with baby is being sent to the right

Mother with baby was sent to the right upon arrival at Birkenau

Excuse me! I don’t think that the photo above is appropriate to illustrate the Holocaust.

The photo above shows a train that has just arrived inside the Birkenau camp. In the background, you can see the famous tower of death.

According to Holocaust true history, mothers with babies were sent to the left, to their death.This woman and her baby are being sent to the right.

The prisoners, who are standing on the left, in the photo are Sonderkommando Jews who helped the Nazis. The Sonderkommando Jews served for three months and were then allegedly killed, but a new group of Sonderkomdo Jews took over for the next three months.

The last group of Sonderkomdo Jews were allowed to march out of the camp and were saved;  they testified, in war crimes trials, about the crimes committed by the Nazis.

The following quote is from Wikipedia:

The Holocaust (from the Greek ὁλόκαυστος holókaustos: hólos, “whole” and kaustós, “burnt”),[2] also known as the Shoah (Hebrew: השואה, HaShoah, “the catastrophe”), was a genocide in which Adolf Hitler‘s Nazi Germany and its collaborators killed about six million Jews.[3] The victims included 1.5 million children[4] and represented about two-thirds of the nine million Jews who had resided in Europe.[5] Some definitions of the Holocaust include the additional five million non-Jewish victims of Nazi mass murders, bringing the total to about 11 million. Killings took place throughout Nazi Germany and German-occupied territories.[6]

From 1941 to 1945, Jews were systematically murdered in one of the deadliest genocides in history, which was part of a broader aggregate of acts of oppression and killings of various ethnic and political groups in Europe by the Nazi regime.[7] Every arm of Germany’s bureaucracy was involved in the logistics and the carrying out of the genocide. Other victims of Nazi crimes included ethnic Poles, Soviet citizens and Soviet POWs, other Slavs, Romanis, communists, homosexuals, Jehovah’s Witnesses and the mentally and physically disabled.[8][9] A network of about 42,500 facilities in Germany and German-occupied territories was used to concentrate victims for slave labor, mass murder, and other human rights abuses.[10] Over 200,000 people are estimated to have been Holocaust perpetrators.[11]

The persecution and genocide were carried out in stages, culminating in what Nazis termed the “Final Solution to the Jewish Question” (die Endlösung der Judenfrage), an agenda to exterminate Jews in Europe. Initially the German government passed laws to exclude Jews from civil society, most prominently the Nuremberg Laws of 1935. Nazis established a network of concentration camps starting in 1933 and ghettos following the outbreak of World War II in 1939. In 1941, as Germany conquered new territory in eastern Europe, specialized paramilitary units called Einsatzgruppen murdered around two million Jews and “partisans”,[clarification needed] often in mass shootings. By the end of 1942, victims were being regularly transported by freight trains to extermination camps where, if they survived the journey, most were systematically killed in gas chambers. This continued until the end of World War II in Europe in April–May 1945.

End quote from Wikipedia

I wrote about the “Final Solution to the Jewish Question” on this blog post: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/tag/final-solution-of-the-jewish-question-in-europe/

Note this part of the Holocaust quote from Wikipedia’s page:

Begin quote

Other victims of Nazi crimes included ethnic Poles, Soviet citizens and Soviet POWs, other Slavs, Romanis, communists, homosexuals, Jehovah’s Witnesses and the mentally and physically disabled.[8][9]

End quote

I don’t believe that Romanis [gypsies] and homosexuals were deliberately killed by the Nazis. Nor do I believe that communists and Jehovah’s Witnesses were killed.  Mentally and physically disabled people were, in fact, killed at Hartheim castle, but I do not consider this to be part of the Holocaust.

The Wikipedia page continues with this quote:

The persecution and genocide were carried out in stages, culminating in what Nazis termed the “Final Solution to the Jewish Question” (die Endlösung der Judenfrage), an agenda to exterminate Jews in Europe. Initially the German government passed laws to exclude Jews from civil society, most prominently the Nuremberg Laws of 1935. Nazis established a network of concentration camps starting in 1933 and ghettos following the outbreak of World War II in 1939. In 1941, as Germany conquered new territory in eastern Europe, specialized paramilitary units called Einsatzgruppen murdered around two million Jews and “partisans”,[clarification needed] often in mass shootings. By the end of 1942, victims were being regularly transported by freight trains to extermination camps where, if they survived the journey, most were systematically killed in gas chambers. This continued until the end of World War II in Europe in April–May 1945.

 

Primo Levi’s famous poem “If this is a man”

Filed under: Holocaust — furtherglory @ 6:33 am

The following words were written by Primo Levi, a Jew who suffered, during World War II, in the Nazi work camp known as Monowitz, aka Auschwitz III.

The title of this poem is “If this is a man”.

You who live safe
In your warm houses,
You who find, returning in the evening,
Hot food and friendly faces:
Consider if this is a man
Who works in the mud
Who does not know peace
Who fights for a scrap of bread
Who dies because of a yes or a no.
Consider if this is a woman,
Without hair and without name
With no more strength to remember,
Her eyes empty and her womb cold
Like a frog in winter.
Meditate that this came about:
I commend these words to you.
Carve them in your hearts
At home, in the street,
Going to bed, rising;
Repeat them to your children,
Or may your house fall apart,
May illness impede you,
May your children turn their faces from you.