Scrapbookpages Blog

May 20, 2016

“one of the guards’ duties at Auschwitz was to ensure prisoners did not leave the camp alive”

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 1:21 pm
The gate into the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp

My photo of the gate into the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp

The title of my blog post comes from a line in a news article, which you can read in full at http://www.dw.com/en/prosecutors-demand-six-years-for-former-auschwitz-guard/a-19273851

The following quote is from the news article, cited above:

Begin quote

The court heard how [German] guards were aware of the exterminations taking place at Auschwitz, and how one of the guards’ duties was to ensure prisoners did not leave the camp alive.

[…]

German state prosecutors have asked judges to sentence a former Nazi guard to six years in prison. Reinhold Hanning, now 94, is accused of complicity in the murder of at least 100,000 prisoners in the concentration camp.

End quote

Obviously, Reinold Hanning failed in his duties at Auschwitz. His duty was to insure that no one left the Auschwitz camp alive. There are thousands of Holocaust survivors still alive today, so Hanning did not do his job properly.

The problem is that Reinhold Hanning is a nice old man, who is trying his best to placate the Jews, but his best isn’t good enough.

If Hanning goes to prison for six years, he will never see the light of day again. He’s 94 now and will be 100 when he gets out.  However, I believe that he will serve out his time in a nursing home. There will be other German criminals in the nursing home with him and they can talk about the Jews that they sent to the gas chamber, and the ones who got away and are now sending old men to prison.

The following quote is also from the news article:

Begin quote

The case is based on complaints from 40 plaintiffs from Hungary, Israel, Canada, Britain, the US and Germany. Hanning is accused of facilitating the deaths of at least 100,000 people during his time as a guard at the camp.

Roughly 1 million people, most of them Jews, are believed to have died at the Auschwitz camp, set up in German-occupied Poland by Adolf Hitler’s Nazi regime. The victims typically died either of starvation or in gas chambers.

Hanning told judges that his stepmother had urged him to join the SS.

Where was his real mother? No one could steer Hanning right, but Mama tried, Mama tried. [lyrics of an old song]

The quote from the news article continues with this:

Begin quote

During the hearing, which began in February last year, the 94-year-old admitted that he was an SS guard at Auschwitz and knew about the mass murders which were taking place there. During this admission, Hanning also expressed shame and asked for forgiveness.

End quote

Good luck with getting forgiveness from the Jews!  The motto of the Jews is “Never forgive, never forget.”

My photo of the ruins of one of the gas chambers

My photo of the ruins of one of the gas chambers at Auschwitz-Birkenau

Were there really homicidal gas chambers at Auschwitz? Yes, you had better believe it if you don’t want to go to prison for the crime of Holocaust denial.

 

Do the Jews own Berlin?

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 8:28 am

In answer to my question:

Yes, the Jews do own Berlin; they think that they are entitled to have their own city in Germany, a country which they believe that they are entitled to rule.

My 2000 photo of the beginning of the consruction of the Jewsish memrial in Berlin

My year 2000 photo of the beginning of construction of the Jewish memorial in Berlin

2006 photo of Berlin memorial to Jews Photo credit: Bonnie M. Harris

2006 photo of Berlin memorial to Jews Photo credit: Bonnie M. Harris

I have a whole section on my website about Berlin: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Berlin2002/index.html

Aerial view of Jewish Museum in Berlin, on the left

Aerial view of Jewish Museum in Berlin, on the left

My photo of the front of the Jewish Museum in Berlin

My photo of the front of the Jewish Museum in Berlin

This morning, I read a news article about Jews in Berlin: http://www.jewishjournal.com/an_israeli_refugee_in_berlin/item/my_inspiring_encounter_with_l.a._holocaust_survivor_joshua_kaufman

The following quote is from the news article, cited above:

Begin quote

After Shabbat, I Googled “Joshua Kaufman” and his name is, indeed, all over German and American press outlets, like NBC News.

Just that day Yehoshua [Joshua] was denied the opportunity to testify at a Nazi war criminal trial against a former Nazi SS guard. The judge’s refusal, citing lack of necessity for the testimony, was an emotional and physical slap. Yehoshua had hurt his knee a few weeks earlier but decided he must travel to Germany to seek justice. He had prepared his words, how he had lugged dead bodies out of Auschwitz gas chambers, pulling them apart as they stuck together during their murder. He was 15 at the time, and volunteering for such gruesome work helped keep him alive.

End quote

Poor Yehoshua! I can see it all now.

As soon as the Jews had steeped out of the cattle cars, on the train that had brought them to Auschwitz-Birkenau, those mean ole Nazis were shouting: “Who wants to volunteer to work in the gas chambers, pulling the bodies apart? This will be gruesome work, but it will keep you alive. Everyone who is 15 or younger will be killed immediately in the gas chamber, but if you agree to work in the gas chamber, pulling the bodies apart, we might let you live for a few months.”

[The photo above is included with the article. It shows Joshau Kaufmand and his two daughters in Berlin.]

The news article continues with this quote:

Begin quote

As Rachel wrote on Facebook: “He [Joshau] was disappointed and shocked that he was not able to speak in court, but he always looks for the positive and lives his life learning how to adapt to situations that don’t always go as planned. He doesn’t hate anyone and doesn’t want anyone to feel sorry for him. He is grateful for this once in a lifetime opportunity. He entered the court proudly with his daughters by his side, self-confident knowing that Israel is our country and we are no longer homeless or hopeless. He was called on a mission and he went wholeheartedly. Yes, it didn’t go the way he expected, but sometimes in life you gain more from those experiences then you could have ever imagined.”