Scrapbookpages Blog

May 21, 2016

Middle school students create a gas chamber for an art project

Filed under: Holocaust — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 12:09 pm

The following quote is from this news article:

http://qctimes.com/news/local/making-a-difference-in-art-class-students-gain-new-perspective/article_7a4ae39f-df01-5de2-84f5-1dfda09fdab8.html

Begin quote:

Over the past few months, students have been studying the World War II and the Holocaust period in history, science and English classes. So, [Alexandria] DeLong pitched the idea of creating a life-like gas chamber in art class.

“It’s a pretty out there statement — let’s make a gas chamber,” DeLong said.

The 24-year-old art teacher, who’s finishing out her first year at the middle school, had the students hooked — they brainstormed fog machines, imitation gas lights and barbed wire. They talked about how to act out a gas-chamber scene and how each taped figure should look.

For students, the fun of playing with packing tape was met [with] a serious tone.

“It makes us think about the awfulness of the Holocaust and be like, yes that actually happened,” Hughes said. “Would you rather read about it in a book or see it with your eyes?”

Figures made by students are supposed to look like people inside a gas chamber

Figures made of tape, by students, are supposed to look like people inside a gas chamber. This photo, by Kevin E. Schmidt, is available for purchase.

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote
With coffee cup in hand Monday morning, Alexandria DeLong doled out some haunting instructions for her seventh-graders at Bettendorf Middle School.

“This one needs to look more half-dead, don’t you think?” DeLong said to a student as they positioned a figure formed of tape. “Some should look more dead than others.”

It was almost time for the big reveal of their latest art project: recreating a Holocaust-style gas chamber with dozens of people-like figures constructed out of masking tape.

“There’s definitely the creepy factor,” Madi Hughes said, while hanging a figure from the ceiling in the school’s wrestling room. “But it’s also awesome how much we have learned.”

To create the sculptures, classmates wrapped each other with masking tape, from toes to shoulders, and carefully slipped the tape off. They went through about 100 rolls of tape.

“It’s the best project we’ve ever done,” Hughes, who is 13, said. “We can do some boring things in school, but this project was like boom… like fireworks.”

Over the past few months, students have been studying the World War II and the Holocaust period in history, science and English classes. So, DeLong pitched the idea of creating a life-like gas chamber in art class.

“It’s a pretty out there statement — let’s make a gas chamber,” DeLong said.

End quote

I ask you, dear readers: Can you think of a better way to trivialize the Holocaust? I hope that this teacher is Jewish — otherwise she could be headed to prison for perpetrating this stunt.

My photo of the gas chamber in the Auschwitz main camp

My photo of the gas chamber in the Auschwitz main camp

What’s wrong with this map?

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 8:12 am
Map of Poland

Map shows 3 Nazi death camps on the border of Poland

The map, shown above, identifies the locations of three of the alleged Nazi death camps: Treblinka, Sobibor and Belzec. All 3 of these camps were very near the Bug river, which is not shown on the map.

Allegedly, the Nazis transported Jews to Treblinka, Sobibor and Belzec for no reason, other than to kill them. But why waste trains and manpower to transport Jews to these Godforsaken places when it would have been more efficient, and cheaper, to gas them in Warsaw or at Auschwitz.

Transporting Jews from Warsaw to Treblinka and Belzec, both of which are right on the border of Poland, was highly inefficient, since the Jews could have been killed in a hidden gas chamber in Warsaw, and no one would have known about it.

Note that the locations of Warsaw and Auschwitz were easier to reach, than the three locations along the river. Auschwitz was the largest central railroad hub in Europe; trains from anywhere in Europe could go to Auschwitz without changing tracks.

If you have ever been to Germany, you know that the German people are very smart and very efficient. So why did the Germans come up with this stupid plan of transporting the Jews to Treblinka, Sobibor and Belzec to be killed?  This is a trick question. The answer is that the Jews were not transported to these places to be killed; the Jews were sent, from these locations, into the eastern territories to get rid of them, but not to kill them.

So why am I writing about this now, you ask. It is because I have just read a news article about these camps: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/unearthing-the-atrocities-of-nazi-death-camps/

The following quote is from the news article, cited above:

Begin quote

During the Second World War, [Caroline] Sturdy Colls knew, more than 900,000 Jewish deportees had been killed at the Treblinka death camp, an unassuming site about the size of a suburban shopping mall. After closely guarded boxcars of arrivals passed through the gates of Treblinka or its sister camps, Beec [Belzec] and Sobibór, it took less than an hour for camp staff to exterminate them in engine-exhaust gas chambers.

All three of the Operation Reinhard camps were located within a few hundred miles of each other in formerly central (now eastern) Poland, and some 500 miles from the notorious Auschwitz death camp. Of the approximately 1.7 million Jewish people who arrived at the three Reinhard camps, scarcely a hundred survived the war, and they only made it because they staged desperate breakouts that succeeded against all odds.

End quote

Photo credit: Culture Club/Getty Images

Photo credit: Culture Club/Getty Images

My 1998 photo of the memorial stones at Treblinka

My 1998 photo of the memorial stones at the Treblinka camp

According to my tour guide, who accompanied me to Treblinka in 1998, the stones in the photo above cover the area where the ashes were buried after the Jews were gassed and burned at Treblinka. Each stone represents a town or a city from which the victims were taken to Treblinka to be killed. This monument prevents anyone from digging in this area to see if ashes or bodies are buried here.