Scrapbookpages Blog

July 14, 2016

Where are the graves of the 6 million Jews that were killed in the Holocaust?

Filed under: Uncategorized — furtherglory @ 5:08 pm

Do the 6 million Jews, who were killed in the Holocaust, have graves? Inquiring minds want to know.

Most of the 6 million dead Jews do not have individual graves, but they do have mass graves. I visited the graves at Dachau on one of my many trips to the Dachau memorial site.

Mass grave of Jews who died at Dachau

Mass grave of Jews who died at Dachau

Monument for dead Jews at Waldfriedhof cemetery

Monument for Jews at Waldfriedhof cemetery in Dachau

Waldfriedhof is the new town cemetery of Dachau. It is located north of Old Town Dachau. The Waldfriedhof is huge, compared to the Altfriedhof, the old town cemetery. Preparations for this new burial site began during World War II, and some of the work was done by prisoners in the Dachau concentration camp.

In May 1945, the first month after the Dachau camp was liberated by the American Seventh Army, there were 2,226 deaths in the camp. There were 196 deaths in June, the second month after the Dachau camp was liberated.

The German citizens of the town of Dachau buried 1,268 of the victims of the typhus epidemic at Waldfriedhof. This cemetery is  6.5 kilometers from the concentration camp. Other Jewish prisoners were buried in the Leitenberg cemetery; 800 bodies were burned in the crematorium at the Dachau concentration camp.

Memorial stone for Jews in Dachau cemetery

Memorial stone for Jews in Dachau cemetery

In 1964, on May 1st, the Communist labor day, a memorial stone designed by Dieter Aldinger was dedicated at the site of the prisoners’ graves. It is shown in the photograph above.

The graves of the camp victims at Dachau are arranged in terraced rows on a gently sloping hillside near the entrance to the cemetery. A few miniature roses have been planted along some of the rows, but for the most part, these graves looked untended when I visited the cemetery in May 2001.

The rest of this vast cemetery is very well maintained with not a weed in sight. There were no other visitors in this part of the cemetery while I was there, and no fresh flowers or wreaths had been left at any of the graves.

Jewish prisoner at Dachau is buried side by side with Christian victim

Jewish prisoner at Dachau is buried next to Christian victim

Marker in honor of Polish victims at Dachau

Marker in honor of Polish victims at Dachau

Marker in honor of Jews who died at Dachau

Marker in honor of Jews who died at Dachau

Elie’s first Night in the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 9:17 am
This is what Elie Wiesel saw on his first night at Auschwitz-Birkenau

This is what Elie Wiesel allegedly saw on his first night at Auschwitz

Display board shows the road on which Elie and his father walked

Display board shows the road on which Elie and his father allegedly walked into the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp

Note the photo on the display board; the photo shows a woman and three children, who are allegedly on their way to the gas chamber. This famous photo is from the Auschwitz Album; it was taken by an SS man on May 26, 1944.

This photo was shown as evidence at the Auschwitz Trial in Frankfurt where 22 SS men, who had formerly worked at Auschwitz-Birkenau, were put on trial by the Germans in 1963.

On his alleged first night in the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp, Elie Wiesel allegedly saw German soldiers throwing  live babies into a burning pit. That is why Elie used the title “Night” for one of his numerous books.

Born on September 30, 1928 in the Jewish community of Sighet in Transylvania, which is now in Romania, Elie Wiesel was 15 and a half when he allegedly arrived at Birkenau on a train transport of Hungarian Jews in May 1944.

Elie and his father allegedly stayed in the Birkenau camp for only a few days before being transferred to the main Auschwitz camp where he was kept in quarantine for a couple of weeks.

Elie was saved from the gas chamber because he and his father were allegedy selected to work in the Buna Werke camp at Monowitz, also known as Auschwitz III. His two older sisters also survived, but he never saw his mother and younger sister again after he was separated from them upon his arrival at Auschwitz-Birkenau.

According to the display board shown in the photo above, the road through the Birkenau camp was a shortcut to Krema IV and Krema V where there were gas chambers, disguised as shower rooms.

After arriving around midnight at the Birkenau camp, Elie Wiesel and his father were allegedly assigned to a barrack in the Gypsy camp, which was to the left on the interior camp road, shown in the photo above, behind the Men’s camp.

The interior road runs north and south, connecting the Women’s camp to the new section, called “Mexico” by the prisoners. At that time, part of the Gypsy camp had been converted into a transit camp for the Durchgangsjuden who were held there temporarily until they could be transferred to another location.

Elie Wiesel could not have seen the alleged gas chambers at Birkenau because they are at the western end of the Birkenau camp, beyond the intersection of the main camp road and this interior road which bisects the camp from north to south.

Elie wrote in his book, entitled “Night”, that on his first night in the camp, a night that he would never forget, he saw two burning pits, one for children and one for adults, where Jews were being burned alive.

Elie and his father were miraculously spared at the last moment when, only two steps from the burning ditch, they were ordered to turn left and enter the barracks.

The following quote is from “Night” by Elie Wiesel:

Begin quote

Not far from us, flames were leaping up from a ditch, gigantic flames. They were burning something. A lorry drew up at the pit and delivered its load-little children. Babies! Around us, everyone was weeping. Someone began to recite the Kaddish. I do not know if it has ever happened before, in the long history of the Jews, that people have ever recited the prayer for the dead for themselves …. Never shall I forget that night, the first night in camp …. Never shall I forget that smoke. Never shall I forget the little faces of the children, whose bodies I saw turned into wreaths of smoke beneath a silent sky.

End quote

After a few days in the Birkenau camp, Elie and his father were allegedly transferred to the main Auschwitz camp, where they were allegedly housed in Barrack 17 for a short time.

In his book entitled “Night,” Elie Wiesel wrote that he was tattooed with the number A-7713 at the main Auschwitz camp. After a few weeks in the main camp, Elie and his father were then allegedly sent to Auschwitz III, the Monowitz camp also known as Buna.

Monument in honor of the Jews who worked at Monowitz

Monument in honor of the Jews who worked at the Monowitz camp

The figures in the monument, shown above, are supposed to look like the  curved fence posts in the three Auschwitz camps.