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July 14, 2016

Elie’s first Night in the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 9:17 am
This is what Elie Wiesel saw on his first night at Auschwitz-Birkenau

This is what Elie Wiesel allegedly saw on his first night at Auschwitz

Display board shows the road on which Elie and his father walked

Display board shows the road on which Elie and his father allegedly walked into the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp

Note the photo on the display board; the photo shows a woman and three children, who are allegedly on their way to the gas chamber. This famous photo is from the Auschwitz Album; it was taken by an SS man on May 26, 1944.

This photo was shown as evidence at the Auschwitz Trial in Frankfurt where 22 SS men, who had formerly worked at Auschwitz-Birkenau, were put on trial by the Germans in 1963.

On his alleged first night in the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp, Elie Wiesel allegedly saw German soldiers throwing  live babies into a burning pit. That is why Elie used the title “Night” for one of his numerous books.

Born on September 30, 1928 in the Jewish community of Sighet in Transylvania, which is now in Romania, Elie Wiesel was 15 and a half when he allegedly arrived at Birkenau on a train transport of Hungarian Jews in May 1944.

Elie and his father allegedly stayed in the Birkenau camp for only a few days before being transferred to the main Auschwitz camp where he was kept in quarantine for a couple of weeks.

Elie was saved from the gas chamber because he and his father were allegedy selected to work in the Buna Werke camp at Monowitz, also known as Auschwitz III. His two older sisters also survived, but he never saw his mother and younger sister again after he was separated from them upon his arrival at Auschwitz-Birkenau.

According to the display board shown in the photo above, the road through the Birkenau camp was a shortcut to Krema IV and Krema V where there were gas chambers, disguised as shower rooms.

After arriving around midnight at the Birkenau camp, Elie Wiesel and his father were allegedly assigned to a barrack in the Gypsy camp, which was to the left on the interior camp road, shown in the photo above, behind the Men’s camp.

The interior road runs north and south, connecting the Women’s camp to the new section, called “Mexico” by the prisoners. At that time, part of the Gypsy camp had been converted into a transit camp for the Durchgangsjuden who were held there temporarily until they could be transferred to another location.

Elie Wiesel could not have seen the alleged gas chambers at Birkenau because they are at the western end of the Birkenau camp, beyond the intersection of the main camp road and this interior road which bisects the camp from north to south.

Elie wrote in his book, entitled “Night”, that on his first night in the camp, a night that he would never forget, he saw two burning pits, one for children and one for adults, where Jews were being burned alive.

Elie and his father were miraculously spared at the last moment when, only two steps from the burning ditch, they were ordered to turn left and enter the barracks.

The following quote is from “Night” by Elie Wiesel:

Begin quote

Not far from us, flames were leaping up from a ditch, gigantic flames. They were burning something. A lorry drew up at the pit and delivered its load-little children. Babies! Around us, everyone was weeping. Someone began to recite the Kaddish. I do not know if it has ever happened before, in the long history of the Jews, that people have ever recited the prayer for the dead for themselves …. Never shall I forget that night, the first night in camp …. Never shall I forget that smoke. Never shall I forget the little faces of the children, whose bodies I saw turned into wreaths of smoke beneath a silent sky.

End quote

After a few days in the Birkenau camp, Elie and his father were allegedly transferred to the main Auschwitz camp, where they were allegedly housed in Barrack 17 for a short time.

In his book entitled “Night,” Elie Wiesel wrote that he was tattooed with the number A-7713 at the main Auschwitz camp. After a few weeks in the main camp, Elie and his father were then allegedly sent to Auschwitz III, the Monowitz camp also known as Buna.

Monument in honor of the Jews who worked at Monowitz

Monument in honor of the Jews who worked at the Monowitz camp

The figures in the monument, shown above, are supposed to look like the  curved fence posts in the three Auschwitz camps.

 

1 Comment »

  1. Holy shit ! A dump truck full of dead babies. Not only dead,but being thrown into a BBQ pit. Damn ! Ellie has one kick ass imagination. That shits better than “Hellraiser” and “The Exorcist” all rolled into one! So where was the alter that they offered their sacrifice to Lucifer located at in the prison? Ellie missed his “true calling”. Hollywood was screaming for him. Freddy Kreugar ain’t got shit on the nazis. I bet Ellie was a gas to be around on Halloween . I’m sorry folks,but Hollywood got cheated out of the master horror writer of all time. Eat your heart out Roger Corman. In all seriousness,a person will be compelled to ask,”just how dark of a soul,did Ellie have”? It’s gonna take a dark twisted f–k to think of a lie that depraved. Shows they have no regard for human life themselves. This is the kind of asshole that comes up with,”dead baby jokes”.

    Comment by Tim — July 14, 2016 @ 1:11 pm


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