Scrapbookpages Blog

July 17, 2016

Throw Mama from the train a kiss

Filed under: Germany, movies, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 7:30 pm

The following quote, from this news article, made me think of a famous line, allegedly spoken by immigrants to America, and I used it for the title of my blog post.

Begin quote from news article:

A Holocaust survivor has relived the childhood horror of watching a Nazi death squad gun down her mother, during a talk at a Baldock school.

End quote

Note that Hannah’s mother was gunned down “during a talk at a Baldock school.”

The photo of Hannah Lewis, shown below, was included in the news article. LitttleHannah

The following quote is from the news article:

Hannah was born in 1937 in Włodawa, a market town in eastern Poland where Jews made up about half the population before the war and the Nazi occupation.

In 1943 she and her family were rounded up and sent to a forced labour camp in Adampol.

Her father and cousin were able to escape, join the resistance and warn Haya that a Nazi Einsatzgruppe (death squad) was on the way – but Haya stayed because she was unable to move Hannah, who had typhus.

On liberation Hannah was found starved and hiding in a ditch by a Red Army soldier, and was reunited with her father. She moved to Britain in 1949 and now has four children and eight grandchildren.

End quote

The Death’s Head symbol was worn by the Einsatzgruppen, the soldiers who followed behind the regular troops, killing the Communists and Jews, when the German Army invaded Russia on June 22, 1941. The Death’s Head symbol was also worn by the guards in the Nazi concentration camps.

SeppDietrich02

General Sepp Dietrich is shown wearing a death’s head emblem on his cap

 

tear down this eyesore

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 11:26 am

Remember when Ronald Reagan said “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall

It is time for someone, maybe Donald Trump, to say, with regard to the Berlin monument, shown in the photo below: “tear down this eyesore.”

Monument to the Jews in Berlin

Monument to the Jews in the heart of Berlin

Completed memorial covers 5 and a half acres

Berlin Memorial covers 5 and a half acres Photo Credit: Bonnie M. Harris

My 2002 photo of the location of the monument

My 2002 photo of the location of the monument just before it was built

The following article was sent to me in 2002 by Bonnie M. Harris; she gave me permission to publish the article, which is quoted below:

HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL BERLIN
A personal perspective by Bonnie M. Harris

As a PhD candidate in Public History at the University of California, Santa Barbara, I recently completed a month-long tour of Holocaust sites in Poland, The Czech Republic, Austria, and Germany while performing archival research into the Polenaktion of October 28, 1938. During my research trip to Berlin, I took the occasion to visit the new Holocaust Memorial in the center of the city.

I had read several reviews about the memorial just after it had been constructed in 2005, so I was prepared to see a massive field of stone pillars meant to convey and incite emotions in the viewers about the Holocaust through an abstract artistic approach. As I came upon the memorial from the corner of Ebertstrasse and Hannah-Arendtstrasse, my initial reaction as I looked across the entire area was one of disappointment.

The field of stele first appeared small and insignificant and I did not see how this city block of rectangular concrete slabs could possibly impress me. But as I entered the memorial my perception began to change. At first, the stele were barely inches in height, but as I continued to walk the concrete paths between the slabs, suddenly the ground plunged down and the steles were soon well over my head ­ a fact I could not know or see from where I first stood when I looked over the site. As I continued to walk paths without any forethought as to where I would end up, the ground rose and fell in a random undulation, and the stele towered above me and cut off my vision of the horizon and the sounds of life in the city.

One path looked very much like another and a sense of direction was impossible to maintain. Even as I saw other people pass in and out of my vision as they trespassed the paths of the memorial just as I did, I had this unnatural feeling of being alone and disconnected from all others. I emerged from the forest of concrete on the opposite side of where I had entered and as I looked back on the field of stele, I saw a completely different visual portrayal of the site. I now saw shadows that demarcated height and depth to the field, with variations in angles and slopes. And I could barely see those who still wandered among the stone giants, only catching glimpses as they walked in and out of my field of sight. I realized that what I had just experienced taught me an important lesson about the Holocaust.

Those of us, who only approach the experience of the Holocaust from the peripheral historical facts, will never be able to fully understand the perceptions and sufferings of those who actually lived through it ­ who actually walked its paths. And even those of us who do all that we can to try to learn about the Holocaust through the testimonies of those who survived, we will never be able to walk the same path and feel exactly what they felt, because each experience is as individual as each stone slab in the field of 2711.

Even though they may appear the same from the outside, as the Nazis tried to strip all individuality from their victims, the stones are of varying heights, with varying degrees of slant, shading, color, and reflection. Individualities still existed among the Holocaust victims and to a great degree it was the randomness of individuality that allowed some to survive and a great many to die.

I also learned that once you have immersed yourself in Holocaust education by trying to internalize the testimonies of the witnesses and by becoming a witness yourself by seeing the camps, the gas chambers, the ovens, the burial sites and other places of death and torture that can now only be memorialized, your perception forever changes and you now have a clearer understanding of what the Holocaust really was and how it impacted personal lives and family dynamics, as well as an entire culture’s identity and international societal ethics.

End quote

 

Why are Jews flocking back to Germany?

Filed under: Germany — furtherglory @ 8:14 am

You can read about why Jews now want to be German citizens here:

http://www.jpost.com/Diaspora/Report-Descendants-of-Jews-who-fled-Nazis-seeking-German-citizenship-after-Brexit-459530

The short answer to the question in the title of my blog post is this:

Jewish children sent to England now want to go back to Germany because Britain wants out of the European Union

You can read here about why American Jews want to become German citizens:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/acts-of-faith/wp/2016/07/14/american-jews-consider-the-unthinkable-should-they-become-german-citizens/

The following quote is from the news article, cited above:

Begin quote

Joost Oppenheim came into the world stateless.

He had no choice: Born in the Netherlands to refu­gees from Nazi Germany, both the country of his birth and the country of his ancestry refused him citizenship.

Eighty-one years later, Oppenheim and his family have a choice, but the decision is so wrenching that it has left relatives across three generations arguing about the ethics of identity.

End quote

Holocaust denier kicked to the curb in Canada

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 7:43 am

You can read about Holocaust Denier Monika Schaefer at http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/canadian-greens-expel-holocaust-denier-monika-schaefer-video/2016/07/17/

Photo from Monika Schaefer's website

Photo from Monika’s website

If you have no interest in the Holocaust, nor in Holocaust denial, at least listen to Monika play the fiddle in the video below.  I hope that I am correct in calling her instrument a fiddle, not a violin.

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

The Canadian Green Party on Friday issued a press release condemning “statements made by former candidate” Monika Schaefer. Green Party leader MP Elizabeth May said in the same press release: “I am shocked by comments made by Ms. Schaefer and I condemn her terribly misguided and untrue statements. Ms. Schaefer does not represent the values of the Green Party nor of our membership.”

It began on Thursday, when B’nai Brith Canada exposed Schaefer—the Green Party’s candidate in Alberta in 2006, 2008 and 2011—as denying the Holocaust in a homemade YouTube video. Schaefer described the Holocaust as “the most persistent lie in all of history,” and claimed that victims of Nazi death camps “were kept as healthy and as well-fed as was possible,” and that “there were no gas chambers there.” She denounced “the 6-million lie” and recommended the writings of Ernst Zündel, a German Holocaust denier who had been deported from Canada in 2005.

End quote

If this is happening in Canada, can America be far behind? The Jews will do anything to preserve their cash cow — the Holocaust

This quote from the news article explains it:

Emily McMillan, Executive Director of the Green Party of Canada, said “Monika Schaefer’s comments denying the Holocaust are outrageous and shocking. Ms. Schaefer has no standing within the Green Party of Canada, and her views are exclusively her own. Ms. Schaefer was rejected as a potential Green candidate for the riding of Yellowhead prior to the 2015 federal election, and also rejected as a potential candidate for the 2014 by-election in Fort McMurray-Athabasca.”

“In light of Ms. Schaefer’s untrue statements made in a recent online video, we will be initiating the process to terminate her membership with the Green Party of Canada at the earliest possible opportunity,” McMillan added.

A Green Party member may be expelled by a resolution of Federal Council or a General Meeting of members. The Party will request a motion be put forward to terminate Schaefer’s membership at its next Federal Council meeting, according to the press release.