Scrapbookpages Blog

July 26, 2016

Oops, wrong use of photo in Holocaust article

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 8:15 am
Kenny Wodzanowski, group leader for World Youth Day pilgrims from the Diocese of Brooklyn, N.Y., walks with his rosary alongside prisoners' barracks during a July 25 visit to the Birkenau Nazi concentration camp in Oswiecim, Poland. (CNS photo/Bob Roller) See WYD-AUSCHWITZ-PILGRIMS July 25, 2016.

Kenny Wodzanowski, group leader for World Youth Day pilgrims from the Diocese of Brooklyn, N.Y., walks with his rosary alongside prisoners’ barracks during a July 25 visit to the Birkenau Nazi concentration camp in Oswiecim, Poland. (CNS photo/Bob Roller) See WYD-AUSCHWITZ-PILGRIMS July 25, 2016.

The barracks shown in the photo above are not “prisoners’ barracks.” These barracks, located just inside the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp, were the quarantine barracks, where prisoners were held for a few weeks until it was determined that they did not have any disease which would spread to the entire camp. The purpose of these barracks was to save lives.

The quarantine barracks

Quarantine barracks at Birkenau

The photo above shows the wooden barrack buildings in BIIa, the Quarantine section, at Auschwitz-Birkenau. These are prefabricated horse barns, which were typically used in concentration camps, and also used for army barracks, because they were easy to put up and to take down.

In the background, you can see the vast forest of brick chimneys, which is all that is left of the barracks buildings on the north side of the Birkenau camp. The Quarantine section faces a busy public road that runs north and south past the Birkenau camp.

Quarentine barracl. as seem from top of gate tower

Quarantine barracks, as seem from the top of Birkenau gate tower

Tourists, who take a guided tour of Birkenau, are typically taken first to these barracks, which are just inside the camp as you enter. Of course, they are not told that the purpose of these barracks was to save lives.

The information, given on all the display boards, makes it clear that the Nazis did nothing humane: the prisoners were allegedly housed in the Quarantine camp in order to establish discipline, not to stop the spread of disease, according to the display board. The hair was allegedly cut from the heads of the incoming prisoners to humiliate them, not to control the lice which spreads typhus.

When I visited Birkenau in 2005 and again in 2007, practically every sign in the camp made a point of mentioning the gas chambers and emphasizing the fact that the Jews were sent immediately to the gas chamber, rather than being registered in the camp. There are no death records for the Jew who were not registered, so there is no way of knowing how many Jews were murdered.

During World War I, four million people had died from typhus in Poland, and fifty million world-wide had died from the Spanish flu. At Birkenau, there was a grave danger of an epidemic spreading to the SS guards in the camp, or even to the German soldiers fighting on the Eastern front. This was the reason for isolating new prisoners in the Quarantine barracks for a period of time.

On December 28, 1942 a directive was issued to all the Nazi concentration camps which included this statement: “The Reichsf├╝hrer SS [Heinrich Himmler] has ordered that the death rate absolutely must be reduced.”

This order referred to the death rate from typhus and other diseases. Yet, according to today’s Holohoaxers, the prisoners who were saved from disease were then allegedly gassed — in underground chambers that looked like crematories for dead bodies.

My photo of the quarantine barracks at Birkenau

My photo of the quarantine barracks at the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp