Scrapbookpages Blog

August 31, 2016

“each of the 6 million victims was an ordinary person like Hanna”

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 8:57 am
Hanna's suitcase

Hanna’s suitcase

The story of a little Jewish girl named Hanna, and her famous suitcase, is back in the news. A photo of her suitcase is shown above. WaisenKind means orphan.

http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201608300006.html

Although Hanna was an “orphan,” she allegedly had a brother.The brother of little Hanna survived the Holocaust, perhaps because he was not burdened by a suitcase that he had to carry when he was sent to the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp, or maybe because he was old enough to work.

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

When Fumiko Ishioka holds lectures for schoolchildren [in Japan] about the inhumanity of the Holocaust, she gets through to the kids by showing them an unassuming little brown suitcase.

“Hana’s Suitcase” belonged to Hana [Hanna] Brady, a 13-year-old Jewish girl from Czechoslovakia who perished in the Nazi-run gas chambers at the Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland in the closing months of World War II.

[Why was little Hanna allowed to live in a death camp until the “closing months of World War II?” Children under the age of 15 were allegedly killed immediately.]

Hanna’s story has been published in 40 countries, while drama and film adaptations of her tragic life have also been created.

Ishioka has spoken about the Holocaust to more than 200,000 children in Japan and 10 foreign countries over the past 13 years.

In July, the 45-year-old hosted her 1,000th “Hana’s Suitcase” class at a senior high school in Tokyo.

End quote

Excuse me! I think that this young Japanese girl should be telling stories about how the “Japs” tortured and killed prisoners of war, not about the Jews. I was a young child during World War II and all we ever heard about was the atrocities committed by the Japanese. We knew nothing about young Jewish girls who carried suitcases into a prison camp during wartime.

American soldiers, who were ethnic German, were sent to the Pacific rim during World War II, not to Germany. I had an uncle, who was sent to the Pacific; he returned home with stories of the atrocities committed by the Japs.

The following quote is also from the news article:

Begin quote

Ishioka later learned that Hana’s older brother survived a concentration camp and was living in Canada. The two met and Hana’s brother told Ishioka the story of his little sister.

Ishioka says that children strongly feel the tragedy of the Holocaust when they see the suitcase during her lectures.

She repeatedly urges the kids to “imagine,” so they can understand that each of the 6 million victims was an ordinary person like Hana [Hanna].

End quote

You can see a large photo of the famous suitcase at the top of the news article. For some reason, I was unable to copy the photo.