Scrapbookpages Blog

December 5, 2016

the little Jewish boy who wasn’t just whistling “Dixie” when he jumped off a train bound for Auschwitz

Filed under: Holocaust, Uncategorized — furtherglory @ 9:37 am

I won’t keep you in suspense: the little Jewish boy, who survived the Holocaust, and is now out on the lecture circuit, raking in money, as he tells his Holocaust story, was actually whistling Glenn Miller’s famous song entitled “In the Mood” to distract the German guards. [He wasn’t just “whistling Dixie”, a phrase that means that a person is lying.]

The following quote is from the news article, which you can read in full at http://www.santafenewmexican.com/pasatiempo/performance/the-th-train-simon-gronowski-recounts-his-narrow-escape-from/article_f30e421a-111c-522f-ae66-01f45e322053.html

Begin quote

Simon Gronowski  [a Holocaust survivor] said he often thinks about the moment in April 1943 when he was eleven years old and jumped from a train carrying more than 1,600 Jews to the concentration camp at Auschwitz. Gronowski and his mother, Chana, who had been arrested by the Gestapo at their hiding place in Brussels, were being sent from a transit camp at Mechelen in Flanders to almost certain death in the gas chambers [at Auschwitz]. 

Many prisoners were still dozing that night when the death train was ambushed by three resistance fighters, allowing 233 [Jews] to escape, including Gronowski. He was among the 118 passengers on the infamous 20th train who got away safely. Others were shot by the Germans.

End quote

You might think that it is easy to jump off a moving freight train, but it is actually very dangerous. When I was a child, I lived in a house that was only a few feet from the tracks of a major railroad line.

The homeless bums, who were “riding the rails” would jump off the freight trains that went though the small town where I lived. Then they would head straight for the house where I lived and knock on the back door. They would offer to chop wood for our wood-burning kitchen stove, in exchange for a jelly sandwich. The bums didn’t expect any peanut butter on their sandwich. This was during the Depression when people didn’t expect much.

The following quote is also from the news article:

Begin quote

The day that still haunts Simon Gronowski  is April 19, 1943. Train 801 left the Dossin barracks  at 10 p.m. with 1,631 Jews — ranging in age from  six weeks old to ninety — bound for Auschwitz. Gronowksi awoke in his mother’s arms and saw men prying open the carriage. When the train slowed, his mother lowered him to the running board. Gronowski, who had practiced jumping, leaped off the moving train, landing on the gravel without falling.

End quote

His mother lowered him to “the running board”? What kind of a train has a “running board”?

To me, the term “running board” means a step that is outside the door of a car or a truck. In the old days, people used to thumb a ride, alongside a road. They would hop onto the “running board” which was a step just below the car door.

The photo below shows a little girl standing on the running board of a car. She is probably wearing her First Communion white dress.

running board.jpg

28 Comments »

  1. Mr. Gronowski started to peddle yet more fantastic versions of this story in 2013, after a mere 70 years of silence, here and here, or here (fw).

    Although his sister is mentioned in a generic deportation list, Mr. Gronowski did not deem it worthy of filling out a form mentioning his mother and sister for the Yad Vashem database.

    Comment by Webworm — December 7, 2016 @ 1:41 am

  2. Just about as nonsensical as HoloHoax survivor Stephen Ross who said he had his back broken and walked for some time to safety…..YA right….Good point about the trains and how many people that you could put in them.
    I also think that the numbers they say were crammed into them is a joke.
    To really get down to the truth you have to take one train car figure for the weight of 150 people then see how many cars were attached to the engine and see if that engine was designed to carry that much weight.
    A good homework assignment for someone…..
    Here is what you would get….150 people times say 100 lbs average weight per person equals 15, 000 lbs people weight per car times say 50 cars equals 750,000 lbs of train capacity plus personel stuff carried on by soldiers and people on the train….
    I would think your talking a million lbs of weight being pulled by this train engine….was the engine capable of carrying that much weight? That is the question that needs to be answered before we get into how many they say were crammed onto this train
    FG…..You did write about HoloHuxster Steven Ross I see…
    http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/DachauLiberation/StephanRoss.html

    JR

    Comment by jrizoli — December 5, 2016 @ 11:15 am

  3. You ask what type of train has a running board? Well a normal train has one or at least did in those days. We are all conditioned to believe the stories that all jews were sent east in terrible conditions on ‘cattle wagons’. When in fact many transports used standard passenger trains with individual seats and windows, God forbid!!

    There is a current topic on the codoh Forum about the capacity of such trains to establish how many people could have been sent on noted transports. The reality is that the average carriage or box car was able to take about 40-60 people so the claims one see from time to time of 150-18- people crammed into these cars is total nonsense.

    Comment by mr b — December 5, 2016 @ 9:59 am

    • You wrote: “a normal train has one or at least did in those days. We are all conditioned to believe the stories that all jews were sent east in terrible conditions on ‘cattle wagons’.”

      Your definition of the term “running board” seems to be different than mine. Do a google search on photos of a “running board” and see if you find any photos of a “running board” on a train.

      In my day, it was traditional for little girls and boys to pose on the “running board” of their father’s car.

      I rode on trains very frequently when I was a child in the 1940ies. I stepped off a passenger train many times, but never onto a “running board.” The trains had steps that were lowered to let the passengers climb down from passenger cars.

      Comment by furtherglory — December 5, 2016 @ 10:14 am

      • I am replying to my own comment, to inform the readers of my blog, that I have added a photo of a little girl standing on the “running board” of an old car.

        Comment by furtherglory — December 5, 2016 @ 11:11 am

      • 2 weeks ago, Belgian TV did broadcast an interview with Simon Gronowski (Belgian TV show “Les Orages de la Vie”) and pics of deportation wagons with a running board could be seen in that TV show (see below).

        (http://www.rtl.be/tv/rtltvi/replay/22-11-2016-simon-gronowski at 6:35 and 7:15)

        Comment by hermie — December 5, 2016 @ 7:18 pm

    • Your delusion is real, i think your silver spoon life and sucking on mummy’s privies till adulthood is clouding your brain on what people would do to survive even at young ages. Maybe you need to travel this world to people who face real hardships, not hiking and adventure types where you pay money to get equipment etc, i mean hardships with literally no money, food etc To see how you have it lovely from your horrible parenting. Your parents are a shame to have ever existed.

      Comment by lb199 — December 5, 2016 @ 11:03 am

    • Japan’s commuter trains carry an average of over 6 people per square meter at rush hour:

      http://www.elsi.jp/en/blog/2015/11/blog1126.html

      The passenger floor area of the train borjastick mentions is 8m * 2.7m = 21.6 m^2. At 6 persons/m^2, it would have 130 people per car. If one considers young people, over 6 people per sq meter is quite plausible. One could go as high as 10 per sq meter or more. Here is someone’s computer graphic of large people in a crowd:

      http://www.gkstill.com/Support/crowd-density/CrowdDensity-1.html
      http://www.gkstill.com/Support/crowd-density/CrowdDensity-2.html

      Phone booth stuffing reaches densities close to water density (approximately 20 persons per sq meter). Admittedly, this doesn’t really apply here. But people’s intuition about these densities is off. You should see yourself how easily and comfortably a density of 6-8 people per sq meter is – particularly figuring children into the deal. It is not “total nonsense” as you say.

      Comment by blake121666 — December 5, 2016 @ 2:30 pm

      • You wrote: “Japan’s commuter trains carry an average of over 6 people per square meter at rush hour”

        What does this have to do with the price of tea in China?

        Comment by furtherglory — December 5, 2016 @ 2:36 pm

        • He brought up the codoh forum topic of train density which claims that 6 persons per square meter is impossible. It’s not only impossible, but is achieved every single day in Japan. Read his comment:

          “There is a current topic on the codoh Forum about the capacity of such trains to establish how many people could have been sent on noted transports. The reality is that the average carriage or box car was able to take about 40-60 people so the claims one see from time to time of 150-18- people crammed into these cars is total nonsense.”

          130 is very easily doable as I’ve shown. 150-180 is conceivably possible and not “total nonsense” – particularly when we don’t have the exact dimensions of the exact trains in question and allow for children in the calculation.

          Comment by blake121666 — December 5, 2016 @ 2:45 pm

          • You might have mentioned that putting people on these trains comfortablly would be the issue here sure you can cram them in in shoulder to shoulder so they can’t move but that wouldn’t be a comfortable train ride would it.

            JR

            Comment by jrizoli — December 5, 2016 @ 2:48 pm

            • Japanese commuter trains aren’t THAT uncomfortable nowadays. They were in the 50s though – but they crammed them even much much more back them. Probably 8-10 persons per square meter.

              Comment by blake121666 — December 5, 2016 @ 2:52 pm

          • You wrote: “He brought up the codoh forum topic of train density”

            I don’t read the CODOH forum. I just checked it out, and I don’t think that I will ever follow this forum.

            Comment by furtherglory — December 5, 2016 @ 2:54 pm

            • It’s ridiculously biased. If I were to post about Japanese train daily rush hour train densities on that thread, it would be deleted.

              Such a forum would allow Fred Leuchter’s faulty Zyklon explosiveness argument to propagate w/o anyone pointing out that Zyklon fumigations were done 100s of thousands of times by the Germans in the war years w/o any explosion. Only after one of the leaders of Revisionism, Germar Rudolf, set people straight about this could anyone talk at least a tiny bit of sense about this. And it isn’t clear to me what the boundary currently is even now on that topic. They want forum readers to ignorantly accept faulty Revisionist arguments.

              Comment by blake121666 — December 5, 2016 @ 3:06 pm

              • You wrote: ” Only after one of the leaders of Revisionism, Germar Rudolf, set people straight about this could anyone talk at least a tiny bit of sense about this.”

                IMHO, the term “forum” implies that both sides of opinion, on any subject, are allowed. A “forum” is not a place where only one side of a subject is discussed.

                Comment by furtherglory — December 5, 2016 @ 3:17 pm

              • Zyklon fumigations were done 100s of thousands of times…w/o any explosion — how do you know there were no explosions? — faulty Zyklon explosiveness argument — of course it is HCN that can be explosive (under the right conditions), not “Zyklon” — in that sense, the title of the video above (thanks for posting it) is dumb — They want forum readers to ignorantly accept faulty Revisionist arguments — I doubt that’s what ‘they’ want — in any case, Leuchter clearly overstated/incorrectly emphasized the risk of an HCN explosion in his ‘Report’ (not to mention his typos re this — see the video), especially re the crematoria/’gas chambers’ at A-B — Rudolf has rightly corrected this — but I think this should not lessen the value of Leuchter’s overall conclusion, which is that these facilities were not at all ‘suitable for purpose’, and could not have been used as claimed — btw, that is also the secondary message in the video above — Rudolf makes that pretty clear (he also seems relatively agnostic re the ‘gas chamber’ at the Stammlager, where the crematoria was much closer).

                Comment by eah — December 6, 2016 @ 3:40 am

                • No, that is not the “secondary message in the video”. ANY enclosed space would be perfectly fine to fumigate with Zyklon – including the places claimed. Rudolf’s claim is that the Holocaust claim for HOW the fumigations occurred – with the alleged result in the alleged timeframes – was probably not possible – or at least would have required a ridiculously exorbitant amount of Zyklon.

                  Many thousands of ordinary rooms such as those LKs were fumigated during the war. If any persons were in the room during a fumigation they would certainly have died. The question of how quickly the HCN would evaporate off its substrate, how quickly that evaporated HCN would disperse throughout the room, and how much HCN needed to be present to be inhaled to ensure quick death for anyone anywhere in the room are the important concerns for the plausibility of the Holocaustian allegations. Leuchter’s main argument for your “not suitable for purpose” claim was the bogus explosiveness argument.

                  The alleged Krema I “gas chamber” next to cremation ovens is no concern if one never reaches the LEL (Lower Explosion Limit) of HCN – approximately 6%. To reach 6% HCN in air of any appreciable amount of HCN with Zyklon would require a ridiculous initial dosage of Zyklon way above what anyone would deem plausible – as Rudolf said in the video – 100s of times anything anyone is claiming was what Rudolf was referring to with his concerns. There could have been a raging inferno in the room and no danger of any appreciable explosion with the dosages alleged by Holocaustians.

                  Your semantic argument over “HCN” vs “Zyklon”, calling the title “stupid”, is childish. If the subject were the question of whether one’s car could explode, would you say that’s stupid – the gasoline would be the thing exploding? Silly to an extreme. At least you are aware that there are conditions under which HCN will explode – between 5.6% and 40% concentration in air. In the scenario of interest, the HCN would not evaporate off fast enough to give any appreciable concern of any risk of any appreciable explosion. If you can find any example ever in history of an explosion from Zyklon, I’d like to know of it.

                  Comment by blake121666 — December 6, 2016 @ 4:34 am

                • No, that is not the “secondary message in the video” — hopefully you’ll be OK with it if I decide to hold to my opinion about what the secondary message is — calling the title “stupid”, is childish — not really — you argue here about nonsense details like how many Jews could be stuffed onto a square meter, yet you want to say a discussion over whether “Zyklon” is explosive or not is perfectly OK — “Zyklon” was part of a copyrighted trademark name — it is idiotic to discuss whether a trademark is explosive or not — make a note of it — and to state the obvious: it is not up to me to find an example of an explosion that happened during a war-time Zyklon B fumigation — it is up to you to prove that no such thing ever happened, because that’s exactly what you said — for the record, I do not know of an instance — but unlike you, I would never say that it didn’t happen (however unlikely such an occurrence) — again here you complain about how Leuchter’s (wrong) statements about the explosiveness of HCN are handled on CODOH, yet you make a ridiculous, absolutely impossible-to-prove claim re whether there was ever a wartime fumigation explosion, and are not adult enough to admit that — “go figure”.

                  Comment by eah — December 6, 2016 @ 6:11 am

                • Leuchter’s analysis is analogous to an argument that someone didn’t go ice fishing because he would have risked drowning!

                  It’s absurd to reason that “under the right conditions” a person could drown by going ice fishing. Drowning concerns are not such a concern as to preclude one from going ice fishing. And ice fishing is a typical, natural, and safe activity of Eskimos.

                  The German usage guidelines of NI-9912 specifically and emphatically state that Zyklon fumigations are NOT EXPLOSIVE:

                  http://robertfaurisson.blogspot.com/2015/07/a-document-among-others-stating.html

                  Arguing that this means the opposite of what it says shows a lack of competence and seriousness about the question.

                  The Holocaustian allegations are that Zyklon dosages of the same order of magnitude as fumigations were used in the alleged gas chambers – not the order of magnitude or 2 (10 to 100 times) higher that would be needed to risk an explosion danger.

                  Leuchter’s explosiveness claims are bogus and that is what he based his verdict of unsuitability of the alleged “gas chambers” on. He might have conflated the “pot method” case of HCN fumigation with the Zyklon-B method. The “pot method”, which is used in American execution gas chambers, has inherent explosive dangers not shared by the Zyklon fumigation method. Hence the question “Is Zyklon explosive”. The short answer for the case of the Holocaustian allegations of Zyklon homicidal gas chambers, as alleged, is: no.

                  Anyone tossing around the bogus Revisionist explosiveness argument is only appealing to ignorance. And should be told so whenever this is done in a Holocaust forum – not encouraged to delude himself and others.

                  Comment by blake121666 — December 6, 2016 @ 3:30 pm

                • The explosiveness or not explosiveness of zyklon-b is not an issue with me the issue with me is zyklon-b under the conditions in those camps could not have been used as a killing mechanism for those people Zyclone B does not work that way and has to be in near perfect conditions to be able to kill anyone or anything. Those camps were not set up to do it. That’s not saying they couldn’t have been set up they could have if they have the right equipment, heaters blowers, and all those things associated with the fumigation process being used in the extermination process. Those things were not in place so the Zyclone B could not have been used to execute people simple as that.
                  Just Saying….

                  JR

                  Comment by jrizoli — December 6, 2016 @ 3:49 pm

      • I agree with you on this one, blake. Such a crowd density is plausible, not “total nonsense.”

        Comment by hermie — December 5, 2016 @ 7:39 pm

        • But you fo agree that it would be a tight squeeze.

          JR

          Comment by jrizoli — December 5, 2016 @ 7:48 pm

          • Of course, I do agree on that too, Mr Rizoli.

            Comment by hermie — December 6, 2016 @ 3:09 am

      • It’s clear Jews — and others — were forcibly deported to camps, where they suffered and died under horrible conditions — also the transport was often cruel — responsible revisionists do not waste time on disputing this, or arguing about the particulars.

        Comment by eah — December 6, 2016 @ 3:44 am

        • You wrote: “transport [of the Jews, to camps] was often cruel”

          During World War II, ordinary people in America were riding in box cars — because the passenger cars were full of American soldiers riding to Army camps in America. I lived in a house that was beside the railroad tracks, and I waved to the soldiers in the box cars.

          Sometimes, there were Jews riding to the camps in passenger trains. Some of the survivors mentioned this in the books that they wrote.

          Comment by furtherglory — December 6, 2016 @ 5:36 am

          • ordinary people in America were riding in box cars— OK — but to quote you: What does this have to do with the price of tea in China?

            Comment by eah — December 6, 2016 @ 6:19 am


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