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December 21, 2016

“Hitler: The Monster” on AHC

Filed under: Germany, TV shows, Uncategorized, World War II — furtherglory @ 11:05 am

Last night, I watched the most recent episode of the new six-part Hitler series. This episode was entitled “Hitler:The Monster”.  Including this episode, which ends with the Allied D-Day invasion of Normandy, on June 6th 1944, I have now seen five of the six episodes in the series.

One interesting aspect of this series is that it addresses the issue of the fact that there is little or no evidence, in the written German records of the time period, that Hitler ordered the Holocaust.  This idea was first brought to light by the research of David Irving, when he offered a cash bonus to anybody who could find a written order from Hitler regarding the Holocaust. Irving’s offer was considered a serious act of Holocaust Denial.

The show never mentions David Irving, nor introduces the topic of Holocaust denial.  Yet, on the latest episode of the show, a whole group of Holocaust historians basically admitted that Irving was right.  Maybe all these Historians should be put in jail; if they get a lawyer and try to defend themselves, their lawyer should be put in jail as well.  They have, in part, vindicated the notorious Holocaust denier David Irving!

The show does point out that Hitler MAY have had dinner with Himmler. On the show, there is speculation that Hitler and Himmler MAY have discussed the Holocaust; however the reenactment does not include any dialog, so we don’t know what they MAY have discussed.

This latest episode does show a lot of footage about Hitler’s time spent in the Wolf’s Lair when he was commanding the battles on the Eastern front.  The show emphasizes the time that Hitler spent training his dog at the Wolf’s Lair.  Also discussed, in great detail, is how Hitler had a tendency to micromanage military efforts on the Russian front.

Ominously, at one point, there is a map shown, which shows a red arrow pointing to Stalingrad.  Those of us who already know the story, knew what was going to happen, but this part of the show was really aimed at young people, who might never have learned about Stalingrad until now.

While the show made no mention of the German defeat in North Africa at around the same time, it did a pretty good job of explaining that Stalingrad is viewed, in my opinion correctly, as a major turning point of World War II.

The show has a lot of history to cover, in just six hours, so it couldn’t cover everything, but I was a little sad to see that the issue that it was believed that Stalingrad could have been resupplied by air was not discussed.

A topic, that was also not discussed very well, was the issue of why Hitler was micromanaging his dog, and his troops on the eastern front, but he seemed to delegate most of the daily Holocaust operation, to Himmler.  To me, the show seemed to imply that Hitler wanted to confuse later historians and give credence to future Holocaust deniers, by micromanaging some aspects of the war and not micromanaging others, including not micromanaging the Holocaust enough to even leave a paper trail.  No clear interpretation for this differing degree of micromanagement phenomenon was offered, and it was not explained that alternative theories could well result in jail time for their proponents.

 

 

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