Scrapbookpages Blog

January 26, 2017

The story of Anne Frank is back in the news….

Filed under: Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 7:30 am

Who doesn’t love Anne Frank? — the Jewish girl who hid from the Nazis for years, living in an attic in Amsterdam.

Anne Frank

Anne Frank at the age of 13

I have visited the Anne Frank house in Amsterdam, and I have written extensively about Anne on these two pages of my website:

https://www.scrapbookpages.com/AnneFrank/AnneFrank02.html

https://www.scrapbookpages.com/AnneFrank/AnneFrank01.html

Front door of the Anne Frank house

My photo of the front door of the Anne Frank house in Amsterdam

You can read the latest news about Anne Frank at http://bangordailynews.com/2017/01/25/religion/holocaust-remembrance-day-to-feature-talk-on-americanization-of-anne-frank/

The following quote is from the news story:

Begin quote

BANGOR, Maine — Nearly every American first learns of the Holocaust by reading the “Diary of Anne Frank,” first published in 1952. While an unedited version of the diary was published in the 1990s, the sanitized version of her diary influenced how the Holocaust has been viewed by Americans for decades.

Anthony Wexler, a faculty fellow in religious studies at Colby College, will discuss how the diary contributed what scholars have call the Americanization of the Holocaust at 7 p.m. Friday at Congregation Beth El, 183 French Street, Bangor. It is sponsored by local synagogues and Jewish Community Endowment Associates and is being present on Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day.

“Because of the way the diary was edited by her father, Otto Frank, Anne was made into a kind of All-American girl,” Wexler said in a telephone interview Wednesday. “The Holocaust was a very acceptable event [in the first version of the diary published]. It didn’t feature the aspects of the Holocaust that were most terrifying.”

Other Holocaust scholars have criticized how the historical event has been portrayed in the U.S., including how the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. is designed.

End quote

You can read a description of the Anne Frank house on my website at https://www.scrapbookpages.com/AnneFrank/AnneFrank03.html

In order to see the attic, where Anne was hiding, you must climb some very steep stairs. Don’t worry about falling down these stairs — there are plenty of people on the stairs behind you, ready to catch you if you fall.

The people who work there won’t tell you this, but there is an elevator that you can use — but only if you are a prominent Jew, or if you are in a wheelchair — and a Jew.

 

 

3 Comments »

  1. Your description of the Anne Frank house was very precise. Forgive me but I had to laugh about the steep stairs that you encountered. Yes they can be quite steep as they may lead from ground to fourth floor directly. As a student working in the tourist trade, I once consorted a small group of American students up to their lodgings in a small hotel and they were afraid to go back downstairs so I had to walk first. Well, one gets used to it.
    Of course I never visited the Anne Frank house: all these houses are the same and if you live near the Eiffel Tower it is not the first thing you are going to visit.
    We never cared much about that place anyhow. It was supposed to be torn down. But money was collected and neighbouring houses were bought.
    You must realise that most of what you have seen and will see now is an attempt to reconstruction the situation as in 1944.
    The Anne Frank Foundation is owner of all. This Foundation tried recently to keep the rights on The Diary by claiming that only part of the diary was written by Anne (which we all knew) and most by Otto Frank so the publishing rights should stretch much further…..

    Comment by Dr Kim — February 1, 2017 @ 7:26 am

  2. Knock Knock.
    Whose There?
    Guess.
    Guess who?
    Gestapo. We’d like to ask you some questions about the black market in pectin. Mr. Frank.

    Comment by who dares wings — January 26, 2017 @ 12:49 pm

  3. The Bangor Daily News website that FG mentions in the above article quotes the words of a Jewish historian, named Anthony Wexler, who says the following about the US Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington DC;-

    ” The movement in the museum goes from suffering to redemption, a Christian not a Jewish concept, Wexler said, that meets American sensibilities “.

    So what Mr Wexler is spelling out here is that the museum has not been created or designed for the Jews as their own communal memorial – but purely for the Gentiles to come and learn, and then weep bucket loads of tears over the fate of people who they have no historical connection with whatsoever.

    And I suppose that Mr Wexler’s comment is quite correct. Being “God’s Chosen People”, Jews by definition should not have to undergo any suffering at all, and thus they do not need redemption from anything, because they claim that they were redeemed right from the beginning of time by God Himself.

    But not only does the USHMM propagate this theme of “suffering to redemption” – so do most of the survivor testimonies. They all seem to ratchet up the gruelling horror and degradation to the most excruciating level imaginable and then at the last moment they are rescued by “a miracle” – after which they live out the rest of their lives in great comfort and joy as officially recognised and adored holocaust angels and saints.

    So – one has to ask – are these Jewish survivor testimonies deliberately written this way in order to pull at the heart-strings of the poor old goyim!

    Comment by Talbot — January 26, 2017 @ 11:49 am


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