Scrapbookpages Blog

February 25, 2017

Holocaust survivor says Donald Trump is not the human being to be president

Filed under: Dachau, Holocaust, Trump, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 2:30 pm

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at https://collegian.com/2017/02/holocaust-survivor-shares-experience-in-auschwitz/

Begin quote

[Fanny] Starr is concerned that under the current presidential administration, she will become a victim again.

“I’m very much against this government, and I’m very scared I will become a victim again,” Starr said. “(President Donald Trump) is not the human being to be president.”

Starr says she continues to speak to counteract anti-Semitism present in the world today.

The following quote is from the news artical:

Begin quote

Fanny Starr said she lost her will to live when she entered the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp months before it was liberated by the British.

“I told my sister, ‘I don’t want to live. I don’t have nobody,’” Starr said upon entering Bergen-Belsen.

Starr said her sister, Rena Alter, grabbed her by the collar of her striped outfit.

“She grabbed me by my clothes, stood me up and said, ‘This is our life, no mom, no dad,’” Starr said.

fanny-starr-elliott-jerge2.jpg
Fanny Starr, this year’s featured speaker for Holocaust Awareness Week, shares her story about surviving internment in several Nazi concentration camps during World War II. (Elliott Jerge | Collegian)

Starr shared her experience as a Holocaust survivor in the Nazi concentration camps with over 1200 students Wednesday night for the 20th annual Holocaust Awareness Week. Rebecca Chapman, a freshman at East High School, and Alex Ingber, the Vice President of Students for Holocaust Awareness, asked Starr questions about the Holocaust.

Starr, born in 1922, was a teenager when her family was forced into the Lodz ghetto.

According to Starr, there was very little food, and people received food once a month if they were lucky.

Starr and her family were taken to Auschwitz in a train car of nearly 60 people after the [Lodz] ghetto was liquidated in 1944.

Starr remembers Auschwitz as a horrid place where the Jewish people were stripped of their clothes, and their identities were reduced to numbers. She remembers seeing the writing “Arbei Macht Frei” and Dr. Josef Mengele in his black uniform as she got off the train.

Starr remembers how [Dr.] Mengele assessed each Jew who got off the train and decided who looked healthy enough to work or who would be sent to the gas chambers.

“My youngest sister, (as) we were standing in the line to see him, … pinched my cheeks, and I pinched her cheeks to look (healthy),” Starr said.

Starr remembers laying in a field in Auschwitz, looking up at the night sky as bodies burned in the ovens.

“The sky was red, and the smell was horrid,” Starr said. “You could smell the body smell and the hair smell. We could see the ashes coming down like snow.”

Starr lost her mother and two siblings to the gas chambers in Auschwitz. Her father starved in Dachau.

She said she and her sister came to America in 1951. Starr said they visited a cemetery to say their goodbyes to family members even though their family’s bodies “were just ashes.”

End quote

What can I say about this? She is a typical “liar, liar, pants on fire” Jewish Holocaust survivor.

Natalee Holloway is back in the news

Filed under: True Crime, Uncategorized — Tags: — furtherglory @ 9:25 am

You can read a recent news story here, about the Natalee Holloway case:

http://www.al.com/news/birmingham/index.ssf/2015/05/natalee_holloway_10_years_late.html

I have written several blog posts about Natalee Holloway. Start by reading this one: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2012/10/05/what-really-happened-to-natalee-holloway/

churches not too far away from every death camp

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 6:40 am

The title of my blog post today is a quote from this news article:

https://www.algemeiner.com/2017/02/24/70-years-later-still-no-answers-on-the-holocaust/

Stone path at Treblinka

Photo of stone path at Treblinka is included with news article

My photo of the same path at Treblinka

My photo of same path at Treblinka

A photo of the stone path at Treblinka is included in the news article. The Jews didn’t walk on this path; it was added years later as art work.

Begin quote from news article:

I’ve listened to the stories of Holocaust survivors, studied the history, and read many books about what happened 70 years ago. But for me, the learning never stops. [It never stops for me either]

[…]

So last October, I went to Eastern Europe. I flew to Berlin and took a train up to the Ravensbruck concentration camp, about an hour north of the city. Ravensbruck was the main death camp for women and girls. You may know the name Corrie Ten Boom. She was a Dutch Christian who hid many Jews in her family’s house, but was discovered and sent to Ravensbruck along with her sister. Corrie later watched as her sister was murdered and thrown into the ovens. [Why wasn’t Corrie murdered?]

At the [Treblinka] death camp, I stood where the first German women were trained to be members of the SS. I walked on weather-beaten stones where, years ago, ashes had been thrown. Underneath the stones, the ashes are still there — crying out for redemption. [No the stones were added much later; there are no ashes of Jews under these stones.]

I looked off into the distance, over the small lake, and saw a church steeple. In fact, I saw churches not too far away from every death camp I visited. The people in those churches knew what was going on.

Everywhere I went, it was grey, cold and drizzly. I traveled to the Ravensbruck, Dachau, Terezin, Auschwitz-Birkenau, Chelmno, Lodz, Treblinka, Plazkow and Majdanek death camps.[So did I.]

I also found my way to the small village of Jedwabne in Poland, which had a population of 1,200 before the War; half of these people were Jews.

On July 10, 1941, this village was the site of incomprehensible horror. The Poles forced rabbis to carry the Torah, marching and singing, as they brutally beat the Jews and drove them into a barn. They tied up children, stabbed live babies with pitchforks and threw them screaming into the barn. Then the Poles doused it with kerosene, and burned every Jew alive.

End quote from news article

What I found to be very strange about this woman’s story is that she apparently never questioned why these perpetrators of such violence had such hatred for the Jews. Why were these poor innocent Jews hated so much? Something wrong!

Could it be that the non-Jews in these places were so fed up with the Jews, who were lying, cheating and stealing, that they couldn’t take it any more? And that’s why these Jews were so brutally killed?

I have been to Germany many times, and I lived there for 20 months when my husband was stationed there with the US Army. I have always found that the German people do not get upset easily. They remain calm and do not kill people for no reason.