Scrapbookpages Blog

June 28, 2017

The Holocaust survivor who jumped off a cliff to save himself

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 1:08 pm

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at https://www.thejc.com/culture/film/destination-unknown-mosberg-film-documentary-holocaust-1.440039

The photo above shows Holocaust survivor Ed Mosberg who is still alive

Begin quote from news article:

Later, [Ed] Mosberg found himself in a sweltering, airless cattle wagon [on a train], also bound for Auschwitz. However, when the transport arrived, it sat on the rails for a night, because “they were too busy at the crematorium [where bodies were burned]. So they never unloaded us and they took us [instead] to Mauthausen.”

End quote from news article

So what was it like in the Mauthausen prison?

My photo of the Mauthausen quarry

After working in the Mauthausen quarry, the prisoners in the “punishment detail” had to carry a heavy rock on their backs, up the steps and out of the quarry. Only the prisoners in the “punishment detail” had to do this.

My photo of the Mauthausen stairs which the prisoners had to climb to get out of the quarry

[How did I mange to take the photo above, you ask.]

I hired a taxi to take me to the bottom of the stairs, early in the morning, before the Memorial Site was open to visitors. [So I cheated! Sue me!]

Begin quote from news article:

He [Ed Mosberg] worked in the quarry, where exhausted prisoners ascended and descended [the] 186 steps, carrying rocks weighing up to 50Kg. “If somebody stopped for a moment, they’d push them to their death. Or they’d beat you. Or they’d shoot you,” says Mosberg. “Mathausen and Gusen – they were the two worst concentration camps, and they were classified that way by the Germans.”

End quote from news article

Actually, the prisoners only had to carry one heavy rock out of the quarry, at the end of the day. And that was only if they were in the punishment group.

My photo of a rock carrier used at Mauthausen

You can read about the death statistics for the Mauthausen camp on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/KZMauthausen/History/deathstatistics.html

You can read about the Jewish prisoners at Mauthausen on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/KZMauthausen/History/Jews.html

I have a section about the town of Mauthausen on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/Town/index.html

When I was doing research on Mauthausen, I was told by many people, all of them Jews, that I should not go to the town because there were Jews waiting there to kill people and take everything that the visitors owned.

I decided to risk it anyway, and I found that the people in the town were the most friendly people that I had ever met. I’m glad that I stayed in the town.  You can see my photos of the town at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/Town/index.html

4 Comments »

  1. Lets use common sense here. Is the rock hollow? If not,even a person in top physical shape,is gonna be hard pressed to carry that. Think how densely packed it is. I’m not seeing any void fractures in that stone. Do the math. Height x Width x Depth. Multiply that by its specific gravity. .0975 is universally accepted as an estimate. I don’t think he’s carrying something that heavy. He jumps off the side of a cliff. Reminds me of what my mother would say when I’d say,”well he did it”. She’d come back with,”well if he jumped off a cliff,I suppose you would too.” At any rate. These Jews are in such piss poor shape,how did he keep from breaking a bone ? This is just more BS holo stories,so we feel bad for the Jew . Spinning yarns. Please,shut the f–k up Jew boy.

    Comment by Tim — June 28, 2017 @ 3:56 pm

    • You wrote: Is the rock hollow? If not,even a person in top physical shape,is gonna be hard pressed to carry that.”

      The steps are actually not very steep. When I was there, young people were RUNNING up and down the steps. Only some of the prisoners were required to carry a rock, and then only once a day. Only prisoners who were in the punishment category were required to carry a stone. There is a way to get to the boats that carried the rocks away from the quarry without going up and down these steps.

      When I was there, there was a daily tour bus that took passengers to the bottom of the stairs. I was actually the only old person there who was climbing up and down the stairs. All the other old people took the tour bus.

      Comment by furtherglory — June 28, 2017 @ 5:13 pm

      • I understand that,but I’m talking in terms of mass. The objects resistance to changing its state of motion when force is applied. Sorry,but I don’t even see Arnold Swartzneggar (spellcheck there) changing that rocks mass. If he could,he ain’t gonna carry it to far. Let alone some Jew with a backpack on his back. Seriously. Just estimate the weight of that Boulder (sorry. Something that big I find hard to classify as a “rock”). It’s not gonna small on weight. Just something else in the holo that is BS.

        Comment by Tim — June 29, 2017 @ 3:14 am

    • A usable general average density value for rocks/stone is approx 2.5g/ccm = 2.5g per cubic centimeter — some types of rock are denser, others less dense — just looking at this rock, it must be of at least average density (it looks heavy) — we have to estimate the size of this rock: let’s say it is 60cm x 40cm x 40cm, which looks about right — this means this rock has a volume of 96k ccm — using the average density value of 2.5g/ccm, it weighs 240k grams, which is 240kg — so with these assumptions, this rock weighs approx 530lbs — no average person could carry such a rock at all, let alone up steps — more ‘Holocaust’ bullshit.

      Comment by eah — June 29, 2017 @ 3:05 am


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