Scrapbookpages Blog

July 2, 2017

Should the President be impeached?

Filed under: Trump, Uncategorized — Tags: — furtherglory @ 2:26 pm

You can read a news article here about whether the President should be impeached: http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-impeachment-march-20170702-story.html

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

Thousands of protesters marched down 5th Street and Broadway in downtown Los Angeles on Sunday, chanting, “Down, down, down with Trump — up, up, up with the people” as they urged Congress to impeach the president.

John Meranda, 56 of Long Beach, held a sign showing Trump’s face on the body of a chubby baby, with the word “impeach” spelled out in wooden blocks.

“Every day when I wake up, something is more terrible than it was yesterday,” Meranda said. He has attended all five of the recent anti-Trump marches and plans to keep coming, he said.

He said he’s been most recently frightened by the Republican proposal to cut billions of dollars from the Medicaid program. Meranda is insured privately, he said, “but I have friends who are kept alive by it.”

Further down Broadway, Allen Levenson, 55 of Redondo Beach, and two of his friends clutched a plastic frame supporting a 15-foot-long banner reading, “Illegitimate Corrupt Puppet.”

“It cuts to the heart of his personal insecurities and fears,” said Levinson. “And we wanted something G-rated.”

Levinson has cancer and is undergoing chemotherapy, but chose to attend the march Sunday because showing his displeasure with Trump — “who aspires to be a despot” — and the Republican Congress “is that important,” he said.

The march is one of dozens planned across the country, with demonstrations in California scheduled in Fresno, Orange County, Ventura, San Diego and San Francisco.

The Los Angeles event began about noon at Pershing Square and will end at Fletcher-Bowron Square at Main and Temple streets.

End quote from news article

 

Old ladies don’t blog — or do they?

Filed under: Language, Uncategorized — furtherglory @ 1:50 pm

There used to be a commercial for “Visiting Angels” which showed an attractive old woman sitting in front of a computer while a young girl, who was a “Visiting Angel” sat beside her, helping her with her computer.

At one point, in the commercial, the old lady said something about her “blog.”  After a few days, the word “blog” was cut out of the commercial — probably because many people called in to complain that old women do not blog.

I am an old woman of 84 and I have been blogging for many years. So old women do have blogs. Be careful about what you say because some old woman might blog about it.

Displaced Persons [DPs] then and now

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 11:03 am

As I have mentioned many times, I spent 20 months living in Germany after World War II. My husband was an Army officer. The Army wives lived on the Army base and rarely interacted with the German people.

My husband wanted to “live on the economy” meaning that he wanted to live in a German house, not on the Army base. He wanted to meet the German people and interact with them, so he had rented the upstairs rooms in a German house before I arrived.

As soon as I arrived in Germany, I was taken to the German house, that my husband had rented, and left there all alone while my husband continued doing soldier stuff. Of course, I started crying immediately. My German land lord immediately bounded up the steps and brought me some wine. He spoke to me very soothingly, but I couldn’t understand a word that he said.

Minutes later, two scruffy looking DPs came up the stairs and knocked on my door. They asked me if they could have the cigarette butts from my ash tray. I assumed that they were going to smoke these cigarette butts, and I didn’t want them to do that, so I handed each of them a carton of cigarettes, and they left.

When my landlord saw them leaving with the cigarette cartons, he came running up the stairs, screaming at me not to give these people anything — because they were DPs.  I said “What’s a DP?”

That was my introduction to the aftermath of war and the people who were displaced by war.

I recently posted a video about displaced persons, which you can see by following the link below:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/07/01/video-germany-45-the-other-story-part-1-east-prussia/

I also wrote about the DPs, in the context of the Dachau camp, on my website at

https://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/KZDachau/DachauLife01E.htm

The photo below shows a display in the Dachau museum.

Display about the refugee camp at Dachau

The photo above shows information in the Dachau Museum about the Dachau refugee camp which housed ethnic Germans who had been expelled from the Sudetenland in what is now the Czech Republic, after World War II ended. Many of the “expellees” from the Sudetenland settled in Bavaria where Dachau is located. One of the streets near the former Dachau camp is named Sudetenland Strasse.

Unless visitors spend a lot of time in the Museum at the Dachau Memorial Site, they will probably leave without learning that Dachau was a refugee camp for Volksdeutsche (ethnic Germans) longer than it was a concentration camp. Even then, visitors are likely to be confused about who the refugees were.

Some guides at Dachau tell visitors that the refugees were people from the Soviet Union or Russia who were fleeing Communism, although they were actually Germans who were the victims of ethnic cleansing after German land in East Prussia, eastern Pomerania, eastern Brandenburg and Silesia was given to Poland, and the Sudetenland in the former Czechoslovakia was given to the newly formed Czech Republic.

A total of 9,575,000 ethnic Germans were expelled from the eastern territories of Germany and 3,477,000 were expelled from Czechoslovakia in 1945 and 1946. An additional 1,371,000 ethnic Germans were expelled from Poland. Altogether, a total of 17,658,000 Volksdeutsche were expelled from their homelands and forced to flee to Germany, which was about the size of the state of Wisconsin after World War II. (Source: A Terrible Revenge by Alfred-Maurice de Zayas)

This building was a restaurant for the refugees at Dachau. It was torn down years ago.

The photograph above shows an old building that was used for disinfecting the clothing at Dachau. Before it was torn down, this building was used as a restaurant when the Dachau camp was a refugee camp for Germans who had been expelled from the Sudetenland in what is now the Czech Republic after the war. It was torn down in 1965 to make room for a Memorial Site. The location of the building is where the Jewish Memorial building now stands.

In her book entitled “The High Cost of Vengence,” Freda Utley wrote the following in a Chapter entitled “Our Crimes Against Humanity”:

The Poles, who were given possession of the territory “east of the Oder-Neisse line,” drove out the inhabitants with the utmost brutality, throwing women and children, the aged and the sick, out of their homes with only a few hours’ notice, and not sparing even those in hospitals and orphanages.

The Czechs, no less brutal, drove the Germans over the mountains on foot, and at the frontier stole such belongings as they had been able to carry. Having an eye for profit as well as revenge, the Czechs held thousands of German men as slave laborers while driving out their wives and children.

Many of the old, the young, and the sick died of hunger or cold or exposure on the long march into what remained of Germany, or perished of hunger and thirst and disease in the crowded cattle cars in which some of the refugees were transported. Those who survived the journey were thrust upon the slender resources of starving occupied Germany. No one of German race was allowed any help by the United Nations. The displaced-persons camps were closed to them and first the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA) and then the International Refugee Organization (IRO) was forbidden to succor them. The new untouchables were thrown into Germany to die, or survive as paupers in the miserable accommodations which the bombed-out cities of Germany could provide for those even more wretched than their original inhabitants.

How many people were killed or died will never be known. Out of a total of twelve to thirteen million people who had committed the crime of belonging to the German race, four or five million are unaccounted for. But no one knows how many are dead and how many are slave laborers. Only one thing is certain : Hitler’s barbaric liquidation of the Jews has been outmatched by the liquidation of Germans by the “democratic, peace-loving” powers of the United Nations.

As the Welsh minister, Dr. Elfan Rees, head of the refugee division of the World Council of Churches, said in a sermon delivered at Geneva University on March 13, 1949 : “More people have been rendered homeless by an Allied peace than by a Nazi war.”

The estimate of the number of German expellees, or flüchtlinge as the Germans call them, in Rump Germany is now eight or nine million. The International Refugee Organization (IRO) takes no account of them, and was expressly forbidden by act of Congress to give them any aid. It is obviously impossible for densely over-crowded Western Germany to provide for them. A few have been absorbed into industry or are working on German farms, but for the most part they are living in subhuman conditions without hope of acquiring homes or jobs.

The photos below show reconstructed barracks buildings at the former Dachau camp.

Two reconstructed barracks at Dachau

Door into reconstructed barracks at Dachau

 

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