Scrapbookpages Blog

July 4, 2017

A photo is worth a thousand words

Filed under: Auschwitz, Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — furtherglory @ 4:40 pm

This photo is shown in a recent news article about the Holocaust

My 1998 photo shows same scene

The following quote is from the news article which includes the black and white photo at the top of this page:

Regina teachers studying Holocaust this summer

Begin quote

Four teachers with Regina Catholic high schools are heading back to the classroom this summer — and further afield — while learning about the Holocaust.

Ada Paez, who teaches history at Archbishop M.C. O’Neill High School, is among those joining a summer school course titled The Holocaust in History and Living Memory. It begins in Toronto before the group travels to Europe, where they’ll carry a personal letter by a Holocaust survivor to open while at Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp.

Paez, who has visited Dachau concentration camp in her own travels, knows the field trip will be overwhelming.

“You really feel history,” she said. “You cannot not be shocked … Even if you’ve seen it before, it’s still something that surprises you.”

End quote

Why should anyone be surprised that bodies were burned at Auschwitz, instead of being buried?

These were the bodies of Jews who had died of typhus and other diseases. The bodies were burned to stop the spread of disease. But the students were not told that. The students were told that the Germans are bad people because they burned the bodies of the Jews, instead of giving them a proper Jewish burial.

The crematorium in the main Auschwitz camp, later designated as Krema I, was first put into operation in September 1940; prior to that time, bodies were taken to Gleiwitz to be burned in the city crematorium.

Initially, this crematorium contained two ovens which each had two openings, called muffles or retorts. Bodies were shoved inside by means of the device shown in the photos above. The ovens were deep enough to hold two bodies, placed end to end. A third oven was installed at the end of 1941. Krema I was in operation until July 1943.

The two photos above show one of the two ovens which were reconstructed by the Soviet Union in 1947 when the main camp was turned into the Auschwitz Museum. The small doors at the bottom were for removing the ashes.

The blueprints for the crematorium at Auschwitz show that there were three ovens when the crematorium was in operation. Now there are only two ovens there.

 

12 Comments »

  1. “The ovens were deep enough to hold two bodies, placed end to end.”

    They obviously were not that deep. Why do you keep claiming this?

    “The small doors at the bottom were for removing the ashes.”

    The small doors at the bottom are doors to the fireboxes – where coke was inserted. These are coke-fired ovens. Of course burning the coke would leave ashes; but the ashes from cremating the body would remain in the oven compartment at top. It’s not too clear to me from your description that you are aware of this.

    Comment by blake121666 — July 6, 2017 @ 4:21 pm

    • The crematoriums could not hold two bodies lengthwise and you couldn’t put two bodies on top of each other it would defeat the whole purpose of the heating of the crematoria.
      Some facts…

      Crematory Ovens of AUSCHWITZ and Birkenau in book Dissecting the HOLOCAUST
      Carlo Mottogno

       In his book Auschwitz: Technique and Operation of the Gas Chambers he comes to the following conclusions: x The three double-muffle ovens in crematorium I of Main Camp Auschwitz had a capacity of 340 cremations in a 24-hour period.9 In 1993, he reduced this figure down to 200-250 per day.10 x The five three-muffle ovens in crematoria II and III of Birkenau each had a maximum capacity of between 1,000 and 1,500 cremations per 24 hours,11 but their normal capacity was 1,000 to 1,100 cremations each per 24 hours.12 In 1993, he reduced this figure down to 800-1,000 per day.13 x The two eight-muffle ovens of crematoria IV and V each had a capacity of 500 cremations per 24 hours.

       In his book Auschwitz: Technique and Operation of the Gas Chambers8 he comes to the following conclusions: x The three double-muffle ovens in crematorium I of Main Camp Auschwitz had a capacity of 340 cremations in a 24-hour period.9 In 1993, he reduced this figure down to 200-250 per day.10 x The five three-muffle ovens in crematoria II and III of Birkenau each had a maximum capacity of between 1,000 and 1,500 cremations per 24 hours,11 but their normal capacity was 1,000 to 1,100 cremations each per 24 hours.12 In 1993, he reduced this figure down to 800-1,000 per day.13 x The two eight-muffle ovens of crematoria IV and V each had a capacity of 500 cremations per 24 hours.

      The muffle was a horizontal combustion chamber lined with refractory material. The German “Norms for the construction and operation of furnaces for the cremation of human corpse” enacted in 1937 prescribed the following minimal measures for such a muffle: width: 900 millimeter; height: 900 millimeter; length: 2500 millimeter.

      The operating instructions also indicate that the ovens were designed for the cremation of one body at a time per muffle, since they specify that the bodies had to be introduced successively. On July 3, 1940, in order to “put the crematorium into operation”, the firm Topf also offered “500 ash urns” and “500 fireclay markers” to the SS-Neubauleitung of Auschwitz.112 The latter were numbered plates of fireclay, which were placed on the coffin or directly on the corpse to identify the ashes. In 1946, some of these plates were found near the crematorium II. They were handed over to investigating judge Jan Sehn,113 who, as far as I know, never mentioned them in his findings about his investigations on Auschwitz. This confirms that not even in Birkenau corpses were cremated anonymously in masses, but one at a time

      The 60 min. duration of cremating a single body in the ovens at Birkenau was confirmed by the Topf engineers Kurt Prüfer and Karl Schultze during their interrogation by the Soviet counterespionage service Smersh. During the interrogation on March 4, 1946, K. Schultz stated: “Five ovens were in two crematoria, and three corpses were introduced in each oven [one in each muffle], i.e., there were three openings (muffles) in each oven. In one crematorium with five ovens [and fifteen muffles], one could incinerate fifteen corpses in one hour.” During the interrogation on March 5, 1946, K. Prüfer explained why the cremation lasted so long in the Birkenau crematoria:. “In civil crematoria, pre-heated air is blown in with the help of special bellows, due to which the corpse burns faster and without smoke. The construction of the crematoria for the concentration camps is different; it was not possible to pre-heat the air, as a result of which the corpse burned slower and with developing smoke. In order to reduce the smoke and the smell of a burning corpse, a fan is used. Question: How many corpses would be cremated per hour in a crematorium in Auschwitz? Answer: In a crematorium that had five ovens and fifteen muffles, one cremated fifteen corpses in an hour.” It is therefore established that the average duration of a cremation in Auschwitz was about one hour.

      Comment by Jim Rizoli — July 6, 2017 @ 5:12 pm

    • It looks like I am wrong. Those ovens loaded the coke in the rear. And those doors at the bottom front must therefore be ash removal for the cremains.

      As FG says in her post, these ovens here are reconstructions post-war. And they were not built to exactly how they were during the war according to Mattogno.

      LGR has a piece with pictures about one in Mauthausen which is claimed by Mattogno to be as the Krema I Auschwitz were during wartime:

      https://littlegreyrabbit.wordpress.com/2011/01/02/mauthausen-madness/

      LGR is a bit clueless about what he is looking at though. In the rear of this particular oven are coke gasifiers. So those ovens were NOT coke-fired ovens, they had gasifiers in the back which gasified coke to be burned in the firebox. A gasifier just burns the coke in a low-oxygen environment – which produces CO and some other combustibles. That CO is then rouyted to the firebox and burned. This is the same principle as Fritz Berg’s holtzgas (woodgas) vehicles he talks about – only they gasify wood, not coke.

      So FG was probably correct about the doors at the bottoms. I doubt 2 bodies “placed end to end” could fit in one of those muffles though. Maybe foot to toe though.

      Comment by blake121666 — July 6, 2017 @ 11:09 pm

      • In Mattogno’s “The cremation furnaces of Auschwitz”:

        http://holocausthandbooks.com/dl/24-tcfoa-intro.pdf

        on page 213:

        It says that the Krema I ovens were originally planned to be oil-fired, but then coke generators were added in the back. So the ovens are essentially gas ovens with the gas being gasified coke. Mattogno originally referred to this as “coke-fired” in his earlier books (and probably this one – I haven’t read through this); but that is a misnomer. The gasifier is coke-fired, the oven is gas-fired. BIG difference actually.

        Comment by blake121666 — July 6, 2017 @ 11:31 pm

  2. Here is my long anticipated interview with Holocaust Revisionist Germar Rudolf.
    Right off the video press done a few days ago at his home.
    https://jrizoli.wordpress.com/2017/07/05/jim-rizoli-germar-rudolf-interview-2017/

    JR

    Comment by Jim Rizoli — July 5, 2017 @ 1:24 pm

  3. “I spoke about the enormous strain on the overused furnaces. I told Chief Engineer Sander: I am worried whether the furnaces can stand the excessive usage. In my presence two cadavers were pushed into one muffle instead of one cadaver. The furnaces could not stand the strain.” – Engineer Kurt Prüfer, from the interrogations of Topf und Söhne engineers by the Soviet SMERSH between 1946 and 1948.

    Comment by hermie — July 5, 2017 @ 7:51 am

  4. This is the first time I’ve read that the muffles were capable of holding two cadavers! If two cadavers were placed in the muffle, it would have required more fuel and (I’m thinking even more time). The removal of the ashes, teeth and unconsumed bone fragments would have taken a longer time. So is there anything to be gained by having two muffles capable of holding two cadavers rather than 4 muffles holding one?

    Comment by SHAFAR NULLIFIDIAN — July 4, 2017 @ 9:41 pm

    • This is the first time I’ve read that the muffles were capable of holding two cadavers!

      They weren’t — this is especially so in the case of the Hungarian Jews, who were of normal size and body weight — anyway, two is nothing — the firm that built the ovens at A-B, Topf und Söhne, does not exist anymore — the web site of that name is just another ‘Holocaust’ propaganda site — and there they say:

      In einer Muffel ließ die SS drei bis fünf Leichen verbrennen. Waren die Ermordeten ausgemergelt oder handelte es sich um Kinder, konnten es bis zu acht sein.

      The SS cremated between 3 and 5 bodies at a time in a single muffel — for kids it could be up to 8.

      There are more such absurd claims.

      Comment by eah — July 5, 2017 @ 10:54 am


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