Scrapbookpages Blog

July 6, 2017

Duke and Dutchess of Cambridge will visit former Stutthof camp

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — furtherglory @ 10:50 am

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at https://www.thejc.com/news/uk-news/prince-william-duke-of-cambridge-and-catherine-duchess-of-cambridge-to-visit-poland-1.440860

Begin quote from news article:

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge will visit the former Stutthof concentration camp on a tour of Germany and Poland this month, Kensington Palace has announced.

End quote

I think that the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge could have picked a better Holocaust camp to visit. Why not take a trip to Auschwitz?

The news article continues with this quote:

Begin quote

The five-day tour, which begins on July 17 in the Polish capital, Warsaw, will also see the royals visit the Warsaw Rising Museum and the Berlin Holocaust Memorial, meeting survivors at each location.

The couple are [is] making the trip at the request of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office – and will also meet German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

Kensington Palace said that as well as meeting business, government and civil society leaders, the Duke and Duchess will “pay special attention to getting to known the young people of Poland and Germany”, including mental health campaigners and entrepreneurs.

End quote

On my scrapbookpages.com website, I briefly mentioned Stutthof.

Begin quote from my website:

Some of the Jews who were selected for slave labor were sent to the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria and its subcamps where they worked in German aircraft factories.

Others were sent to the Stutthof camp near Danzig, according to Martin Gilbert, who wrote the following in his book entitled “Holocaust”:

On June 17 Veesenmayer telegraphed to Berlin that 340,142 Hungarian Jews had now been deported. A few were relatively fortunate to be selected for the barracks, or even moved out altogether to factories and camps in Germany. On June 19 some 500 Jews, and on June 22 a thousand, were sent to work in factories in the Munich area. […] Ten days later, the first Jews, 2500 women, were deported from Birkenau to Stutthof concentration camp. From Stutthof, they were sent to several hundred factories in the Baltic region. But most Jews sent to Birkenau continued to be gassed.

According to the Museum at the former Theresienstadt ghetto in what is now the Czech Republic, there were 1,150 Hungarian Jews sent to Theresienstadt and 1,138 of them were still there on May 9, 1945. Other prominent Jews that were sent to Theresienstadt were transferred to Auschwitz in October 1944, including the famous psychiatrist Victor Frankl from Austria, who was not registered in Auschwitz, but was transferred again, after three days in the Birkenau camp, to Dachau and then sent to the Kaufering III sub-camp.

The Jews who were neither gassed nor registered at Auschwitz upon arrival, but instead were transferred to a labor camp, were called Durchgangsjuden because they were held in a transit camp in the Mexico section of the Birkenau camp for a short time.

This page was last updated on June 25, 2008

End quote from my website

I have searched and searched to find more information on the Stutthof camp, but could only find this:

https://www.thejc.com/culture/features/wiener-library-mengele-victims-1.440534

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