Scrapbookpages Blog

July 21, 2017

The fate of African-German children under the Nazis

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Uncategorized — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 2:41 pm

Today, I am responding to a news article about an African-German prisoner at Dachau: http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/21/world/black-during-the-holocaust-rhineland-children-film/index.html

The photo above shows an African-German prisoner at Dachau

In America, we think of African-American children as being Americans. Not so in Germany. The German people wanted Germany to be a “whites only” country of people with German ancestry. Bad Germans.

There was at least one Dachau concentration camp prisoner who had African Ancestry: Johnny Voste, a Belgian resistance fighter who had been arrested in 1942 for alleged sabotage; he was one of the survivors of Dachau.

According to Paul Berben, a former prisoner at Dachau, who wrote a book called “Dachau: 1933 – 1945: The Official History,” there were 67,649 prisoners in Dachau and its sub-camps when the last census was taken on April 26, 1945, three days before the US 7th Army arrived to liberate the camp.

Many of the sub-camps, to which Berben refers, as “Kommandos,” had already been evacuated and the prisoners had been brought to the main camp at Dachau. The largest number of prisoners in the whole Dachau system were classified as political prisoners, who numbered 43,401; the majority of them were Catholic.

The political prisoners included Communists, Social Democrats, anarchists, spies, and anti-Fascist resistance fighters from the Nazi occupied countries such as France, Belgium, Norway, the Netherlands, and Poland.

There was a total of 22,100 Jews in the Dachau system on April 26, 1945 and most of them were in the subcamps. Many of them had just arrived a few days before from other camps that had been evacuated.

On April 27, 1945, a train carrying prisoners evacuated from Buchenwald had arrived at the main camp, but less than half the 5,000 to 6,000 mostly Jewish prisoners who had left Buchenwald were still alive after the 21-day trip and able to walk into the main camp.

On April 26th, approximately 3,400 Jews had been death-marched out of the main camp, headed south toward the mountains where it is believed that the Nazis intended to hold them as hostages to use in surrender negotiations with the Allies. Another 1,735 Jews had been evacuated from Dachau by train on April 26th.

Dachau was the camp where Catholic priests, mostly from Poland, were imprisoned. Approximately 2,700 priests were brought to Dachau, where they were designated as political prisoners because they had been arrested as resistance fighters after the invasion of Poland by the Nazis on Sept. 1, 1939.

There were also German priests incarcerated at Dachau and at least one of them, Father Peter Roth, was there because he had been arrested as a pedophile. Father Roth redeemed himself by volunteering to take care of the sick prisoners in the camp and after the camp was liberated, he stayed on to serve as the priest for the German soldiers who were imprisoned at Dachau. The street that borders the camp on the south side has been named after him.

There were 110 homosexuals, 85 Jehovah’s Witnesses and 1,066 anti-socials in Dachau and its sub-camps on April 26, 1945, according to Berben’s book. The Jehovah’s Witnesses were German citizens who were being held because they had refused to serve in the German army.

What I am trying to explain here is that this African-German prisoner at Dachau was not put into a camp because he had African ancestry.

The following quote is from the news article, cited above:

Begin quote
A new film aims to highlight a Nazi “secret” mission to sterilize hundreds of Afro German children. (CNN)In 1937, mixed race children living in the Rhineland were tracked down by the Gestapo and sterilized on “secret order.” Some were later the subject of medical experiments, while others vanished.

“There were known to be around 800 Rhineland children at the time,” says historian Eve Rosenhaft, professor of German Historical Studies, at the University of Liverpool.

It was a little known part of Holocaust history until Mo Abudu, chief executive of Nigerian media network EbonyLife TV, read an online article by Rosenhaft on the plight of these children.

End quote

He’s not heavy — he’s my brother

Filed under: Music, Uncategorized — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 10:40 am

This morning, I was watching the news on TV when, for some reason, a famous photo was shown, as someone said “He’s not heavy; he’s my brother.”

This was the famous photo of an American soldier carrying a wounded soldier on his shoulders. The caption on this photo was famous, and for years, many people used this expression.

All this reminded me of my college days, when there was a boy who was famous on the campus of the University of Missouri, for dancing with his sister who was crippled. They would frequently dance on the sidewalk in front of the Student Union and there was always a crowd of people watching them.

One day, I said to him: “you are very nice to dance with this crippled girl.”

He answered: “She’s not crippled — she’s my sister.”

Then one day, he asked me to dance with him in front of the student union. I told him that I could not dance well enough to dance with him. He said “Don’t worry, I’ll make you look good.”

He did make me look good, and the crowd of people watching us applauded.

The moral of this story is that you should not worry about looking good yourself — you should make others look good.