Scrapbookpages Blog

August 10, 2017

the gate of death at Auschwitz

Filed under: Auschwitz, Germany, Health, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 9:33 am

The gates of the Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz, Poland, circa 1965. (Getty Images)

My early morning photo of Gate of Death

Concentration camp survivors walk out of the main gate with the sign “Arbeit macht frei” (work will set you free) at the Auschwitz museum, near the former death camp Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, January 27, 2009 marking the 64th anniversary of its liberation by Soviet troops and to remember the victims of the Holocaust. REUTERS/Peter Andrews (POLAND)

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at http://www.cbc.ca/radio/asithappens/as-it-happens-wednesday-edition-1.4240252/canadian-holocaust-survivor-prisoner-88-has-died-here-s-how-he-described-his-time-at-auschwitz-1.4240736

Begin quote from news article:

Sigmund Sobolewski, one of the first prisoners to walk through the gates at Auschwitz, has died. He was 94.

Born in Torun, Poland, in 1923, Sobolewski was only 17 when he was arrested and sent to Auschwitz. Known as Prisoner 88, he was held there for 4 1/2 years.

His inmate number was tattooed on his arm and he never forgot what he went through — and he tried to make sure no one did, either.

End quote

As I have said, and written, many times. I believe that a simple diet, that includes lots of potatoes and very little meat, is the key to living a long life.

Excuse me, I am going to eat a bowl of potato salad now. I am 84 years old and I expect to live to the age of 94.

 

 

14 Comments »

  1. I believe that a simple diet, that includes lots of potatoes and very little meat, is the key to living a long life.

    Believing is one thing, science/data is another.

    To try to correct your course since you are mostly headed in the right direction: it is well known that calorie restriction extends life, often significantly, in laboratory animal — experiments on humans are of course considered unethical, but it is widely presumed that calorie restriction would have similar effects in humans, albeit probably less dramatic.

    I am 84 years old

    Question: When you were growing up, or in your early and mid adult years, did you see many obese people? — compared to today I mean — up until eg the mid-1980s or so, fat people were relatively rare (and were unashamedly called fat) — nowadays there is an obesity epidemic: recent data said 40% of American women are obese; for black women it is approx 60% — why? — answer: bad government sponsored diet advice, and over-consumption of processed foods loaded with carbohydrates.

    lots of potatoes

    I occasionally eat fries because I like them — but potatoes are mostly starch, and therefore the kind of complex carbohydrate best eaten only in small amounts, or avoided.

    Humans evolved over epochs as hunter-gatherers: the basic diet was meat, which was consumed after a successful hunt — in between there was hunger (see below), or whatever could be gathered was eaten — berries, nuts, fruits, other edible plants, etc.

    The era of modern agriculture — ie the intensive cultivation of grains and other sources of dense carbohydrates — began less than 2k years ago — meaning it’s only a very short and recent part of human history — and the fact is, humans just did not evolve to handle this diet — this is why the so-called ‘diseases of modern civilization’ are so prevalent: obesity, diabetes, heart disease, dental caries, etc — these are extremely rare in indigenous people who still eat a diet close to what their ancestors ate, eg some eskimo tribes — Weston Price did a lot of work on this: Weston A Price Foundation.

    Probably the most harmful/dangerous ‘food’ today is sugar, especially high fructose corn syrup — but next time you are in the store look at the ingredients of the processed foods you buy.

    (see below)

    Per the above, throughout their evolution humans normally experienced periods where food was just not available (ancient humans did not have full refrigerators) — so they often went hungry — as it turns out, our bodies are well-adapted to this, and it is actually beneficial for humans today to do intermittent fasting — this promotes autophagy, ie self-consumption: the body feeds itself (so to speak) by consuming intra-cellular junk, whose buildup is known to be a prime contributor to aging.

    Rogue Health and Fitness — a good site to follow for the latest science-based advice on how to eat appropriately and live longer — while oriented toward men (eg the weight lifting part), most of the general health and diet advice applies to both men and women.

    Comment by eah — August 11, 2017 @ 3:05 am

    • Probably the most harmful/dangerous ‘food’ today is sugar

      And to the surprise of most people, grains are no different — to make the connection between grains and sugar clear, and why both are bad for you, consider a few slices of bread, and then imagine scrunching them into a ball in your hand by making a fist — now, if you eat those slices of bread, the effect on your body (eg blood sugar level, insulin activity) is the same as if you had eaten a ball of sugar the same size as the scrunched up bread — there is no difference physiologically.

      Comment by eah — August 11, 2017 @ 3:18 am

      • Eah wrote: “now, if you eat those slices of bread, the effect on your body (eg blood sugar level, insulin activity) is the same as if you had eaten a ball of sugar the same size as the scrunched up bread — there is no difference physiologically.”

        There is a difference physiologically. Bread is full of starch (polysaccharide) while a ball of sugar is made of sucrose (disaccharide). Starch releases monosaccharides (glucose) at a much slower rate in your blood than sucrose does. And given that your body stores any excess monosaccharides as fat and glycogen through insulin, a slow release of glucose (starch) is much less harmful than a fast release of glucose and fructose (sucrose) because a slow release is less likely to cause an excess in your blood at any time.

        Comment by hermie — August 11, 2017 @ 7:45 am

        • A Slice of Whole Grain Bread Raises Your Blood Sugar More Than a Snickers

          Sugar or Bread: Which Raises Blood Sugar More?Sugars and starches are carbohydrates and, eaten in equal amounts, they raise blood sugar about the same. A small brownie (15 grams of carbohydrates) raises blood sugar the same as one slice of bread (15 grams of carbohydrates)…

          Bread should be avoided — its physiological effect is about the same as sugar.

          Comment by eah — August 11, 2017 @ 8:04 am

          • Interesting. Thanks for the update.

            How did they explain the apparent inconsistency of a polysaccharide metabolized as fast as a disaccharide?

            Comment by hermie — August 11, 2017 @ 1:11 pm

          • the apparent inconsistency

            Carbohydrate metabolism — the Wikipedia page has a reasonable discussion of the subject — the science is evolving: the science of diet; obesity, particularly the role of insulin sensitivity in obesity; the origin, prevention, and treatment/control of the so-called ‘diseases of modern civilization’, etc — this has been generally neglected, as well as an area where there’s been a lot of scientific malpractice.

            I’m not a biochemist — I am more interested in the ‘meta information’ I need to know what kind of diet is best — how I can best nourish myself to maintain good health and support my regime to maintain fitness — for this I do not need to understand all the complexities of carbohydrate metabolism.

            I have looked into this seriously for a few years now — long enough to conclude that a lot of the diet advice pushed by nearly every western government for decades has been wrong, and is a prime reason for the obesity epidemic, which is an international tragedy.

            A good place to start: the book Good Calories, Bad Calories by Gary Taubes — it did a lot to heighten interest in what is often called the paleo diet — a diet closer to what our human ancestors ate — a diet humans evolved to eat — but I also have many blogs I follow — many talented researchers are trying to shed light on this complex field, and are decent enough to share their findings — and those of others — with the public — the link I provide above is one such site (of many).

            I still eat bread and other non-paleo foods — but far less often and in far smaller quantities than I used to — after all, life is to be enjoyed…

            Comment by eah — August 11, 2017 @ 1:47 pm

            • Your 1st link talks about “an unpredictable range of glycemic and insulinemic responses.” This suggests that such mechanisms are not well understood yet.

              Comment by hermie — August 11, 2017 @ 2:40 pm

    • You wrote: “it is well known that calorie restriction extends life,”

      I am restricting calories because I am not hungry. My problem is that I am not eating enough calories, so I drink Ensure and similar drinks to get enough calories and vitamins.

      My grandmothers, on both sides, were very fat, but I did not inherit that problem. My mother was also extremely fat, but I did not inherit obesity.

      Comment by furtherglory — August 11, 2017 @ 7:00 am

      • so I drink Ensure

        Here is what I will assume is the typical composition of Ensure — note the significant preponderance of calories from sugar over fat — you do not want this imbalance.

        You should really stop drinking Ensure and eat a proper diet of unprocessed food — force yourself if you must — steam some vegetables, fry a bit of hamburger in a pan, or cook a couple of eggs — this takes only 10m, and there is not much to clean up afterward (none really if you have a dishwasher) — it is a matter of discipline and good health.

        And read the posts on the site I recommended.

        Comment by eah — August 11, 2017 @ 8:12 am

        • You wrote: “You should really stop drinking Ensure and eat a proper diet of unprocessed food — force yourself if you must — steam some vegetables, fry a bit of hamburger in a pan, or cook a couple of eggs..”

          You are missing the point about Ensure. If a person is able to eat hamburger or eggs, they don’t drink Ensure, which is for people who cannot eat for some reason.

          I was first given Ensure when I had a minor operation and I was in the recovery room. I was only able to take one sip of Ensure. A nurse would come into the recovery room every few minutes and try to get me to take another sip. I had to be given an injection because I could not even take one sip of Ensure. After I was transferred to a room, an attendant was in the room with me until I had recovered somewhat. He would give me one sip of Ensure until I was finally able to eat one strawberry or one section of an orange. I still had to drink Ensure until I was able to eat a small meal.

          Comment by furtherglory — August 11, 2017 @ 10:44 am

          • You are missing the point about Ensure.

            I didn’t miss the point — you said you drink Ensure: so I drink Ensure and similar drinks to get enough calories and vitamins — what did I miss?

            Simple question: Are you physically unable to prepare food? — eg due to frailty or illness? — do you not have the means to pay someone to do that for you? — any relatives in the area? — is there no organization in your area that helps older people with such tasks?

            which is for people who cannot eat for some reason

            What is the reason you “cannot eat”? — sorry, but I did not get the impression that you “cannot eat” — I got the impression you (often) just do not want to prepare food — because you lack appetite — me too — but as a matter of discipline, I try to make sure I eat properly — the right kinds of food in the right amount — unless I am fasting, which I do for 24 hours 2x per week — I would never drink Ensure when I was physically able to prepare food.

            Comment by eah — August 11, 2017 @ 12:56 pm

        • You wrote: “You should really stop drinking Ensure and eat a proper diet”

          Some day, you will be old and you might find that you are unable to eat because you have no appetite at all. Your relatives will probably put you into a home for old people where you will be unable to eat a full meal. At that point, you will be given injections to keep you alive. To get you started eating again, you will likely be given Ensure or some other brand of liquid diet. You will be taking sips with a straw, while your relatives stand beside your bed and encourage you. That’s when you will finally understand what Ensure is.

          Comment by furtherglory — August 11, 2017 @ 10:59 am

          • unable to eat because you have no appetite at all

            Sorry, but you are downright silly at times — that is not a reason to not eat — many older people experience lack of appetite — but that does not mean they are “unable to eat” — you put the food in your mouth, chew, and swallow.

            How do you know how old I am? — hint: I am old enough to experience lack of appetite occasionally — but I can eat, so I do — even if I do not really feel like it — but I eat intelligently, which makes that task easier.

            And as I said, going without calories now and then — intermittent fasting — is actually good for you — whereas drinking Ensure as a substitute for eating is not.

            Comment by eah — August 11, 2017 @ 1:01 pm

  2. he was held there for 4 1/2 years

    So he survived a “death camp” for 4.5y — that must be record.

    Comment by eah — August 10, 2017 @ 2:37 pm


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