Scrapbookpages Blog

August 28, 2017

Sometimes monuments have to fall

Filed under: Uncategorized — furtherglory @ 11:08 am

The title of my blog post today is a quote from this news article: http://theconversation.com/from-charlottesville-to-nazi-germany-sometimes-monuments-have-to-fall-82643

The fall of Saddam Hussein statue

Perhaps the most famous example of a monument’s removal for political reasons was the spectacular toppling of Saddam Hussein’s statue in Firdos Square in Baghdad in 2003. Symbolically, it marked the end of Iraq’s Baath dictatorship. This event, staged by the US Army and watched in real-time worldwide, represented the end of the regime even more than Saddam’s actual death by hanging in 2006.

We keep the things that we love the most, but sometimes we also keep the things that reminds us about the horror of the past. Monuments can echo the traumatic events that have shaped our culture, history and civilisation.

A famous example is Memento Park in the outskirts of Budapest in Hungary, where a number of removed statues from the Communist period are kept for visitors to see them and learn about the horrors of the Soviet years. Some also appreciate them as aesthetic objects or a tourist attraction.

End quote

There is another news article about a statue that has been taken down:

On Monday, 54 years after Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his famous “I have a dream” speech and less than a month after a counterprotester was killed following a demonstration by white supremacists in Charlottesville, Va., a statue of the legendary civil rights leader will be unveiled outside the Georgia State Capitol in King’s hometown of Atlanta.

The state Capitol grounds are dominated by the figures from Georgia’s Confederate and segregationist past, including Confederate general and alleged Ku Klux Klan leader John Brown Gordon and U.S. Sen. Richard Russell, one of the staunchest opponents to the civil rights legislation King advocated for.

On Monday, 54 years after Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his famous “I have a dream” speech and less than a month after a counterprotester was killed following a demonstration by white supremacists in Charlottesville, Va., a statue of the legendary civil rights leader will be unveiled outside the Georgia State Capitol in King’s hometown of Atlanta.

The state Capitol grounds are dominated by the figures from Georgia’s Confederate and segregationist past, including Confederate general and alleged Ku Klux Klan leader John Brown Gordon and U.S. Sen. Richard Russell, one of the staunchest opponents to the civil rights legislation King advocated for.

End quote

What does this have to do with anything, you ask. In America today, statues of American citizens who were slave owners are coming down.  I think that it is wrong to tear down those statues.