Scrapbookpages Blog

August 28, 2017

Sometimes monuments have to fall

Filed under: Uncategorized — furtherglory @ 11:08 am

The title of my blog post today is a quote from this news article: http://theconversation.com/from-charlottesville-to-nazi-germany-sometimes-monuments-have-to-fall-82643

The fall of Saddam Hussein statue

Perhaps the most famous example of a monument’s removal for political reasons was the spectacular toppling of Saddam Hussein’s statue in Firdos Square in Baghdad in 2003. Symbolically, it marked the end of Iraq’s Baath dictatorship. This event, staged by the US Army and watched in real-time worldwide, represented the end of the regime even more than Saddam’s actual death by hanging in 2006.

We keep the things that we love the most, but sometimes we also keep the things that reminds us about the horror of the past. Monuments can echo the traumatic events that have shaped our culture, history and civilisation.

A famous example is Memento Park in the outskirts of Budapest in Hungary, where a number of removed statues from the Communist period are kept for visitors to see them and learn about the horrors of the Soviet years. Some also appreciate them as aesthetic objects or a tourist attraction.

End quote

There is another news article about a statue that has been taken down:

On Monday, 54 years after Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his famous “I have a dream” speech and less than a month after a counterprotester was killed following a demonstration by white supremacists in Charlottesville, Va., a statue of the legendary civil rights leader will be unveiled outside the Georgia State Capitol in King’s hometown of Atlanta.

The state Capitol grounds are dominated by the figures from Georgia’s Confederate and segregationist past, including Confederate general and alleged Ku Klux Klan leader John Brown Gordon and U.S. Sen. Richard Russell, one of the staunchest opponents to the civil rights legislation King advocated for.

On Monday, 54 years after Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his famous “I have a dream” speech and less than a month after a counterprotester was killed following a demonstration by white supremacists in Charlottesville, Va., a statue of the legendary civil rights leader will be unveiled outside the Georgia State Capitol in King’s hometown of Atlanta.

The state Capitol grounds are dominated by the figures from Georgia’s Confederate and segregationist past, including Confederate general and alleged Ku Klux Klan leader John Brown Gordon and U.S. Sen. Richard Russell, one of the staunchest opponents to the civil rights legislation King advocated for.

End quote

What does this have to do with anything, you ask. In America today, statues of American citizens who were slave owners are coming down.  I think that it is wrong to tear down those statues.

 

2 Comments »

  1. Actually they should leave the King and Confederate statues up. A reminder how far we’ve come. Only problem is,the morons don’t realize the rebel flag doesn’t represent racism. I’ll bet you a dollar to a donut,kids in school think the only reason for the civil war,was slavery. Fact is out of the entire population of the south,only like 300,000 owned slaves. The south was also for wanting more say in their destiny. They wanted the federal government involved less. The people that fought the war,didn’t fight so they could keep their slaves. Maybe we should blame the north for everything. Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin. Eli was a Yankee . The cotton gin made cotton a profitable product. The plantation owners needed cheap labor. That’s where slavery came in. I’ve said it before. General Lee thought slavery was imoral and a sin. General Jackson would from time to time consult with his man servant Jim Lewis,when he wanted a second or third opinion that he came up with. That don’t sound like a racist to me. Sounds more like General Jackson knew Jim was an intelligent and not just another no–ger. there’s a tree here just outside La Grange. They call it the hanging tree. Yeah a lot of darkies were lynched there. There’s been people wanting that tree cut down for as long as I’ve been living here and before. Fact is ,there’s probably a lot of trees around here that served that purpose. People are just piss ignorant period. I think monuments to Dr. King should be taken down. Don’t get me wrong,I like the way he operated. He was a peaceful man. However at the end of the day,he was still a socialist.

    Comment by Tim — August 28, 2017 @ 4:17 pm

  2. When you start to tear down any statue that becomes a problem. If you don’t like the statue don’t go visit it or don’t go look at it.

    JR

    Comment by Jim Rizoli — August 28, 2017 @ 12:49 pm


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