Scrapbookpages Blog

November 10, 2017

Young students can learn about the Holocaust by playing video games

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 1:31 pm

You can read all about it in this news article: http://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-arts-and-culture/249092/call-of-duty-and-the-holocaust

The following quote is from the news article:

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Released last week, the game, a first-person shooter set in Europe’s killing fields, goes to great lengths to give players the feeling that they’re experiencing a slightly quicker-paced interactive version of a Ken Burns documentary. From D-Day to the Battle of the Bulge, a small band of brothers, American soldiers all, bond as they shoot Nazis by the dozens, making for a game that prides itself as much on its character development and attention to detail as it does its smooth mechanics and great graphics.

Which leaves us, alas, with the question of the Holocaust.

As a serious-minded game, Call of Duty: WWII cannot afford to skip the question of Nazi atrocities. Previous games, although not too many, have tackled the same subject, usually making the horror more palatable by adding fantastical elements to the plot. Cruelty, as titles like 2014’s Wolfenstein: The New Order proved, is easier to stomach when perpetrated by Nazi robots that remind you with every overwrought metallic movement that you’re only playing a silly game. The new Call of Duty is made of sturdier stuff, and as it heads to its conclusion, it enters a concentration camp, determined to keep the same somber and realistic tone it has sustained from the start.

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I wrote about Auschwitz on my website BEFORE I became a Holocaust denier, which means that my website is kosher, and completely devoid of Holocaust denial.

You can read the kosher version of the Holocaust on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/AuschwitzScrapbook/Tour/Auschwitz1/Auschwitz02.html

It was only after I began visiting the Holocaust sites that I became a Holocaust denier. One of the reasons that I became a denier is that I had actually seen a gas chamber in Jefferson City, Missouri, when I was 11 years old, so I knew what a gas chamber was supposed to look like.

I knew that a gas chamber could not have a door with a glass window in it, which could easily be broken by the victims who were being gassed.

Gas pellets were allegedly put into Dachau gas chamber through this opening

The news article continues with this quote:

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What if Call of Duty had allowed us, instead of shooting mindlessly at every German soldier we see, to capture a few of the concentration camp’s guards and then decide whether they deserved fair treatment as prisoners of war or brisk and violent retribution for their hideous crimes? And what if the game took just a bit more of a risk and infused its narrative with, say, interviews with witnesses and survivors? Another stellar indie game, recently released, does just that: Called Attentat 1942, it looks at the Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia by weaving together archival footage, testimonies from civilians who lived under German occupation, interactive comics, and other innovative forms that make gameplay not only entertaining but edifying.

In video games, then, like in cinema, the future seems bittersweet, with a glut of big and loud titles that numb the eye, the mind, and the soul interspersed with a few daring exceptions that help us ponder the question great art has always addressed, which is: What does it mean to be human?

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