Scrapbookpages Blog

November 16, 2017

The gassing of the Hungarian Jews

Filed under: Auschwitz, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 1:01 pm

The Holocaust was mainly the gassing of the Hungarian Jews at Auschwitz. The photo below shows Hungarian men on their first day at Auschwitz-Birkenau. Their heads have been shaved to get rid of any lice that they might have had.

Hungarian  Jewish men who have been humiliated on their first day at Auschwitz

The photo below shows how the Hungarian Jews were humiliated by having to go through a selection process: those who couldn’t work were allegedly sent to the gas chamber immediately upon arrival.

Hungarian Jews had to go through a selection

The photo above, taken at Auschwitz on May 26, 1944, shows the selection process which took place immediately after the Hungarian Jews got off the train inside the Birkenau camp.

The men and women had to line up in two separate lines to be examined by an SS officer who decided who would live and who would be sent immediately to the gas chamber. Note the yellow stars which the Hungarian Jews had been forced to wear on their coats even before they were sent to camps.

The Auschwitz II camp, also known as Birkenau, had enough barracks to accommodate 200,000 prisoners and another section, called Mexico by the prisoners, was under construction. When finished, the new section would have provided housing for 50,000 more prisoners.

According to Daniel Goldhagen, the author of the best-selling book entitled “Hitler’s Willing Executioners,” the Nazis were in a frenzy to complete the genocide of the Jews before the end of the war. Even though the Nazis were desperate for workers in their munitions factories, it was more important to them to carry out the Final Solution to the Jewish Question, according to Goldhagen who wrote the following:

Begin quote from Goldhagen’s book:

Finally, the fidelity of the Germans to their genocidal enterprise was so great as seeming to defy comprehension. Their world was disintegrating around them, yet they persisted in genocidal killing until the end.

End quote

In June 1944, Adolf Eichmann deported 20,000 Hungarian Jews to Auschwitz and then transferred them to the Strasshof labor camp near Vienna. This was an attempt to extort money from the Jewish community in Hungary, according to Laurence Rees who wrote in his book “Auschwitz, a New History,” that Eichmann convinced the Jewish leaders that he was going against orders in making an exception for these Jews and then demanded money for food and medical care because he had saved 20,000 Jews from the gas chambers at Auschwitz.

David Cesarani wrote in “The Last Days,” that Jewish leader Rudolf Kastner was able to prod Eichmann into sending these Jews to Austria where three quarters of them survived the war.

The last mass transport of 14,491 Hungarian Jews to Auschwitz arrived on July 9, 1944, according to a book entitled “Die Zahl der Opfer von Auschwitz,” by Franciszek Piper, the director of the Auschwitz Museum. After this mass transport of Jews left Hungary on July 8, 1944, Horthy ordered the deportation of the Hungarian Jews to stop.

By that time, a minimum of 435,000 Hungarian Jews, mostly those living in the villages and small towns, had been transported to Auschwitz, according to evidence given at the trial of Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem in 1961 in which transportation lists compiled by Laszlo Ferenczy, the chief of police in Hungary, were introduced.

On July 14, 1944, Adolf Eichmann attempted to deport another 1,500 Jews, but Horthy ordered the train to turn around before it could make it past the Hungarian border. On July 19th, Eichmann ordered the 1,500 Jews to be loaded onto the train again and rushed out of the country.

On August 13, 1944, a small transport of 131 Jews arrived from Hungary at Auschwitz and on August 18, 1944, the last transport of 152 Jews arrived.

In a telegram sent to the Foreign Office in Berlin on July 11, 1944 by Edmund Veesenmayer, it was reported that 55,741 Jews had been deported from Zone V by July 9th, as planned, and that the total number of Jews deported from Zones I through V in Hungary was 437,402

[That’s all she wrote — and she rubbed that out]  The words in an old song from long ago.

Don’t rock the Juke box — I wanna hear me some Jones

Filed under: Music — furtherglory @ 8:16 am

There was a time, long ago, in America when everyone knew who country singer George Jones was. On a Saturday night, half the people in America were sitting a few feet away from their radio, as they listened to George Jones sing.

The following information is from Wikipedia:

George Glenn Jones (September 12, 1931 – April 26, 2013) was an American musician, singer and songwriter. He achieved international fame for his long list of hit records, including his best known song “He Stopped Loving Her Today“, as well as his distinctive voice and phrasing. For the last twenty years of his life, Jones was frequently referred to as the greatest living country singer.[1][2] Country music scholar Bill C. Malone writes, “For the two or three minutes consumed by a song, Jones immerses himself so completely in its lyrics, and in the mood it conveys, that the listener can scarcely avoid becoming similarly involved.” Waylon Jennings expressed a similar opinion in his song “It’s Alright”: “If we all could sound like we wanted to, we’d all sound like George Jones.” The shape of his nose and facial features earned Jones the nickname “The Possum.”[3]

Born in Texas, Jones first heard country music when he was seven and was given a guitar at the age of nine. He married his first wife, Dorothy Bonvillion, in 1950, and was divorced in 1951. He served in the United States Marine Corps and was discharged in 1953. He married Shirley Ann Corley in 1954. In 1959, Jones recorded “White Lightning,” written by J. P. Richardson, which launched his career as a singer. His second marriage ended in divorce in 1968; he married fellow country music singer Tammy Wynette a year later. Many years of alcoholism caused his health to deteriorate severely and led to his missing many performances, earning him the nickname “No Show Jones.”[4] After his divorce from Wynette in 1975, Jones married his fourth wife, Nancy Sepulvado, in 1983 and became mostly sober. Jones died in 2013, aged 81, from hypoxic respiratory failure. During his career, Jones had more than 150 hits, both as a solo artist and in duets with other artists.

End quote from Wikipedia