Scrapbookpages Blog

November 19, 2017

Warsaw Ghetto museum will soon be built

Filed under: Holocaust — furtherglory @ 1:43 pm

You can read here about the new museum that will be built soon: http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/poland-to-build-warsaw-ghetto-museum-122649

The following quote is from the article:

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Poland will build a museum focused on life and death in the infamous World War II-era Warsaw Ghetto, where Nazi Germany imprisoned nearly 500,000 Jews during the Holocaust, a minister said on Nov. 17.

“The museum will be located in a building that had been used as a children’s hospital inside the ghetto and will be established in collaboration with the Jewish Historical Institute,” Culture Minister Piotr Glinski told reporters, without specifying a timeline.

“It was the largest ghetto in the Nazi-occupied Europe and the most tragic, there is so much to tell,” Pawel Spiewak, who heads the Jewish Historical Institute, told AFP.

The former hospital, located in the heart of the Polish capital, stands right next to the only remaining fragment of the ghetto wall.

Janusz Korczak, a renowned pre-war Polish-Jewish children’s author and pediatrician, worked at the hospital before the war.

The innovative educator who cared for orphans in the Warsaw Ghetto, died along with his young charges in the gas chambers of the Treblinka death camp.

He and the nearly 200 orphans in his care were among the 260,000 Jews who perished in the ghetto’s liquidation, launched in July 1942.

A year after invading Poland on September, 1 1939, Nazi Germany set up the Warsaw Ghetto in the heart of the occupied Polish capital in October 1940.

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I have a section on my scrapbookpages.com website about the Warsaw Ghetto: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Poland/WarsawGhetto/index.html

Start by reading this page on my website:

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Poland/WarsawGhetto/Introduction.html

The following quote is from my website:

Before World War II started on September 1, 1939, there were 375,000 Jews living in Warsaw, as many as in all of France, and more than in the whole country of Czechoslovakia. Only the city of New York had a larger Jewish population than Warsaw.

The first Jews had settled in Warsaw after King Kasimierz the Great welcomed Jewish refugees from Western Europe to Poland in the 14th century, but during the 15th century they were expelled from the city of Warsaw, just as they were in Krakow. Between 1527 and 1768, Jews were banned from living in Warsaw.

After Poland was partitioned for the third time in 1795 between Russia, Prussia and Austria, the Jews began coming back to Warsaw, which was in the Russian section, and by the start of World War I, Jews made up forty percent of the population of the city. During the 19th century and up until the end of World War I, Warsaw was in the Pale of Settlement where all Russian Jews were forced to live; when Poland regained its independence after World War I, Warsaw was once again a Polish city. From the beginning, the Jewish district was located southeast of Old Town Warsaw.

The Nazis liked to take action against the Jews on Jewish holidays, so it was on Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement, that the announcement was made on October 12, 1940 that “Jewish residential quarters” were to be set up in Warsaw. The Ghetto would comprise 2.4 percent of the city’s land, but would contain 30% of the city’s population, according to the U.S. Holocaust Museum. To create the Ghetto, the Nazis moved 113,000 Christian residents out and moved 138,000 Jewish residents in. The rest of the Warsaw Jews were already living in the neighborhood of the Ghetto.

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The story of Bergen-Belsen

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 10:10 am

Years ago, I wanted to visit Bergen-Belsen, so I called a cab and said to the driver: “take me to Bergen-Belsen”. He said “which one — Bergen or Belsen”. I was stumped. I didn’t know that Bergen and Belsen were two different places.

All of this came back to me today, when I read this news article: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-sydney/holocaust-survivor-olga-horek-shares-story-of-liberation-as-jewish-museum-celebrates-25-years/news-story/61a9cf16d86a4cec72ba71bdb3530694

The following quote is from the news article:

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When Olga Horak was liberated from the Holocaust camp Bergen-Belsen in 1945 she had lost her whole family. She was 16 years old, had typhus, weighed 29kg and was carrying a blanket.

The blanket was made by her fellow death camp prisoners, who had been forced to weave their own hair with wool to make a warm covering for their Nazi wardens.

When the camp was liberated by British and Canadian forces, the Nazis fled, leaving behind a decimated population of Jews from all over Europe and importantly for Horak, the blanket.

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Olga Horak is shown in the photo below

For Mrs. Horak, who survived five death camps, the blanket and the museum serve as a powerful reminder: we must never forget.

[My comment: How does one survive 5 death camps? Are Jews that hard to kill?]

“I feel compelled to talk about it, to teach the younger generation in order never to forget what happened,” Mrs Horak said.

“This is history, it cannot be erased and … as long as we can talk, we do ask the people who are willing to listen to us to listen,” she said.

Founded by the late John Saunders AO and members of the Australian Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors and Descendants in 1992, the museum has grown over the past 25 years to become an integral part of the cultural life of Sydney and a second home to many Holocaust survivors.

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