Scrapbookpages Blog

December 8, 2017

Holocaust survivor Alice Lok Cohana has died at 88 years old

Filed under: Auschwitz, Holocaust — Tags: — furtherglory @ 2:30 pm
KRT KIDS NEWS STORY SLUGGED: HOLOCAUST KRT PHOTOGRAPH VIA CHICAGO TRIBUNE  (KN5-February 11) Alice Lok Cahana recalls celebrating the Sabbath with her sister while hiding in Bergen-Belsen s latrines, pictured behind her, during World War II. Cahana is one of five Hungarian Holocaust survivors interviewed in the film 'The Last Days,' the new documentary produced by Steven Spielberg.  The Last Days,' (PG-13) which opens friday, survivors revisited concentration camps and the towns where they grew up. (TB) AP,PL 1999 (Horiz B&W Only) Photo: HO / CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Alice Lok Cahana recalls celebrating the Sabbath with her sister while hiding in Bergen-Belsen’s latrines.

You can read about the death of Alice Lok Cohana at http://www.chron.com/news/houston-deaths/article/Alice-Lok-Cahana-artist-and-Holocaust-survivor-12417040.php#photo-14674373

Several years ago, I wrote the following about Alice Lok Cohana on my website:

Begin quote from my website:

One of the Hungarian Jews who survived Auschwitz was Alice Lok Cahana, whose story was recounted by Laurence Rees in his book entitled “Auschwitz, a New History.”

Alice was 15 when she was registered in the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp, but months later she was sent to the gas chamber in Krema V and told that she would be given new clothes after taking a shower. The purpose of the red brick Krema V building was deceptively disguised by red geraniums in window boxes, according to Alice.

She was inside the gas chamber in Krema V when the revolt by the Sonderkommando unit in Krema IV began on October 7, 1944. This was the occasion when the Sonderkommando blew up the Krema IV gas chamber building with dynamite that had been sneaked into Auschwitz-Birkenau by some of the women prisoners who worked in factories outside the camp.

houston artist and Holocaust survivor, Alice Cahana, is featured in Steven Spielberg's documentary, THE LAST DAYS.  photo shot 2/16/99 HOUCHRON CAPTION (02/18/1999): Alice Lok Cahana keeps memories of concentration camp horrors and small blessings alive in her paintings and in her testimony in the Oscar-nominated film "The Last Days.'' Photo: Kevin Fujii / Houston Chronicle

Alice Lok Cahana The recent news article left out here survival story.

Laurence Rees wrote:

But the revolt did save some lives. It must have been because of the chaos caused by the Sonderkommando in crematorium 4 that the SS guards emptied the gas chamber of crematorium 5 next door without killing Alice Lok Cahana and her group.

End quote

naked game of tag in Nazi gas chamber

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust — Tags: — furtherglory @ 11:50 am
Game of naked tag filmed in Nazi death camp of Stutthof. (Screen capture/Museum of Modern Art in Warsaw)

Stutthof gas chamber tag

You can read about the naked games of tag in a Nazi gas chamber in this November 29th, 2017 news article in the Times of Israel:  https://www.timesofisrael.com/jewish-groups-demand-poland-explain-naked-game-of-tag-in-nazi-gas-chamber/

I wrote about the naked games of tag on this previous blog post about an article on the same subject in the New York Post:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/11/30/naked-tag-game-inside-nazi-gas-chamber/

The following quote is from a page on my web site:

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/AuschwitzScrapbook/History/Articles/HungarianJews1.html

Begin quote

Nerin E. Gun was a Turkish journalist who was imprisoned at Dachau in 1944; his job was to take down the names and vital information from Hungarian Jewish women who were on their way to be gassed in the fake shower room in the Dachau crematorium.

In his book entitled “The Day of the Americans,” published in 1966, Gun wrote the following regarding his work at Dachau:

I belonged to the team of prisoners in charge of sorting the pitiful herds of Hungarian Jewesses who were being directed to the gas chambers. My role was an insignificant one: I asked questions in Hungarian and entered the answers in German in a huge ledger. The administration of the camp was meticulous. It wanted a record of the name, address, weight, age, profession, school certificates, and so on, of all these women who in a few minutes were to be turned into corpses. I was not allowed in the crematorium, but I knew from the others what went on in there.

Some of the Jews who were selected for slave labor were sent to the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria and its subcamps where they worked in German aircraft factories.

Others were sent to the Stutthof camp near Danzig, according to Martin Gilbert, who wrote the following in his book entitled “Holocaust”:

On June 17 Veesenmayer telegraphed to Berlin that 340,142 Hungarian Jews had now been deported. A few were relatively fortunate to be selected for the barracks, or even moved out altogether to factories and camps in Germany.

On June 19 some 500 Jews, and on June 22 a thousand, were sent to work in factories in the Munich area. […] Ten days later, the first Jews, 2500 women, were deported from Birkenau to Stutthof concentration camp. From Stutthof, they were sent to several hundred factories in the Baltic region. But most Jews sent to Birkenau continued to be gassed.

According to the Museum at the former Theresienstadt ghetto in what is now the Czech Republic, there were 1,150 Hungarian Jews sent to Theresienstadt and 1,138 of them were still there on May 9, 1945.

Other prominent Jews that were sent to Theresienstadt were transferred to Auschwitz in October 1944, including the famous psychiatrist Victor Frankl from Austria, who was not registered in Auschwitz, but was transferred again, after three days in the Birkenau camp, to Dachau and then sent to the Kaufering III sub-camp.

The Jews who were neither gassed nor registered at Auschwitz upon arrival, but instead were transferred to a labor camp, were called Durchgangsjuden because they were held in a transit camp in the Mexico section of the Birkenau camp for a short time.

End quote

 

 

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