Scrapbookpages Blog

January 4, 2018

Don’t make fun of Auschwitz survivors — you could go to prison for this crime

Filed under: Auschwitz, Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 12:56 pm

You can read all about it at http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/german-man-sentenced-prison-making-fun-holocaust-52138113

There were many survivors of Auschwitz, and some of them are still alive. It is very cruel to make fun of a survivor. The survivors of the Holocaust are sacred people, and you must bow down before them.

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

A 32-year-old German neo-Nazi has been sentenced to 18 months in prison for incitement after posting a picture of a miniature of the Auschwitz death camp on Facebook with an offensive caption.

Judge Manfred Weber at the district court in Hohenstein-Ernstthal in eastern Germany told the man Thursday “you made fun of Auschwitz survivors — that’s very bad.”

The German news agency dpa reported that the sentence of the previously convicted neo-Nazi also took into consideration his earlier charge for criminal assault and the posting of a photomontage of Adolf Hitler in combination with a swastika and firecrackers. The display of Nazi emblems is illegal in Germany.

The man from Glauchau in Saxony, whose name was not given in line with German privacy rules, can appeal the conviction.

End quote

What a revolting development this is!  Imagine making fun of a Holocaust survivor. There are many Auschwitz survivors still alive. I have an explanation for that. The Auschwitz prisoners had a potato based diet.  I ate potatoes every day when I was a child, and I think that that is why I’m still alive.

Hillary’s private server

Filed under: True Crime — furtherglory @ 11:59 am

What is wrong with having a private e-mail server?

Nothing.

Why would anyone want to have a private e-mail server?

If you have an e-mail server, you can see where your e-mails are coming from, which may not be where they are claiming to come from.

I know all this because I once had a private e-mail server.  I am not in prison, because I did not comit a crime. It is not against the law to have a private e-mail server.

The story of Rudolf Hess (not Rudolf Hoess)

Filed under: Germany, World War II — furtherglory @ 8:25 am

Rudolf Hess is sometimes confused with Rudolf Hoess. Many people mispronounce the name Hoess, which leads to confusion.

Here is the real story:

On May 10, 1941, Hitler’s deputy, Rudolf Hess, flew to Scotland in a Messerschmitt 110 airplane and parachuted out before the plane crash-landed.

Hess made this trip in an attempt to negotiate peace with the British and end the war on the western front, so that Germany could then attack Russia without worrying about fighting on two fronts.

Hess was promptly arrested as soon as his parachute touched the ground, and he was held in prison for the duration of the war. At the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal, after the war, Hess was convicted of Crimes against Peace and sentenced to life in prison.

Finally on June 22, 1941, Germany invaded the Soviet Union in a pre-emptive strike against Communism, or Judeo-Bolshevism, as the Nazis called it, and the killing of innocent Jewish civilians by special soldiers called the Einsatzgruppen began. All of this could have been prevented if the Allies had taken immediate action on March 12, 1938 when Hitler and his troops marched triumphantly into Austria in defiance of the Treaty of Versailles.

The failure of the Allies to act immediately at the first sign of Nazi aggression, and the appeasement of Hitler at Munich in 1938 has been frequently cited by historians and politicians as an object lesson in history whenever new dictators like Miloslovich or Saddam Hussein have emerged to threaten America’s freedom.

According to William Shirer, a famous American correspondent in Europe during that period, there was so little American interest in the fate of Austria that he had a very difficult time persuading CBS to allow him to report the story of the Anschluss on the radio.

End of Story — That’s all she wrote — and she rubbed that out.