Scrapbookpages Blog

January 19, 2018

Teaching the Holocaust in American schools

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 3:05 pm

I wrote about this subject in this previous blog post:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2010/03/12/should-the-holocaust-be-taught-in-american-schools/

I am putting this up again because I don’t think that the Holocaust should be taught in American schools.

A Holocaust museum in Brooklyn

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 12:49 pm

This news article tells about the Jews during the Holocaust: http://www.buckscountycouriertimes.com/news/20180118/holocaust-museum-in-brooklyn-focuses-on-faith-survival

Begin quote from news article:

A group of teenage girls from a private Jewish school clustered around the vitrines during a recent visit and learned about the Walkin family, who fled Lithuania on the Trans-Siberian Railway in 1941, landing first in Kobe, Japan, and then in Shanghai. Program coordinator Miryam Gordon pointed out sabbath candlesticks adorned with Chinese characters.

“Daily life continued,” she said. “Children were born. People got married.”

Reidel’s own grandfather, Mike Tress, is featured in Amud Aish’s collection for his work trying to secure passage for European Jews to the United States or another safe haven.

Faith and survival, not the machinery of death, are the central themes at an atypical Holocaust museum in Brooklyn.

The 3-year-old Amud Aish Memorial Museum, located far from the tourist crowds at near the very edge of the borough, focuses on the experiences of Orthodox Jews during and after the Holocaust.

Its collection includes letters, diaries, photos and religious items, like a frayed prayer shawl worn secretly by a prisoner at Auschwitz.

Many were donated by Orthodox and ultra-Orthodox Jews who had stashed the artifacts in basements and attics would not have given them to another museum, Amud Aish staffers said.

“Part of that is because their culture is different and they don’t patronize museums for the most part,” said Shoshana Greenwald, director of collections. “But here they felt this was a museum that would tell their story and understand where they are coming from.”

The collection includes the Warsaw Ghetto diary of Hillel Seidman, who wrote about Jews’ daily struggle to survive and to practice their religion in the face of horrific persecution.

“It’s a well-known diary,” said Dovid Reidel, the museum’s director of research. “This is the original.”

The family of Seidman, who survived the Holocaust and died in 1995, gave the diary to Amud Aish because they “felt other museums will just focus on his general story,” Reidel said. “They felt he wouldn’t be appreciated from his religious dimension as well.”

Currently housed in a temporary space downstairs from a home health care company, far from city subway lines, the Amud Aish Memorial Museum has long planned on moving to a more prominent location. When it opened in the remote Mill Basin neighborhood, there were plans to build an $11 million permanent museum in the borough’s Borough Park section, home to a huge and growing population of Orthodox Jews. Sholom Friedmann, the museum’s director and CEO, said there’s now no fixed date for a move.

An exhibit that officially opens at the museum later this month tells the little-known story of thousands of Jews who found refuge in Japanese-occupied Shanghai, China.

A group of teenage girls from a private Jewish school clustered around the vitrines during a recent visit and learned about the Walkin family, who fled Lithuania on the Trans-Siberian Railway in 1941, landing first in Kobe, Japan, and then in Shanghai. Program coordinator Miryam Gordon pointed out sabbath candlesticks adorned with Chinese characters.

“Daily life continued,” she said. “Children were born. People got married.”

Reidel’s own grandfather, Mike Tress, is featured in Amud Aish’s collection for his work trying to secure passage for European Jews to the United States or another safe haven.

End quote from news article

“Death at Nuremberg” is in the news

Filed under: Germany — furtherglory @ 9:39 am

You can read about “Death at Nuremberg” in this news article: http://www.militarypress.com/death-at-nuremberg/

Begin quote from news article:

“Death at Nuremberg” by W.E.B. Griffin and William E. Butterworth IV is more than a thriller. These authors have a knack for telling a riveting story that is intertwined with historical facts. It is a reminder of past history and the plot supports how history in many ways is repeating itself. Some of the facts are so incredibly gripping they can make a thriller in and of themselves.

This plot covers the time period when the Nuremberg war trials began, with covert intelligence agent Capt. James Cronley Jr. having to handle many fronts: the Russians, Nazis and a bureaucracy. He has been reassigned from the chief, DCI-Europe to protecting the Nuremberg U.S. Chief Prosecutor Robert Jackson and the American Judge Francis Biddle from a possible Soviet NKGB kidnapping. In addition to that, he is still hunting down and dismantling Odessa, an organization dedicated to helping Nazi war criminals escape to South America.

End quote from news article

You can also read about Nuremberg on my website. The following is a quote from my scrapbookpages.com website:

Nürnberg castle after it was restored

The city of Nürnberg, in the German state of Bavaria, is famous for its medieval walls and ancient castle, gingerbread cookies, toy manufacturing, Gothic churches, Nürnberger bratwurst and the Christmas market.

The city dates back to the year 1050 and for around 500 years, it was the unofficial capital of the Holy Roman Empire, sometimes referred to by historians as the First Reich or first German empire.

The National Socialists made Nürnberg the unofficial capital of their empire, which became known as the Third Reich. The Second Reich was the unification of the German states in 1871.

In January 1945, 90% of the old city of Nürnberg was destroyed when it was bombed by the Allies because of its historic importance to Hitler and the Nazis.

The famous Nürnberg Castle and the city wall were damaged in the bombing raid, but have been restored. Much of Nürnberg was rebuilt to look like the original, but there are also modern buildings, as shown in the photo below.

Modern buildings in Nuremberg

Church in the heart of Nürnberg

On April 20, 1945 (Hitler’s 56th birthday), the city was captured by three divisions of the American Seventh Army, after a fierce battle that had lasted for several days.

It was at the Zeppelin Field, just outside the city of Nürnberg, that the National Socialists staged huge annual party rallies in the 1930ies. The rally would be preceded by a performance of the Wagnerian opera, “Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg,” the story of Hans Sachs, which was Hitler’s favorite.

Because of its close association with the Nazi party, the city of Nürnberg was chosen as the site of the International Military Tribunal, the war crimes trial, which started in November 1945 at the Justizgebäude (Palace of Justice).

After the war, Nuremberg was in the American zone of occupation and American troops were stationed in the city until 1992.

Building in the city of Nuremberg

Nürnberg is also famous for the 1935 Nuremberg Laws, which defined who was a Jew, based on heredity, and allowed German citizenship only to ethnic Germans. The Nuremberg Laws denied the Jews the right to fly the Nazi flag, but at the same time, protected the right of the Zionists to fly their own flag, which is now the flag of Israel.

The Nuremberg Laws formed the basis for the plans that were made on January 20, 1942 for the “Final Solution of the Jewish Question,” since this law was used to determine who would be transported, from Germany and the Nazi occupied countries, to the concentration camps in the East.

Street scene in the city of Nürnberg

Tower at one of the old gates into the city

Hotel Deutscher Kaiser with tower in the background

Photos of a house in the former village of Altenfurt, which has been incorporated into the city of Nürnberg are shown on this page.

Bomb Damage

Bombed Churches

Castle

Hans Sachs

Zeppelin Field

Palace of Justice