Scrapbookpages Blog

March 30, 2018

Geseke, a charming town in Germany

Filed under: Germany — furtherglory @ 1:49 pm

Many years ago, I visited the town of Geseke in Germany. I took photos and put them on my website.

You can see my photos at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Geseke/index.html

You can see photos of the churches in Geseke at

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Geseke/Churches/index.html

What does this have to do with anything? You ask. It shows you what Germany used to be, before the Jews took over and ruined everything.

 

 

Do piles of clothing in the Nazi concentration camps prove that Jews were killed?

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 12:51 pm

On May 5, 1945, Dutch resistance fighter Pim Boellaard was interviewed about his ordeal during his three years of captivity in a German concentration camp. As a resistance fighter, who continued to fight after the surrender of the Netherlands, he did not have the same protection as a POW under the Geneva Convention of 1929.

He was one of 60 Dutch “Nacht und Nebel” prisoners who were transferred from the Natzweiler concentration camp to the Dachau camp in September 1944. Boellaard was a member of the International Committee of Dachau, representing approximately 500 Dutch prisoners at Dachau.

In the Dachau camp, there were piles of clothing waiting to be deloused in the four disinfection chambers at the south end of the crematorium building. The photo below, which is stored in the National Archives in Washington, DC, was printed in newspapers in 1945 with this caption:

Tattered clothes from prisoners who were forced to strip before they were killed, lay in huge piles in the infamous Dachau concentration camp.

Piles of clothing waiting to be deloused.

There was a typhus epidemic raging in the Dachau camp and 900 prisoners were dying of the disease when the liberators arrived, according to the account of Marcus J. Smith. Smith was an Army doctor, who along with 9 others, formed Displaced Persons Team 115, which was sent to Dachau after the liberation of the camp.

In his book entitled “Dachau: The Harrowing of Hell,” Smith wrote that eleven of the barracks buildings at the Dachau camp had been converted into a hospital to house the 4,205 sick prisoners. Another 3,866 prisoners were bed ridden.

Smith put the total number of survivors at around 32,600, but said that between 100 and 200 a day were still dying after the camp was liberated. He mentioned that the American Army tried to keep the freed prisoners in the camp to prevent the typhus epidemic from spreading throughout the country. Typhus is spread by lice, and the clothing was being deloused in an attempt to stop the epidemic.

The 116th Evacuation Hospital arrived at Dachau on the 2nd of May, 1945 to take care of the typhus victims.

Do “stumbling stones” force people to remember the Holocaust?

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 10:16 am

“Stumbling stones” are mentioned in this recent news article: https://forward.com/fast-forward/397904/germanys-far-right-decries-holocaust-memorials-for-dictating-who-should-be/

The following quote is from the news article:

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Amid rising anti-Semitism across Europe, Germany’s far-right party is lashing out at the famous “stumbling stones” Holocaust memorials, CNN reported.

The Stolperstein — small cobble stones with a brass plaque commemorating a victim of the Holocaust — can be found in cities across Europe. Their creator, the sculptor Gunter Demnig, dubbed them stumbling stones because they are designed to draw your attention by slightly catching your feet.

“You won’t fall. But if you stumble and look, you must bow down with your head and your heart,” Demnig said.

But now Germany’s Alternative for Germany (AfD) party is decrying stones as forcing people to remember the Holocaust.

“With their actions, the stumbling stone initiators impose a culture of remembrance on their fellow human beings, dictating to them how they should remember who and when,” AfD lawmaker Wolfgang Gedeon wrote in February. “Who gives these obtrusive moralists the right to do so?”

Read more: https://forward.com/fast-forward/397904/germanys-far-right-decries-holocaust-memorials-for-dictating-who-should-be/

End quote

Sorry — I am totally against “stumbling stones”. There are already streets in Germany where a person has to look down on the sidewalk to avoid stumbling. The streets should be smooth, so that tourists can look at the buildings, not at the sidewalk, when they are walking around German cities.

The news article continues with this quote:

Begin quote

The Stolperstein — small cobble stones with a brass plaque commemorating a victim of the Holocaust — can be found in cities across Europe. Their creator, the sculptor Gunter Demnig, dubbed them stumbling stones because they are designed to draw your attention by slightly catching your feet.

“You won’t fall. But if you stumble and look, you must bow down with your head and your heart,” Demnig said.

But now Germany’s Alternative for Germany (AfD) party is decrying stones as forcing people to remember the Holocaust.

“With their actions, the stumbling stone initiators impose a culture of remembrance on their fellow human beings, dictating to them how they should remember who and when,” AfD lawmaker Wolfgang Gedeon wrote in February. “Who gives these obtrusive moralists the right to do so?”

Gedeon launched a failed bid to have the Stolperstein in his region removed. But AfD is currently the largest opposition party in Germany, having won a surprising number of votes in the most recent election. A high-ranking member of the party recently praised the “achievements” of the Nazis.

In the meantime, Demnig is quietly adding more stones every day. He says that some people have told him that the stones are the only reason they feel comfortable returning to Germany after being forced out during the Holocaust.

“And yes, I am proud of that,” he said.

End quote

The far-right National Front party and the owner of multiple convictions for incitement to racist hatred against Jews was over his 2015 statement that the Holocaust was “a detail” of World War II. Downplaying or denying genocides is illegal in France. Le Pen must pay more than $30,000 in fines for the remark, Le Monde reported.

 

Separately, the Paris Correctional Tribunal last week acquitted Alain Soral, who also has multiple convictions for hate speech against Jews and Holocaust denial, of an indictment for his posting of a caricature suggesting that President Emmanuel Macron is being controlled by Jews.

The drawing shared online by Soral, a co-founder of the Anti-Zionist Party along with the anti-Semitic comedian Dieudonne M’bala M’bala, depicts Macron wearing a Nazi-like armband with a dollar sign and three well-known European Jews – the French economist Jacques Attali, entrepreneur Patrick Drahi and the British banking magnate Jacob Rothschild — in the background towering over the earth while flanked by an Israeli and American flag.

The National Bureau for Vigilance Against Anti-Semitism and the Union of Jewish Students in France, or UEJF, last year filed police complaints against a Socialist lawmaker, Gerard Filoche, for alleged incitement to racist hatred over his reposting of the caricature.

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