Scrapbookpages Blog

April 14, 2018

James Comey’s new tell-all book

Filed under: Trump — furtherglory @ 4:20 pm

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at http://thehill.com/policy/national-security/383114-comey-trump-feud-takes-vicious-turn

Begin quote from news article:

In the book, [Former FBI director James] Comey expresses regret for his explanation of the investigation into Clinton’s use of a private server for government business. Clinton and her aides have argued Comey’s decision to revive the probe days before the election contributed to her loss.

“I’m sorry that I couldn’t do a better job explaining to her [Hillary Clinton] and her supporters why I made the decisions I made,” he writes.

He also says his handling of the Clinton investigation was likely affected by his expectation that she would win the White House.

End quote

The news article continues with this quote:

Begin quote

The new book has reignited the feud between Comey and Trump that has raged for more than a year, since Comey first confirmed the existence of the investigation into Russian interference in the election and whether there was collusion between Trump’s campaign and Moscow.

Trump has gone on offense, labeling Comey an “untruthful slimeball” and a “leaker” deserving of prosecution.

Republicans, meanwhile, are mounting an all-out campaign against the former FBI director, attacking his credibility.

End quote

In my humble opinion, I believe that Hillary won the election. I went to bed on the night of the election, thinking that she had won, only to learn the next morning that Trump had somehow won.

 

Two thirds of millenials don’t know what Auschwitz is

Filed under: Auschwitz, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 1:00 pm

According to this news article, we are forgetting about the Holocaust: https://slate.com/human-interest/2018/04/the-nyt-says-were-forgetting-about-the-holocaust-but-history-suggests-otherwise.html

Begin quote

We’re forgetting about the Holocaust. Or so argues a survey by the Claims Conference, released Thursday and written up in the New York Times under the desolate headline “Holocaust Is Fading From Memory, Survey Finds.” Among the startling statistics: 11 percent of all U.S. adults, and 22 percent of millennials, are “unaware” or “not sure” of the Holocaust. And 31 percent of adults (and 41 percent of millennials) think that 2 million Jews, or fewer, had been killed. (The real number is 6 million.) Also, 41 percent of adults couldn’t identify Auschwitz as a concentration camp, a death/extermination camp, or a forced-labor camp.

The Claims Conference’s survey, and the Times’ write-up, presumes that our knowledge gaps are getting worse and will only become more dire as we move forward in time. The emphasis on millennials’ relative ignorance drives this point home. Because things today feel worse (see: creeping ambient fascism and anti-Semitism), this conclusion seems to make a kind of dark, intuitive sense. But how did people’s knowledge of the Holocaust in years past compare to our bad showing in 2018? And are we really, as the Times’ coverage implies, less committed to remembering the genocide than we were in years past, when we had more survivors on hand to testify to what they saw?

End quote

I have a whole section on my website about Auschwitz:

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/AuschwitzScrapbook/index.html