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April 23, 2018

New exhibit will open at the US Holocaust Memorial Museum

Filed under: Germany, Language — furtherglory @ 5:06 pm

The following quote is from a news article which you can read at https://www.npr.org/2018/04/23/604398292/as-american-awareness-fades-holocaust-museum-refreshes-the-story

Begin quote

A new exhibit that opens Monday at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum [in Washington, DC] aims to honor a founding mission.

Five years in the making, “Americans and the Holocaust” contextualizes attitudes in the U.S. during 1930s and ’40s persecution and mass murder of Jews in Europe.

Twenty-five years ago, when the building opened, noted Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel introduced the museum not as an answer to the horrors of genocide but to pose a glaring question: How could this happen?

End quote

How would Elie Wiesel know how this happened? He was hiding out in his home town, and few people knew where he was.

The article continues with this quote:

Begin quote

In gauging these attitudes, visitors can wade through chronological checkpoints of public opinion polling during the era. For example, results consistently show that at least two-thirds of Americans disapproved of Nazi treatment of Jews but simultaneously were not willing to let in more exiles. The lone fact that Gallup was polling these kinds of questions suggests the vein of the American consciousness.

An interactive map archiving crowd-sourced newspaper coverage shows that if Americans were reading news at the time, much of it was from a wire service with headlines varying state by state. “You didn’t have to be a New Yorker or in D.C. to be reading stories about Nazis’ persecution of Jews,” Greene says.

End quote

I was a child when all of this was going on, and I was reading the daily morning newspaper from St. Louis. So I knew about the “Nazi persecution of Jews”. I was only a child, but I believed that the Jews deserved this persecution because the Jews were bad people. That is what most people believed back then.

The American responses “must and will be explored thoroughly and honestly,” Wiesel said in a 1979 address before President Jimmy Carter, who had tasked a commission, chaired by Wiesel, with recommending an appropriate memorial for the 6 million lives lost.

The historical evidence in the museum collection in Washington, D.C., detailing what America knew and when, dispels myths that its actors didn’t have enough information about the magnitude of Nazi Germany’s campaign to intervene, says Daniel Greene, a historian and the curator of the exhibit.

1 Comment »

  1. Furtherglory wrote: “The American responses “must and will be explored thoroughly and honestly,” Wiesel said in a 1979 address before President Jimmy Carter, who had tasked a commission, chaired by Wiesel, with recommending an appropriate memorial for the 6 million lives lost.”

    The missing parts of the timetable to launch the Zionist propaganda campaign intended to make Holocaustianity the new religion of the Gentiles (especially the Gentiles of America) and unconditional support for Israel the only decent option:

    “The main [Zionist] battlefield now is the theater of opinion in the United States.”
    – [Zionist leader & 6th President of Israel] Chaim Herzog (who was there when the US Holocaust museum was dedicated), 1975.

    Joseph Cohen’s staged “Nazi” marches, clashes and legal battle (1977-1978):


    NBC, April 1978

    November 1, 1978: U.S. President Jimmy Carter establishes the President’s Commission on the Holocaust, chaired by Zionist-Irgun propagandist Elie Wiesel, “to investigate the creation and maintenance of a memorial to victims of the Holocaust.”

    Comment by hermie — April 24, 2018 @ 8:03 am


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