Scrapbookpages Blog

April 24, 2018

the Holocaust continues to fade from public consciousness

Filed under: Auschwitz, Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 7:41 pm

My blog post today is a comment on a news article which you can read in full at

https://wamu.org/story/18/04/24/will-holocaust-museum-look-like-without-survivors/

Begin quote from news article:

Despite the Holocaust museum’s many successes, the Holocaust continues to fade from public consciousness. A recent survey found that 66 percent of millennials do not know that Auschwitz was a concentration camp. Eighty percent of Americans have not visited a museum about the Holocaust.

So, Bloomfield said, “keeping the lessons of the Holocaust relevant, and reaching a global audience, are two of our biggest challenges going forward.” The museum plans to expand its collections, translate its website into more languages (it’s currently available in 16), launch new programs to study modern-day genocides, and present special exhibitions in more countries around the world.

End quote from news article

A good place to start learning about the Holocaust would be my website. Start by reading this page of my website: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/AuschwitzScrapbook/History/Articles/Birkenau01.html

My early morning photo of the entrance into the main Auschwitz camp before the tourists started arriving. I had to sneak into the camp before the gates were open to get the photo above in 1998.

GatehouseCover.jpg

The gate into the Auschwitz=Birkenau camp

The following quote is also from the news article:

Begin quote

Despite the [Holocaust] museum’s many successes, the Holocaust continues to fade from public consciousness. A recent survey found that 66 percent of millennials do not know that Auschwitz was a concentration camp. Eighty percent of Americans have not visited a museum about the Holocaust.

So, Bloomfield said, “keeping the lessons of the Holocaust relevant, and reaching a global audience, are two of our biggest challenges going forward.” The museum plans to expand its collections, translate its website into more languages (it’s currently available in 16), launch new programs to study modern-day genocides, and present special exhibitions in more countries around the world.

End quote