Scrapbookpages Blog

November 20, 2017

Austria accepted it’s Holocaust guilt

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 1:20 pm

You can read about how Austria has accepted it’s Holocaust guilt in this news article:

https://azjewishpost.com/2017/austria-accepted-its-holocaust-guilt-so-why-is-its-far-right-on-the-rise/

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

VIENNA (JTA) — When it comes to the Holocaust, Austria has made a lot of progress assuming responsibility.

In recent years, Austrian officials have consistently acknowledged their country’s support of Adolf Hitler, an Austria native, and his war of annihilation against Jews. In the early 2000s, the government dropped the claim that the country was mostly a victim of German Nazism, citing “the special responsibility imposed on Austria by its recent history.” Instead, teaching about the Holocaust has become mandatory, with visits to former death camps and teacher training in Israel.

Tina Walzer speaking at the inauguration of an artwork about the Holocaust at Vienna’s Herminnengasse subway station, Oct. 19, 2017. (Cnaan Liphshiz)

The government has paid nearly $1 billion since 2005 in compensation to Holocaust victims, and since 2012, Holocaust memorial projects have popped up at an unprecedented rate.

End quote

Will the Germans and the Austrians never learn? They can never be forgiven for putting Jews into camps, no matter what they do.

The Jews believe that they are God’s Chosen People and that they can lie, cheat and steal as much as they want to.

On my scrapbookpages.com website, you can read about the Mauthausen camp where Austrian Jews were sent.

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/Gas%20Chamber/index.html

November 19, 2017

The story of Bergen-Belsen

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 10:10 am

Years ago, I wanted to visit Bergen-Belsen, so I called a cab and said to the driver: “take me to Bergen-Belsen”. He said “which one — Bergen or Belsen”. I was stumped. I didn’t know that Bergen and Belsen were two different places.

All of this came back to me today, when I read this news article: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-sydney/holocaust-survivor-olga-horek-shares-story-of-liberation-as-jewish-museum-celebrates-25-years/news-story/61a9cf16d86a4cec72ba71bdb3530694

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

When Olga Horak was liberated from the Holocaust camp Bergen-Belsen in 1945 she had lost her whole family. She was 16 years old, had typhus, weighed 29kg and was carrying a blanket.

The blanket was made by her fellow death camp prisoners, who had been forced to weave their own hair with wool to make a warm covering for their Nazi wardens.

When the camp was liberated by British and Canadian forces, the Nazis fled, leaving behind a decimated population of Jews from all over Europe and importantly for Horak, the blanket.

End quote

Olga Horak is shown in the photo below

For Mrs. Horak, who survived five death camps, the blanket and the museum serve as a powerful reminder: we must never forget.

[My comment: How does one survive 5 death camps? Are Jews that hard to kill?]

“I feel compelled to talk about it, to teach the younger generation in order never to forget what happened,” Mrs Horak said.

“This is history, it cannot be erased and … as long as we can talk, we do ask the people who are willing to listen to us to listen,” she said.

Founded by the late John Saunders AO and members of the Australian Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors and Descendants in 1992, the museum has grown over the past 25 years to become an integral part of the cultural life of Sydney and a second home to many Holocaust survivors.

End quote

November 16, 2017

Don’t rock the Juke box — I wanna hear me some Jones

Filed under: Music — furtherglory @ 8:16 am

There was a time, long ago, in America when everyone knew who country singer George Jones was. On a Saturday night, half the people in America were sitting a few feet away from their radio, as they listened to George Jones sing.

The following information is from Wikipedia:

George Glenn Jones (September 12, 1931 – April 26, 2013) was an American musician, singer and songwriter. He achieved international fame for his long list of hit records, including his best known song “He Stopped Loving Her Today“, as well as his distinctive voice and phrasing. For the last twenty years of his life, Jones was frequently referred to as the greatest living country singer.[1][2] Country music scholar Bill C. Malone writes, “For the two or three minutes consumed by a song, Jones immerses himself so completely in its lyrics, and in the mood it conveys, that the listener can scarcely avoid becoming similarly involved.” Waylon Jennings expressed a similar opinion in his song “It’s Alright”: “If we all could sound like we wanted to, we’d all sound like George Jones.” The shape of his nose and facial features earned Jones the nickname “The Possum.”[3]

Born in Texas, Jones first heard country music when he was seven and was given a guitar at the age of nine. He married his first wife, Dorothy Bonvillion, in 1950, and was divorced in 1951. He served in the United States Marine Corps and was discharged in 1953. He married Shirley Ann Corley in 1954. In 1959, Jones recorded “White Lightning,” written by J. P. Richardson, which launched his career as a singer. His second marriage ended in divorce in 1968; he married fellow country music singer Tammy Wynette a year later. Many years of alcoholism caused his health to deteriorate severely and led to his missing many performances, earning him the nickname “No Show Jones.”[4] After his divorce from Wynette in 1975, Jones married his fourth wife, Nancy Sepulvado, in 1983 and became mostly sober. Jones died in 2013, aged 81, from hypoxic respiratory failure. During his career, Jones had more than 150 hits, both as a solo artist and in duets with other artists.

End quote from Wikipedia

November 15, 2017

Two German men in their 90ies charged with killing Jews at Stutthof

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 2:39 pm

You can read about the German men, charged with crimes at Stutthof, in the news at

https://www.timesofisrael.com/germany-charges-ex-nazi-camp-guards-over-hundreds-of-deaths/

Many years ago, I wrote the following about the Nazi camp called Stutthof on my website:

Begin quote from my scrapbookpages.com website:

Some of the Jews who were selected for slave labor were sent to the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria and its sub-camps where they worked in German aircraft factories.

Others were sent to the Stutthof camp near Danzig, according to Martin Gilbert, who wrote the following in his book entitled “Holocaust”:

Begin quote from Martin Gilbert:

On June 17 Veesenmayer telegraphed to Berlin that 340,142 Hungarian Jews had now been deported. A few were relatively fortunate to be selected for the barracks, or even moved out altogether to factories and camps in Germany. On June 19 some 500 Jews, and on June 22 a thousand, were sent to work in factories in the Munich area. […] Ten days later, the first Jews, 2500 women, were deported from Birkenau to Stutthof concentration camp. From Stutthof, they were sent to several hundred factories in the Baltic region. But most Jews sent to Birkenau continued to be gassed.

End quote

The above quote seems to indicate that Stutthof was not a place where Jews were sent to be killed.

“Erika” Afrikaans

Filed under: Language, Music, World War II — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 11:27 am

 

I blogged about another rendition of this song which you can view here:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/07/19/auf-der-heide-bluht-ein-kleines-blumelein/

I like this new version of a classic German marching song.

Rommel was noted for being a very handsome man, as shown in the photo below:

Erwin_Rommel.jpg

Great footage of Rommel in this rendition.

Below are the lyrics if you would like to sing along!  You can also read about this song on Wikipedia by following the link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erika_(song)

Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Heiß von hunderttausend kleinen Bienelein
wird umschwärmt Erika
denn ihr Herz ist voller Süßigkeit,
zarter Duft entströmt dem Blütenkleid.
Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.

On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.
Eagerly a hundred thousand little bees,
swarm around Erika.
For her heart is full of sweetness,
a tender scent escapes her blossom-gown.
On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.

In der Heimat wohnt ein kleines Mägdelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Dieses Mädel ist mein treues Schätzelein
und mein Glück, Erika.
Wenn das Heidekraut rot-lila blüht,
singe ich zum Gruß ihr dieses Lied.
Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.

Back at home, there lives a little maiden
and she’s called Erika.
That girl is my faithful little darling
and my joy, Erika!
When the heather blooms in a reddish purple,
I sing her this song in greeting.
On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.

In mein’m Kämmerlein blüht auch ein Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Schon beim Morgengrau’n sowie beim Dämmerschein
schaut’s mich an, Erika.
Und dann ist es mir, als spräch’ es laut:
“Denkst du auch an deine kleine Braut?”
In der Heimat weint um dich ein Mägdelein
und das heißt: Erika.

In my room, there also blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.
Already In the grey of dawn, as it does at dusk,
It looks at me, Erika!
And then it’s to me as if it’s saying aloud:
“Are you thinking of your fiancée?”
Back at home, a maiden weeps for you
and she’s called Erika.

The stairs of death at Mauthausen

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 10:50 am

My photo of the famous stairs of death at Mauthausen

The first thing that I do every morning, when I turn on my computer, is to check to see what the readers of my blog are reading now.

This morning I learned that my readers are mainly interested in the former Nazi concentration camp at Mauthausen.

You can read about Mauthausen on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/Quarry/StairsOfDeath01.html

Mauthausen is famous for the “stairs of death” which are shown in my photo above.

November 13, 2017

The Sobibor camp is back in the news

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 11:29 am

You can read about the Nazi camp at Sobibor in this recent news article: http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/karolina-cohn-ceremony-holocaust-1.4400056

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

More than two dozen relatives from around the world met Monday for the first time at a memorial ceremony for Karolina Cohn, a Jewish girl from Frankfurt who perished in the Holocaust more than 70 years ago.

Four little brass plaques for Karolina, her sister and parents were laid in front of the Frankfurt location where the family lived before they were deported on Nov. 11, 1941, when Karolina was 12.

“It’s pretty remarkable, that this little girl brought together this broken-up, fragmented family,” said Mandy Eisemann, a relative from the United States, who took part in the ceremony and afterward laid pink roses on the shiny plaques known as Stolpersteine, or stumbling stones.

 

A replica of Carolyn Kohn’s pendant

The story of Karolina’s life and death had been all but erased by the Nazis, until archeologists last year unearthed a silver pendant engraved with her birthdate and birthplace at the grounds of the former Sobibor death camp in eastern Poland.

With the help of Nazi deportation lists, researchers identified Karolina as the owner of the amulet. It’s almost identical to one belonging to famous Jewish diarist Anne Frank, though it’s not clear if the two girls knew each other. Both were born in Frankfurt in 1929.

End quote

Sobibor is one of the few Nazi camps that I have never visited. I was told that it was dangerous to go there. There were no tours of this camp that I could take. The camp is located way out in the boondocks, and I was told that there were murderers and thieves ready to rob and rape tourists who dared to go there alone.

In spite of this, I have a whole section about Sobibor on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Poland/Sobibor/index.html

The following quote is also from an external link from my web site:

https://www.thoughtco.com/sobibor-death-camp-1779674

Begin quote

Sobibor was the second of three death camps to be established as part of Aktion Reinhard (the other two were Belzec and Treblinka). The location of this death camp was a small village called Sobibor, in the Lublin district of eastern Poland, chosen because of its general isolation as well as its proximity to a railway. Construction on the camp began in March 1942, overseen by SS Obersturmführer Richard Thomalla.

Since construction was behind schedule by early April 1942, Thomalla was replaced by SS Obersturmführer Franz Stangl – a veteran of the Nazi euthanasia program. Stangl remained commandant of Sobibor from April until August 1942, when he was transferred to Treblinka (where he became commandant) and replaced by SS Obersturmführer Franz Reichleitner.

The staff of the Sobibor death camp consisted of approximately 20 SS men and 100 Ukrainian guards.

By mid-April 1942, the gas chambers were ready and a test using 250 Jews from the Krychow labor camp proved them operational.

End quote
Sorry, but I don’t believe that there were gas chambers at Sobibor. I don’t believe that there were any gas chambers, used by the Nazis. I am one of the few people who has ever seen a real gas chamber — the one in Jefferson City, Missouri, so I know what a gas chamber is supposed to look like.

 

November 11, 2017

Holocaust survivor Steve Ross is back in the news

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 11:00 am

You can read about Holocaust survivor Steve Ross in this recent news article: http://www.wbur.org/radioboston/2017/11/09/holocaust-steve-ross

Begin quote from news article:

Steve Ross was just 9 years old when he was imprisoned in a Nazi concentration camp.

Over the next five years, he was starved, beaten, experimented on, forced into labor, and terrorized at 10 different death camps. He escaped death by hiding in human waste in an outhouse and by holding onto the axle of a train as it went to another death camp.

On April 29, 1945, American soldiers liberated Dachau. Some 30,000 Holocaust survivors were freed. Ross was among them. As he walked away from the camp, he came upon a U.S. army lieutenant, sitting on a tank, eating food. What happened next transformed Ross’ life.

“After I was rescued from hell, in the valley of death, I came upon a soldier on a tank that showed me compassion for the first time, concern, and took me back to God to civilization and mankind,” Ross often tells people. “He gave me his food, he puts his arm around me, and he he gave me a flag.”

That encounter also set Ross on a path that eventually lead to Dorchester, and his work with at-risk youth in Boston, trying to ensure that such evil was never forgotten.

His story is told in a new documentary, “Etched in Glass: The Legacy of Steve Ross,” which premiers Friday at Coolidge Corner Theatre.

End quote from news article

I wrote about Steve Ross on my scrapbookpages.com website several years ago.

The following information is from my website:

Steve Ross is allegedly the boy on the far left in the photo above

The young boy on the far left in the photograph above is Stephen Ross, a 14-year-old Jewish orphan from Poland, who said that he had survived 10 different concentration camps in 5 years before he was liberated at Dachau by American soldiers. Standing next to Steve Ross is Juda Kukieda, the son of Mordcha Mendel and Ruchla Sta.

According to the book “Dachau 29 April 1945, the Rainbow Liberation Memoirs,” edited by Sam Dann, Stephen Ross (real name Szmulek Rozental) was one of the lucky few who was rescued in the nick of time when Dachau was liberated. Ross was interviewed for the book and according to his own story, he was one of the 1,800 prisoners who were crowded into one quarantine barrack, which was designed to hold only about a hundred prisoners.

Ross said that the prisoners in the quarantine barrack had not been fed for two weeks before the Seventh Army arrived. Food was scarce, and according to Ross, the prisoners were fed only occasionally when they were given “a biscuit, hard as a rock and covered with mold.”

From the quarantine block, Ross said that 80 to 100 prisoners a day were carried out and put on the pile of dead bodies near the barbed wire fence, from where they were taken to the crematory.

According to Ross, the quarantine block was where the German SS Doctors Sigmund Rascher and Klaus Schilling selected prisoners for their ghastly experiments. The doctors “removed thirty to forty prisoners on a daily basis for experiments” according to Ross.

Ross said that he “had been isolated in quarantine for experiments since 1944.” On the day of liberation, Ross made his way to the main gate, although he “was very weak and hardly able to walk.” With the help of his brother, who was also in the camp, Ross made it to the front of the crowd and was included in one of the most famous photographs of the liberation, shown at the top of this page.

After the liberation of Dachau, Ross had to stay in the camp until the typhus epidemic was brought under control. When he was released, he made his way to Munich where he was hospitalized for 6 months and treated for tuberculosis. He was then sent to a Displaced Persons camp for orphans at a former forced labor camp in Landsberg am Lech, near Munich. Finally, he was brought to America where he was able to recover his health.

Stephen Ross is the founder of The New England Holocaust Memorial in Boston.

 

November 10, 2017

Young students can learn about the Holocaust by playing video games

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 1:31 pm

You can read all about it in this news article: http://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-arts-and-culture/249092/call-of-duty-and-the-holocaust

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

Released last week, the game, a first-person shooter set in Europe’s killing fields, goes to great lengths to give players the feeling that they’re experiencing a slightly quicker-paced interactive version of a Ken Burns documentary. From D-Day to the Battle of the Bulge, a small band of brothers, American soldiers all, bond as they shoot Nazis by the dozens, making for a game that prides itself as much on its character development and attention to detail as it does its smooth mechanics and great graphics.

Which leaves us, alas, with the question of the Holocaust.

As a serious-minded game, Call of Duty: WWII cannot afford to skip the question of Nazi atrocities. Previous games, although not too many, have tackled the same subject, usually making the horror more palatable by adding fantastical elements to the plot. Cruelty, as titles like 2014’s Wolfenstein: The New Order proved, is easier to stomach when perpetrated by Nazi robots that remind you with every overwrought metallic movement that you’re only playing a silly game. The new Call of Duty is made of sturdier stuff, and as it heads to its conclusion, it enters a concentration camp, determined to keep the same somber and realistic tone it has sustained from the start.

End quote

I wrote about Auschwitz on my website BEFORE I became a Holocaust denier, which means that my website is kosher, and completely devoid of Holocaust denial.

You can read the kosher version of the Holocaust on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/AuschwitzScrapbook/Tour/Auschwitz1/Auschwitz02.html

It was only after I began visiting the Holocaust sites that I became a Holocaust denier. One of the reasons that I became a denier is that I had actually seen a gas chamber in Jefferson City, Missouri, when I was 11 years old, so I knew what a gas chamber was supposed to look like.

I knew that a gas chamber could not have a door with a glass window in it, which could easily be broken by the victims who were being gassed.

Gas pellets were allegedly put into Dachau gas chamber through this opening

The news article continues with this quote:

Begin quote

What if Call of Duty had allowed us, instead of shooting mindlessly at every German soldier we see, to capture a few of the concentration camp’s guards and then decide whether they deserved fair treatment as prisoners of war or brisk and violent retribution for their hideous crimes? And what if the game took just a bit more of a risk and infused its narrative with, say, interviews with witnesses and survivors? Another stellar indie game, recently released, does just that: Called Attentat 1942, it looks at the Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia by weaving together archival footage, testimonies from civilians who lived under German occupation, interactive comics, and other innovative forms that make gameplay not only entertaining but edifying.

In video games, then, like in cinema, the future seems bittersweet, with a glut of big and loud titles that numb the eye, the mind, and the soul interspersed with a few daring exceptions that help us ponder the question great art has always addressed, which is: What does it mean to be human?

End quote

 

November 9, 2017

The Zyklon induction holes on the roof of Auschwitz-Birkenau Crematory II

Filed under: Auschwitz, Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 4:58 pm

You can read about the roof at Auschwitz, which has induction holes for Zyklon-B gas at

http://www.ihr.org/jhr/v20/v20n5p33_Renk.html

The following quote is from the link above:

What has been described as “the most extensive judicial examination of the Holocaust period since the [1961] Adolf Eichmann trial in Israel,” David Irving’s libel action against Deborah Lipstadt, generated a wealth of fresh research and renewed the debate over gassing at Auschwitz during the Second World War. [See note 1] No aspect of the Auschwitz gassing claim was more contested at that trial than the evidence for and against four holes in the roof of an underground room of crematorium II at Auschwitz-Birkenau. The jousts over this evidence between Irving and the defense expert on Auschwitz architecture, Professor Robert Jan van Pelt, provided some of the trial’s most heated exchanges.

Trivial as the question of openings in a roof might seem, both sides of the debate, revisionists and “exterminationists,” are agreed that such holes would have been necessary for the introduction of the alleged killing agent, the cyanide-based pesticide Zyklon B. The holes are thus central to the accusation that victims were murdered by gas in a cellar of Crematorium (crematory facility or Krema) II in 1943 and 1944. Indeed, in the eyes of Professor van Pelt, considered the historical establishment’s leading expert on the design and function of the Auschwitz crematoria: “Crematorium II is the most lethal building of Auschwitz. In the 2,500 square feet of this one room, more people lost their lives than any other place on this planet. 500,000 people were killed. If you would draw a map of human suffering, if you created a geography of atrocity, this would be the absolute center.” [See note 2]

Revisionist investigators, mindful of Arthur Butz’s opinion that Auschwitz “is the key to the whole story” of the mass gassing allegation, have long focused on that camp. [See note 3] In doing so, some revisionists have called attention to the absence of evidence for the necessary holes in the roof of the alleged gas chamber of Auschwitz’s Crematorium II. In the late 1970s, when Auschwitz was administered by Poland’s Communist government, the Swede Ditlieb Felderer took hundreds of photographs of the remains of the Auschwitz crematoria ruins, and noted the seeming absence of holes for introducing Zyklon B, as described in eyewitness testimony. Fred Leuchter and Germar Rudolf conducted more exacting forensic examinations of the ruins in the late 1980s and early 1990s, drawing the same conclusion. The eminent French revisionist Professor Robert Faurisson summed up the problem of the holes in 1993 with a simple slogan, “No holes, no Holocaust.”

End quote

My 1998 photo of holes on the roof

In 1998, I climbed up on the roof of the Auschwitz gas chamber, as my tour guide screamed at me: “You can’t go up there.” She should have said ” You MAY NOT go up there!” I could climb up on the roof, so I did.

The photo below is another view, taken from the roof of the gas chamber. The yellow building on the left is the former SS hospital. Survivors who worked in the hospital testified that they looked out the windows and observed SS men pouring Zyklon-B gas pellets through the holes on the roof.

The building across the street was a hospital for wounded German soldiers

Would the Germans at Auschwitz have put a gas chamber across the street from a hospital where German soldiers lay dying? I don’t think so!

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