Scrapbookpages Blog

February 25, 2017

Holocaust survivor says Donald Trump is not the human being to be president

Filed under: Dachau, Holocaust, Trump, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 2:30 pm

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at https://collegian.com/2017/02/holocaust-survivor-shares-experience-in-auschwitz/

Begin quote

[Fanny] Starr is concerned that under the current presidential administration, she will become a victim again.

“I’m very much against this government, and I’m very scared I will become a victim again,” Starr said. “(President Donald Trump) is not the human being to be president.”

Starr says she continues to speak to counteract anti-Semitism present in the world today.

The following quote is from the news artical:

Begin quote

Fanny Starr said she lost her will to live when she entered the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp months before it was liberated by the British.

“I told my sister, ‘I don’t want to live. I don’t have nobody,’” Starr said upon entering Bergen-Belsen.

Starr said her sister, Rena Alter, grabbed her by the collar of her striped outfit.

“She grabbed me by my clothes, stood me up and said, ‘This is our life, no mom, no dad,’” Starr said.

fanny-starr-elliott-jerge2.jpg

Fanny Starr, this year’s featured speaker for Holocaust Awareness Week, shares her story about surviving internment in several Nazi concentration camps during World War II. (Elliott Jerge | Collegian)

Starr shared her experience as a Holocaust survivor in the Nazi concentration camps with over 1200 students Wednesday night for the 20th annual Holocaust Awareness Week. Rebecca Chapman, a freshman at East High School, and Alex Ingber, the Vice President of Students for Holocaust Awareness, asked Starr questions about the Holocaust.

Starr, born in 1922, was a teenager when her family was forced into the Lodz ghetto.

According to Starr, there was very little food, and people received food once a month if they were lucky.

Starr and her family were taken to Auschwitz in a train car of nearly 60 people after the [Lodz] ghetto was liquidated in 1944.

Starr remembers Auschwitz as a horrid place where the Jewish people were stripped of their clothes, and their identities were reduced to numbers. She remembers seeing the writing “Arbei Macht Frei” and Dr. Josef Mengele in his black uniform as she got off the train.

Starr remembers how [Dr.] Mengele assessed each Jew who got off the train and decided who looked healthy enough to work or who would be sent to the gas chambers.

“My youngest sister, (as) we were standing in the line to see him, … pinched my cheeks, and I pinched her cheeks to look (healthy),” Starr said.

Starr remembers laying in a field in Auschwitz, looking up at the night sky as bodies burned in the ovens.

“The sky was red, and the smell was horrid,” Starr said. “You could smell the body smell and the hair smell. We could see the ashes coming down like snow.”

Starr lost her mother and two siblings to the gas chambers in Auschwitz. Her father starved in Dachau.

She said she and her sister came to America in 1951. Starr said they visited a cemetery to say their goodbyes to family members even though their family’s bodies “were just ashes.”

End quote

What can I say about this? She is a typical “liar, liar, pants on fire” Jewish Holocaust survivor.

churches not too far away from every death camp

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 6:40 am

The title of my blog post today is a quote from this news article:

https://www.algemeiner.com/2017/02/24/70-years-later-still-no-answers-on-the-holocaust/

Stone path at Treblinka

Photo of stone path at Treblinka is included with news article

My photo of the same path at Treblinka

My photo of same path at Treblinka

A photo of the stone path at Treblinka is included in the news article. The Jews didn’t walk on this path; it was added years later as art work.

Begin quote from news article:

I’ve listened to the stories of Holocaust survivors, studied the history, and read many books about what happened 70 years ago. But for me, the learning never stops. [It never stops for me either]

[…]

So last October, I went to Eastern Europe. I flew to Berlin and took a train up to the Ravensbruck concentration camp, about an hour north of the city. Ravensbruck was the main death camp for women and girls. You may know the name Corrie Ten Boom. She was a Dutch Christian who hid many Jews in her family’s house, but was discovered and sent to Ravensbruck along with her sister. Corrie later watched as her sister was murdered and thrown into the ovens. [Why wasn’t Corrie murdered?]

At the [Treblinka] death camp, I stood where the first German women were trained to be members of the SS. I walked on weather-beaten stones where, years ago, ashes had been thrown. Underneath the stones, the ashes are still there — crying out for redemption. [No the stones were added much later; there are no ashes of Jews under these stones.]

I looked off into the distance, over the small lake, and saw a church steeple. In fact, I saw churches not too far away from every death camp I visited. The people in those churches knew what was going on.

Everywhere I went, it was grey, cold and drizzly. I traveled to the Ravensbruck, Dachau, Terezin, Auschwitz-Birkenau, Chelmno, Lodz, Treblinka, Plazkow and Majdanek death camps.[So did I.]

I also found my way to the small village of Jedwabne in Poland, which had a population of 1,200 before the War; half of these people were Jews.

On July 10, 1941, this village was the site of incomprehensible horror. The Poles forced rabbis to carry the Torah, marching and singing, as they brutally beat the Jews and drove them into a barn. They tied up children, stabbed live babies with pitchforks and threw them screaming into the barn. Then the Poles doused it with kerosene, and burned every Jew alive.

End quote from news article

What I found to be very strange about this woman’s story is that she apparently never questioned why these perpetrators of such violence had such hatred for the Jews. Why were these poor innocent Jews hated so much? Something wrong!

Could it be that the non-Jews in these places were so fed up with the Jews, who were lying, cheating and stealing, that they couldn’t take it any more? And that’s why these Jews were so brutally killed?

I have been to Germany many times, and I lived there for 20 months when my husband was stationed there with the US Army. I have always found that the German people do not get upset easily. They remain calm and do not kill people for no reason.

 

February 24, 2017

Sachsenhausen camp gets no respect

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — furtherglory @ 8:38 am

This morning, I read a news article about tourists taking selfies at the memorial site at the former Sachsenhausen concentration camp.

http://www.jweekly.com/2017/02/23/selfies-and-smiles-at-holocaust-sites-tourists-on-camera/

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

Just what constitutes appropriate behavior at a Holocaust memorial site has been a hot topic recently. Last month, the Israeli-German writer and satirist Shahak Shapira reignited the public debate about “Holocaust tourism” with a website “shaming” tourists who appear in flippant selfies taken at the Holocaust memorial in Berlin. Shapira’s site, titled Yolocaust, superimposed smiling tourists with gruesome images from the Holocaust, such as piles of corpses.

End quote

Tourists posing for photo at Sachsenhausen memorial site

Tourists posing for photo at Sachsenhausen memorial site

My photo of the gate into the Sachsenhausen memorial site is shown below.

My photo of the Sachsenhausen entrance

My photo of the Sachsenhausen entrance

My photo of trees at the end of the entrance road

My photo of trees at the end of the entrance road

How did I get a photo of the Sachsenhausen gate with no tourists in the picture?

Simple — I was the only person there. I walked around for a couple of hours, and saw no one else. Most people go with a tour group, but I was there all alone.

The original Sachsenhausen concentration camp was designed by 29-year-old architect SS-Untersturmführer Bernhard Kuiper in the shape of an isoceles triangle, or pyramid, with the apex of the triangle at the rear of the camp and the two equal sides of the triangle forming the side boundaries of the camp. The gate house was located at the base of the triangle in such a way that the machine guns in the guard tower on the top of the building could cover the whole camp.

According to Rudolf Höss, who was an adjutant at Sachsenhausen before he became the first Commandant of Auschwitz, “Arbeit Macht Frei” means that works liberates one in the spiritual sense. Höss was himself a prisoner at one time and he complained about having to sit all alone in a prison cell without having any work to occupy his time.

When Höss was sent to Auschwitz, as the Commandant of the camp, he had this same slogan put over the entrance gate into the Auschwitz main camp, which was called Auschwitz I.

When the Sachsenhausen camp was later turned into a Communist prison for German citizens, the Arbeit Macht Frei sign was removed and the prisoners did not work.

Immediately in front of the Sachsenhausen gate house is the roll call area (Appellplatz), which is shown in the center of my first photograph above.

According to a museum pamphlet, the SS constructed a shoe testing track here in 1940 where prisoners of the penal commando had to test the soles of army boots by marching for days. The civilian director of the shoe-testing operation was Ernst Brennscheidt, who was sentenced to 15 years of forced labor after he was convicted of Crimes against Humanity by a Soviet Union Military Tribunal in October 1947.

 

 

 

February 23, 2017

The Jews who were forced to work in Nazi death factories

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 8:57 am
Survivors of Auschwitz-Birkenau with Russian liberator

Survivors of Auschwitz-Birkenau with Russian soldier who helped to liberate the camp

A photo that is very similar to the one above is shown in a news article about the Sonderkommando Jews who were forced to help the Nazis, in the killing of the Jews at Auschwitz-Birkenau.

The following quote is from the news article which you can read in full at http://www.haaretz.com/world-news/europe/.premium-1.773405

Begin quote from news article:

The members of the Sonderkommando in Auschwitz worked in the gas chambers. They were posted to the undressing rooms, where the victims had to disrobe; they were responsible for the removal of the bodies after the murder; for removing valuables from the bodies; for burning the bodies; for dealing with the body parts that did not burn completely; and finally they carried the ashes to the river and dumped them in the water.

As Shaul Chazan, one of the Sonderkommando survivors, told me: At 9:30, a transport of 3,500 people would arrive, and four hours later, not a trace of them remained – as though they had never existed. [Chazan’s testimony appears in Greif’s “We Wept Without Tears”; Yale University Press, 2005.] The Sonderkommando carried out all those tasks, but it’s important for me to emphasize that they never took part in the work of murder itself. They did not murder anyone. Only the Germans threw the deadly gas into the chambers.

End quote from news article

I wrote about the Sonderkommando Jews on my scrapbookpages.com website BEFORE I became a Holocaust denier.

Begin quote from my scrapbookpages.com website:

One of the survivors of Auschwitz was Samuel Pisar, who was first sent, at the age of 13, to the Majdanek death camp, in August 1943, when the Bialystok ghetto in Poland was liquidated. A few months later, he was transferred to Auschwitz-Birkenau where he was put to work.

In an article in the Washington Post, published on January 23, 2005, Samuel Pisar wrote the following about his experience at Birkenau:

My labor commando was assigned to remove garbage from a ramp near the Crematoria. From there I observed the peak of human extermination and heard the blood-curdling cries of innocents as they were herded into the gas chambers. Once the doors were locked, they had only three minutes to live, yet they found enough strength to dig their fingernails into the walls and scratch in the words “Never Forget.”

One of the Auschwitz-Birkenau prisoners, who loaded the corpses of the murdered Jews into the Crematoria ovens after they were killed in the gas chambers with Zyklon-B, was Schlomo Venezia who described his work in an interview with Adam L. Freeman, a reporter with the Bloomberg News, on December 17, 2007.

According to Freeman’s article, posted on the web site http://www.bloomberg.com, Schlomo worked for eight months at Birkenau in 1944, “…12 hours a day, seven days a week, cadaver after cadaver until it became a mechanical task, like feeding a heating furnace with cords of wood.”

Schlomo Venezia wrote a memoir entitled “Sonderkommando Auschwitz,” which was originally published in French; a new Italian version was published in 2007.

The following quote about Schlomo’s story is from Adam L. Freeman’s article in the Bloomberg News on December 17, 2007:

Begin quote from news article:

He [Schlomo] recalls, for example, the day he met his father’s emaciated cousin in an undressing room at the gas chambers. Venezia offered him the only solace possible, he writes — some sardines and a lie that the Zyklon B would kill him quickly.

“It was just terrible to have to lie, but there was no way around it,” Venezia explains. “I tried in some way to make the horrible situation easier.”

The Sonderkommandos, as the prisoners working at the gas chambers were known, were privy to how the Nazis went about their butchery. Determined to keep their methods secret, the Nazis killed members of these units at regular intervals, making Venezia’s memoir rare.

He was 20 years old at the time; he will turn 84 on Dec. 29. His own mother was murdered at the camp while he worked at the ovens — one of more than 1 million Jews killed there.

As we talk over a table of ties in his one-room shop near the Trevi Fountain, Venezia remains almost motionless. His Hungarian-born wife, Marika, tends to shoppers entering through the glass door. At one point, she places a box of coffee-filled chocolates between us.

The descendant of an old Jewish family from Spain and Italy, Venezia was born in the northern Greek city of Thessaloniki, where he grew up fatherless and poor, speaking Greek, Italian and Ladino, a Spanish-Jewish dialect.

Poverty sharpened his wits, he says. Working the black market in Nazi-occupied Greece, Venezia learned some German, which may have saved his life. In the camp, he escaped beatings by understanding when guards shouted out the number tattooed on his arm: 182727.

Cutting the hair off cadavers, pulling their gold teeth and dragging them to the furnaces became mechanical, Venezia says, because it was the only way to stay sane. The routine broke down only once, he recalls, when the prisoners were confronted with the lifeless body of a woman possessing “the absolute beauty of an ancient statue.”

She looked like “a woman in a painting,” Venezia says, pausing for a moment in reflection. “Like Mona Lisa.” Yet there was nothing to do but cremate her.

Another day, his unit found a live baby trying to suck its dead mother’s breast among a heap of corpses in a gas chamber. The prisoners watched without protest as a Nazi guard unloaded his pistol into the infant.

“There were so many terrible things that happened,” he says. “Every day it was something else.”

End quote

 

February 22, 2017

Karl Röder was forced by Nazi officials to forge the “Arbeit macht frei” slogan on the Dachau gate

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 5:41 pm
My photo of the gate into the Dachau camp

My photo of the gate into the Dachau camp

The title of this blog post comes from a line in a news article, which you can read in full at http://www.dw.com/en/stolen-arbeit-macht-frei-gate-returned-to-holocaust-memorial-in-dachau/a-37665320

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

The original wrought-iron gate carrying the infamous Nazi slogan “Arbeit macht frei” (“work sets you free”) was returned to Dachau from Norway on Wednesday.

It will be restored and publicly unveiled this April on the 72nd anniversary of the camp’s liberation. The gate will not be returned to its original location, but rather be displayed in the museum on the grounds of the former concentration camp near Munich in Bavaria that now serves as a memorial.

End quote

I have been to the former Dachau camp several times, beginning with my first visit in 1998.

The red brick road up to the Dachau gate

My photo of the red brick road up to the Dachau gatehouse

I have a section on my website about the Dachau gate: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/KZDachau/Gatehouse.html

The iron gate at the entrance through the Dachau gatehouse into the prison compound is shown in my photo at the top of this page.

The sign which reads “Arbeit Macht Frei” was removed soon after the Dachau camp was liberated, but it was reconstructed in 1965 at the same time that two barrack buildings were reconstructed for visitors. One of the reconstructed barracks can be seen on the left side of my photo at the top of this page.

The slogan “Arbeit Macht Frei” was allegedly coined by Propaganda Minister Josef Goebbels in an effort to convince the public that the Nazi concentration camps were merely work camps designed to politically rehabilitate Communists, Social Democrats and anarchists.

This slogan was first used over the gate of a “wild camp” in the city of Oranienburg which was set up in an abandoned brewery in March 1933 during the time that the first political prisoners were being held for an indefinite period without charges in a number of places in Germany.

In 1936, the Oranienburg camp was rebuilt as the Sachsenhausen camp. The Dachau camp was also rebuilt, starting in 1936. The gatehouse at Sachsenhausen also bears this inscription, but the third major German concentration camp, Buchenwald, has a sign on the gate that reads “Jedem das Seine,” which means To Each his Own.

Dachau and Sachsenhausen were both Class I camps for offenders, who were considered capable of being rehabilitated and who were eligible for possible release.

Rudolf Höss, who trained at Dachau and then served as an adjutant at Sachsenhausen before becoming the first Commandant at Auschwitz, used this motto over the gate into the main camp, Auschwitz I, which was classified as a Class I camp for political prisoners. Auschwitz II, also known as Birkenau, was not a Class I camp, so Birkenau did not have this slogan over the gatehouse.

Two other Nazi concentration camps which used the slogan “Arbeit Macht Frei” on their gate houses were Flossenbürg and Gross-Rosen. This slogan also appeared on a gate inside the Gestapo prison in the Small Fortress at Terezin, formerly known as Theresienstadt.

February 20, 2017

A Jewish visitor to Sachsenhausen completely misunderstands the history of the camp

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 2:44 pm
My photo of the sculpture at Sachsenhausen

My photo of the sculpture at Sachsenhausen

You can read, in this news article, about how a young Jewish woman was completely mislead about Sachsenhausen: http://jewishjournal.com/opinion/215357/burned-ovens-drowned-sea-rammed-vehicles-bombed-pieces-marched-death-world-want-jews-us-today/

I have a section on my website where you can read all about Sachsenhausen: https://www.scrapbookpages.com/Sachsenhausen/index.html

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

I walked into a concentration camp in Germany – and I walked out. A Jewish woman leaving a Nazi camp defies the odds and realities of millions of human beings.

“If you are done with the alt-right you filthy kike, then fuck off to Israel or just get into the oven. Problem solved.” A man wrote me those words, which I read before coming face to face with the crematorium at a Nazi concentration camp in Germany, the very ovens where bodies of millions of Jews were incinerated.

I found myself unexpectedly terrorized, shaken to my core. Never did I imagine visiting a concentration camp. Despite being born to a Jewish mother, I had zero desire and felt no family connection to the Holocaust. But there I found myself in Sachsenhausen: standing trapped within barbed wire and walls, fighting the most intense bone chill of my life, losing hope in humanity and in myself.

On the heels of hearing a German parliamentarian negate that anti-Semitism is on the rise in Europe or worldwide, a cab driver affirm that Jews were responsible for 9/11, and a former neo-Nazi quote an Austrian military officer in saying his radical political beliefs would have been welcome had they won the war, I felt paralyzed – staring into the ovens in search of answers, of lessons, of direction.

End quote

You can read about Sachsenhausen on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Sachsenhausen/ConcentrationCamp/GasChamber.html

The following quote is from my website:

Station Z was the nickname that the SS gave to the execution site at Sachsenhausen. Beginning in the fall of 1939, Station Z was the site where prisoners who had been condemned to death in a Nazi court were executed by a firing squad.

According to the memoirs of Rudolf Höss, who was on the staff at Sachsenhausen for a time, anyone who was convicted of war-time sabotage or enemy activity against the state was sent to the nearest concentration camp for execution, and the first such execution after the war started in 1939 was carried out at Sachsenhausen when a Communist, who had refused to perform his assigned air raid duties in an aircraft factory, was shot.

Staton Z is also the location of an alleged gas chamber that was allegedly first put into operation in 1943, presumably to gas Russian POWs since there were no Jews in the camp at that time.

At a Military Tribunal conducted by the Soviet Union in October 1947, Camp Commandant Anton Kaindl confessed to the gassing of prisoners, on his own authority, at Sachsenhausen. This was an obvious lie.

The gas chamber and the execution site were both inside the Industrial Yard, where the factories were located; they were separated from the prison enclosure by a brick wall.

The name Station Z was intended to be a joke, according to the Memorial Site, because the entrance to the camp was through Building A, which was the gate house, and Station Z was the exit from the camp for those who had been executed.

End quote from my website

Vice president Mike Pence visits Dachau memorial site

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust, Trump, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 9:15 am
My photo of the back side of the monument at Dachau

My photo of the back side of International monument at Dachau, taken in a light rain

My photo of the monument

My photo shows another view of the Dachau International monument

You can read a news article here about Vice President Mike Pence and his recent visit to the Dachau memorial site: http://www.jta.org/2017/02/19/news-opinion/politics/mike-pence-visits-site-of-nazi-camp-dachau

The point of the article, cited above, is contained in this quote which is at the very end of the article:

Begin quote

The visit [to Dachau] comes after an outcry over the Trump Administration’s statement issued last month for international Holocaust Remembrance Day, which did not specifically mention Jews.

End quote

There is a law in Germany that any official visitor must first go to Dachau and place a wreath in honor of the Jews who were killed by the Germans. After all these years, the German must still be demonized and they must forever hang their heads in shame. That’s what happens when you kill God’s Chosen People.

There are now over one million Jews back in Germany and they are keeping an eye on the Germans, to make sure that they bow down to the Jews.

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

The Pences visited the International Memorial at the center of [the Dachau] camp, where they laid a wreath.  They also visited a Jewish memorial and a Catholic memorial on the grounds, and attended a service at the Church of Reconciliation, located on the camp grounds.

They also toured the barracks, a crematorium, and a gas chamber.

Naor described to Pence the work he did at the camp, and a typical meal, which he said was a slice of bread. “If it was a miracle that we survived, I don’t know” what it was, Naor said.

End quote

Maybe it was a huge chunck of bread and a bowl of soup that this prisoner was given for each meal, and that’s how he survived.

I wrote about Dachau on this previous blog post:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2015/04/14/how-many-prisoners-were-murdered-at-dachau/

The following quote is also from the news article:

Begin quote

Dachau was established in 1933, and served as the model for all other Nazi camps. Over 200,000 people from across Europe were imprisoned in Dachau and over 41,000 killed. U.S. soldiers liberated Dachau in April 1945.

End quote

That is old news. The number of prisoners who died at Dachau has been lowered considerably. I wrote about the number of prisoners that were killed at Dachau on this blog post:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2015/04/14/how-many-prisoners-were-murdered-at-dachau/

The point of all this is that, no matter how low the Germans bow down to the Jews, they can never be forgiven for Dachau, or any of the other camps where Jews were imprisoned.

February 19, 2017

World leaders are attending a conference in Munich

Filed under: Germany, Trump — furtherglory @ 9:41 am

You can read a news article about the on-going conference in Munich here: http://time.com/4674331/munich-conference-nato-europe-us-foreign-policy/

The following quote is from the last line in the article:

Begin quote

U.S. Sen. John McCain, an outspoken critic of Trump’s Russia policies, is among more than a dozen American representatives expected to attend as part of a U.S. congressional delegation.

End quote

When I attended Journalism school at the University of Missouri, back in the Dark Ages, we were taught that the most important part of the story should be mentioned in the headline. In this case, the headline should have said something about Donald Trump screwing up as usual.  Instead, the news article begins with this quote:

BERLIN (AP) — Top world leaders, diplomats and defense officials are getting their first opportunity to meet with members of the Trump administration amid concerns over the new president’s commitment to NATO and posture toward Russia.

Vice President Mike Pence, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly are leading the U.S. delegation to the Munich Security Conference opening Friday. The annual weekend gathering is known for providing an open and informal platform for allies — and adversaries — to meet in close quarters.

End quote

February 18, 2017

Has Germany given up “its effort to overcome past misdeeds by suppressing any vestige of nationalism?”

Filed under: Germany, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 9:57 am

The title of my blog post includes a quote from an article in a German newspaper. You can read the article in full at https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/17/world/europe/germany-far-right-politics-afd.html?_r=0

The following quote is from the newspaper article, cited above:

Begin quote

POTSDAM, Germany — As the far right rises across Europe, its ascent in Germany has seemed among the most alarming and puzzling.

For decades, Germany was thought to be inoculated against far-right politics by its history with Naziism and the Holocaust. But today, Germany is experiencing a resurgence of the right — driven, at least in part, by its effort to overcome past misdeeds by suppressing any vestige of nationalism.

Since World War II, trying to define the German national identity, much less celebrate it, has been taboo. Doing so was seen as a possible step toward the kind of nationalism that once enabled the Nazi regime. [German] Flags were frowned upon, as was standing for the [German] national anthem.

End quote

I recall an incident, several years ago, when I was watching a parade of cars, down a main street, in a Germany city. Young men were sitting on top of the back seats of the cars, smiling and waving. A crowd of German people was standing on the street and waving to the men, but no one was cheering. Not the players, not the crowd of people.

I asked a German man who was standing near me: “What is going on?” He told me that these men were the players on a football team that had just won a national championship.

Finally, I understood: the German people were not allowed to have any pride. They had to forever hang their heads in shame because the Germans killed Jews many years ago.

It seems that now the Germans are taking back their pride in being German.  I am cheering for the German people.

The news article ends with this quote:

Begin quote

But spurred by a sense of lost control over the country’s borders, economy and politics, many Germans are reaching for a shared identity but finding only an empty space. Into that vacuum slipped the Alternative for Germany, known by its German initials, AfD, the nation’s fastest-growing party with recent polls showing support at 12 percent, ahead of some mainstream parties.

End quote

February 17, 2017

The Holocaust started at the Chelmno death camp

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — furtherglory @ 6:22 am
Monument on the banks of river Ner at Chelmno

Monument on the banks of the river Ner at Chelmno

[All photos on this page were sent to me by Alan Collins along with permission to use them]

The Chelmno death camp has historical significance because it is the first place where Jews were allegedly gassed in the genocide known as the Holocaust, which allegedly took the lives of six million Jews. The current official number of Jewish deaths in the Holocaust is 1.1 million.

According to Holocaust historian Martin Gilbert, the “Final Solution” began when 700 Jews from the Polish village of Kolo arrived at Chelmno on the evening of December 7, 1941 and on the following day, all of them were killed with carbon monoxide in gas vans. The victims were taken on 8 or 9 separate journeys in the gas vans to a clearing in the Rzuchowski woods near the town of Chelmno.

In his book entitled “Holocaust,” Martin Gilbert wrote the following:

Begin quote

On 7 December 1941, as the first seven hundred Jews were being deported to the death camp at Chelmno, Japanese aircraft attacked the United States Fleet at Pearl Harbor. Unknown at that time either to the Allies or the Jews of Europe, Roosevelt’s day that would “live in infamy” was also the first day of the “final solution.”

End quote

Memorial stone at Chelmno

Memorial stone at Chelmno

The text on the Memorial stone, in the photo above, says that “about 350,000 Jews – Men, women and children – were murdered at Chelmno.”

Martin Gilbert wrote in his book, entitled “Holocaust,” that 360,000 Jews were killed at Chelmno, just in the first phase of the killing, between December 7, 1941 and March 1943.

The US Holocaust Memorial Museum says that “at least 152,000” Jews were killed at Chelmno.

The Museum at the villa in Wannsee, near Berlin, says that “152,000 Jews and 5,000 Gypsies” were killed at Chelmno.

In other words, none of the Holocaust experts seem to know how many Jews were killed at Chelmno. My guess is that no Jews were killed there. I believe that Chelmno was a transit camp, where Jews were held until they could be sent on to a concentration camp.

Museum at Chelmno

Jewish Museum at Chelmno

Tombstones stacked against wall of Museum

Tombstones stacked against wall of Museum at Chelmno

Wait a minute! The Nazis provided tombstones for the Jews who were killed at Chelmno? Still, the Nazis get no respect!

You can read more about Chelmno on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Poland/Chelmno/index.html

 

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