Scrapbookpages Blog

June 16, 2017

Classic Bergen Belsen Dozer footage

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 1:40 pm

I believe that this is a classic clip from the film on the liberation of Bergen Belsen, showing Jews who died of typhus being placed into mass graves by a British soldier using a bulldozer.  The clip caption falsely claims it is a Nazi bulldozer.

Bergen Belsen is back in the News

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 1:01 pm

The famous photo below is from news reel footage that was shown in American theaters. It shows a British soldier shoving Jewish bodies into a mass grave at Bergen-Belsen.

Bulldozer.jpeg

The Bergen Belsen concentration camp is the place where Anne Frank died. Remember that as you read this news article: http://theislandnow.com/new_hyde_park-108/holocaust-survivors-share-stories-strength-remembrance-forum/

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

Memories of the Holocaust are as fresh as they were decades ago for the women who were forced into World War II concentration camps as children and miraculously lived to tell the tale as adults.

“When you look at these survivors, know you’re looking at miracles,” Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County Senior Director of Education Beth Lilach said. “For any child to have survived the Holocaust is nothing less than a miracle because it was a very intentional plan by the Nazis to destroy every single Jewish child, so these people represent the tiny percent of Jewish children that survived.”

Parker Jewish Institute hosted “Stories of Strength: a Holocaust Remembrance” Thursday afternoon to document the stories of three survivors.

Chana Pfeifen, Alice Tenenbaum and Mia Feuer, wife of survivor Samuel Feuer, shared memories with a heartbroken audience as they recounted tales of gas chambers, death marches and the traumatic loss of their parents at the hands of the guards and doctors who imprisoned them.

Lilach opened the forum with a presentation focused around what can be learned from the Holocaust and how many times history could have gone differently with earlier help from countries around the world.

“By looking at the evolution of Nazism, you see so many red flags when the Holocaust could have been stopped,” Lilach said. “We need to look to see if our country is experiencing any of these red flags, and we need to act on it. We can’t be silent — that was an incredibly destructive force during the Holocaust, and we need to speak up.”

End quote

I wrote at length about Bergen Belsen on my website, starting at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/BergenBelsen/Introduction.html

The following quote is from my website:

Begin quote

Bergen-Belsen was the name of an infamous Nazi camp which has become a symbol of the Holocaust that claimed the lives of 6 million Jews in Europe more than sixty years ago. In 1943, Bergen-Belsen was initially set up as a detention camp (Aufenthaltslager) for prisoners who held foreign passports and were thus eligible to be traded for German citizens being held in Allied internment camps. In December 1944, Bergen-Belsen became a concentration camp under the command of Josef Kramer, the former Commandant of the Auschwitz II camp, also known as Birkenau.

A section for sick prisoners, who could no longer work in the Nazi forced labor camps, was set aside at Bergen-Belsen in March 1944. In 1945, when World War II was drawing to a close, civilian prisoners were evacuated from other concentration camps as Soviet troops advanced westward; thousands of these prisoners were brought to the Bergen-Belsen camp which was not equipped to handle such a large number of people.

Finally, Bergen-Belsen itself was right in the middle of the war zone where bombs were falling and Allied planes were strafing the Autobahn and the railroads. British and Germans troops were doing battle on the Lüneberg heath right outside the camp. In February 1945, the situation at Bergen-Belsen became catastrophic when a typhus epidemic broke out in the crowded camp.

End quote

Jewish survivor of Mauthausen camp reveals that he wore a bracelet with his prison number

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — furtherglory @ 10:20 am

Holocaust survivors usually show their prison number tattooed on their arm, but not this survivor.

You can read about the Holocaust survivor Ed Mosberg who was not tattooed, but instead wore a bracelet on his arm which was engraved with his prison number: http://www.newstatesman.com/culture/2017/06/every-day-holocaust-day-me-concentration-camp-survivor-ed-mosberg-reliving-trauma

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

A 92-year-old man is sitting at a café terrace on London’s Southbank, munching resolutely on sugar lumps. Bright morning sunshine bounces off the dome of St Paul’s Cathedral, whose bells you can hear across the river where he sits.

As he sips black coffee, his checked blazer sleeve rides up to reveal a bracelet bearing the number 85454. It is the original prison number plate, about the size of a razor blade, he was forced to wear on a wire around his wrist by the Nazis at Mauthausen concentration camp.

“That was my name,” he says, when he catches me looking. He had it fixed to a gold chain, so that whenever someone asks him what it is, he can tell his story.

End quote

I have a whole section on my website about the Mauthausen camp: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/KZMauthausen/index.html

I wrote about the victims at Mauthausen on this page of my website: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/KZMauthausen/Victims/index.html

June 14, 2017

Elie Wiesel at the corner of Liar and Fraud in New York City

Filed under: Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 8:07 am

ShowImage.ashx.jpeg

A street corner in New York City was recently named after Elie Wiesel. You can read about it in the news at http://www.jpost.com/International/New-York-street-corner-named-after-Elie-Wiesel-496804

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

The southwest corner of 84th Street and Central Park West in New York will now be known as Elie Wiesel Way, honoring the Holocaust survivor, Nobel Peace Prize winner and celebrated author a year after his death.

A moving ceremony to unveil the co-naming of the street on Tuesday was attended by dignitaries including New York Mayor Bill DeBlasio and members of the Wiesel family.

End quote

I have written about Elie Wiesel on my website at: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/AuschwitzScrapbook/History/Articles/HungarianJews4.html

June 13, 2017

Holocaust survivor writes his memoir at the age of 90

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 11:06 am

90-year-old Holocaust survivor Samuel Pivnik visits  the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp where he was a prisoner

Note that, in the photo above, you can see a faint view of the gate into the camp. My photo below shows the same view of the gate into the Auschswitz-Birkenau camp.

My photo of the gate into Auschwitz-Birkenau

Auschwitz-Birkenau was a death camp where Jews were killed in gas chambers with Zyklon-B gas; why was Samuel Pivnik spared?

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at http://www.dw.com/en/why-one-of-the-last-remaining-auschwitz-survivors-wrote-a-memoir-decades-later/a-39208305

Begin quote

DW: Mister Pivnik, you are 90 years old. Why did you decide to tell your story in a book recently? The book, “Survivor: Auschwitz, the Death March and my Fight for Freedom,” was published in English in 2013 and in German in 2017. Why not earlier?

Samuel Pivnik: It was only in the late 1990s that I seriously started to consider writing my memoirs. Other survivors I knew had already written books.

Sam Pivnik (Philip Appleby) Pivnik, now 90, lives in London

There was really no interest in our stories immediately after the war. It wasn’t until I was approached by a close friend of mine in 1999, the artist David Breuer-Weil, who urged me very strongly to write. He felt that I had an obligation to humanity to tell my story so that people could learn lessons that may help to prevent them from descending into the depths of depravity again. I then began to seriously start the process. It wasn’t until 2011 that my agent introduced me to a professional ghostwriter named Mei Trow. As a result of my work with him, the book started to interest big publishers.

End quote

The photo at the top of this page shows the railroad tracks into the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp. Jews were brought on trains to this death camp and were allegedly gassed to death immediately with Zyklon-B.

Auschwitz is a name that was virtually unknown before 1989. Now it has become a symbol for The Holocaust, which was the Nazi plan to systematically exterminate all the Jews of Europe; this allegedly resulted in the deaths of 6 million Jews.

Auschwitz is the site of the greatest mass murder of all time, the most infamous Nazi death factory, the primary killing site where the “Final Solution to the Jewish Question” was carried out by means of homicidal gas chambers, the most heinous place on earth.

An estimated 1.3 million victims arrived at Auschwitz between June 1940 and January 1945 and 1.1 million of them died there, including over 900,000 Jews. Today there are millions of visitors who tour Auschwitz-Birkenau each year.

The world first learned that the Jews were being gassed at Auschwitz when resistance fighters in the Polish Underground passed this information on to the Polish government in exile in Great Britain.

On June 25, 1942, The Telegraph, a British newspaper, ran a story about the mass murder of Jews in gas chambers at Auschwitz. The headline read “Germans murder 700,000 Jews in Poland.” According to this first report, which was also broadcast on the radio by the British BBC in June 1942, a thousand Jews a day were being gassed.

Auschwitz is more than one place: it is a small town in what is now Poland, but the name Auschwitz also refers to three separate prison camps called Auschwitz I, Auschwitz II and Auschwitz III, all of which were located just outside the town. The Auschwitz complex was an extermination camp, a labor camp, a transit camp and a concentration camp, all rolled into one.

Auschwitz I was the main camp; it was a Class I concentration camp, which was opened in June 1940 in the barracks of a former Polish Army garrison. The first prisoners were mostly non-Jewish Polish political prisoners, but a few Jews were also imprisoned there.

Auschwitz II was the death camp where million of prisoners, mainly Jews, were allegedly killed, mostly in gas chambers; today, Auschwitz is the world’s largest Jewish graveyard, the place where the ashes of innocent victims were scattered over the fields, thrown into the rivers, or dumped into several small ponds sixty five years ago.

Auschwitz III was a work camp where prisoners worked in the factories of the I.G. Farben company, along side civilian workers who were not prisoners.

The town of Auschwitz, which was originally founded by Germans in 1270, is now known by its Polish name, Oswiecim, and the three camps are known as Auschwitz, Birkenau, and Monowitz. The Polish name for Birkenau is Brzezinka and Monowitz is called Monowice by the Poles.

In June 2007, the United Nations officially changed the collective name of the three Auschwitz camps to Auschwitz-Birkenau, German Nazi Concentration and Extermination Camp (1940-1945). This change was made at the request of the government of Poland so that people will know that Poland had nothing to do with setting up the camps or running them.

 

 

June 12, 2017

Lies about Anne Frank in today’s news

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — furtherglory @ 8:53 am

You can read the latest version of the Anne Frank story in this recent news article: https://www.livescience.com/59449-anne-frank-diary-75th-anniversary.html

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

Teenage Anne Frank, who was only 16 when she was killed in the Nazi death camp Bergen-Belsen, wrote in this diary throughout the two years she spent in hiding with her family and four other Dutch Jews, between 1942 and 1944. Their refuge was a secret attic apartment, concealed behind her family’s business office in Amsterdam.

End quote

Bergen-Belsen was NOT a “Nazi death camp” — it was an EXCHANGE CAMP where prisoners in Germany were exchanged for prisoners in America.

I wrote about the Bergen-Belsen exchange camp on this blog post: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2016/01/04/anne-frank-died-in-bergen-belsen-extermination-camp-who-knew/

I have a detailed description of the house where Anne went into hiding, on this page of my website: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/AnneFrank/AnneFrank03.html

Everybody loves Anne Frank. Her story is used to incriminate the German people. Every school child in America knows that poor little Anne Frank was cooped up in an attic because the bad Germans were after her father who never did anything wrong, but was wrongly discriminated against just because he was Jewish. Otto Frank was actually a fugitive from justice because he was a wanted criminal.

June 9, 2017

Trump wants to cut 3 million from funds for Washington, DC Holocaust Museum

Filed under: Holocaust, Trump, Uncategorized — furtherglory @ 2:01 pm

A two-part modern sculpture entitled “Loss and Regeneration”, designed by Jewish artist Joel Shapiro, who was born in America in 1941, stands in the courtyard of the US Holocaust Museum with one section near the sidewalk, and the other part near the door to the museum, as shown in my photo below.

My photo of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

You can read all about the US Holocaust Memorial Museum on my blog at https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/tag/us-holocaust-memorial-museum/

According to the recent news article, President Trump wants to cut 3 million dollars from the budget for the US Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington DC.  Where is Trump’s Jewish son-in-law Jared Kushner when we need him?

You can read all about the budget cut in this news article: http://thehill.com/policy/finance/337140-trump-faces-backlash-over-3m-holocaust-museum-cuts

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

A bipartisan group of 64 members of Congress is demanding a reversal on $3 million in funding cuts to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum proposed in President Trump’s budget.

“In our view, the mission of the museum has never been more important, particularly as the number of anti-Semitic attacks around the world rises,” the letter to the Interior appropriations subcommittee said. “Now is not the time to cut funding for this national treasure.”

The letter, spearheaded by Reps. Stephanie Murphy, (D-Fla.), Carlos Curbelo (R-Fla.), John Katko, (R-N.Y.) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.), highlights the challenges Trump faces in cutting funds to popular programs. Trump’s budget proposal shifts $54 billion in nondefense discretionary funding to defense and proposes deep cuts to social safety net and health programs.

The reduction, which would return the museum’s budget to its 2016 level of $54 million, is roughly a 5 percent decrease.

End quote

Trump wants to cut the funds to the US Holocaust Museum to a measly $54 million. For shame!

My photo of the entrance to Holocaust Museum on 15th Street

I have a whole section on my scrapbookpages.com website about the Museum: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/USHMM/index.html

On this page of my website, you can read about the exterior of the Museum: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/USHMM/Exterior.html

 

 

June 8, 2017

Dachau Survivor Steve Ross is back in the news

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust, World War II — furtherglory @ 3:56 pm

In this undated World War II-era photograph provided by Many Hats Productions, Holocaust survivor Steve Ross wears a Nazi prison camp uniform. The Holocaust survivor’s life is recounted in a new documentary titled “Etched in Glass: The Legacy of Steve Ross,” premiering in Newton, Mass., Wednesday, June 7, 2017. The film recounts the former Boston youth counselor’s five years spent in Nazi concentration camps as a child and his decadeslong search for the American soldier who gave him a U.S. flag handkerchief during the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp in Germany. (courtesy of the family via Many Hats Productions via AP)

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The photo and text shown above are from this news article: http://www.militarytimes.com/articles/film-spotlights-holocaust-survivors-search-for-us-soldier

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

Ross’ search for the benevolent soldier and his life after the war is recounted in a new documentary screened in the Boston suburb of West Newton on Wednesday evening.

“Etched in Glass: The Legacy of Steve Ross” focuses on the five years Ross spent in concentration camps to his life as a war orphan in America, his career helping at-risk youths in Boston and his successful efforts to erect the striking glass New England Holocaust Memorial in downtown Boston.

Ross, now 90 and his speech limited by a stroke, attended Wednesday’s screening with his family, the filmmakers and members of the soldier’s family.

“It’s not your typical Holocaust film,” said Roger Lyons, the director of the nearly hourlong film. “Steve is a unique person. He took his second life and he really ran with it.”

End quote

Steve Ross is the boy on the far left

I wrote about Steve Ross in this previous blog post:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2012/11/14/the-day-that-holocaust-survivor-stephan-ross-was-liberated-from-dachau/

and on this previous blog post:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2013/08/11/holocaust-survivor-steve-ross-recovering-from-a-stroke-cant-remember-details-of-dachau-liberation/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 4, 2017

What can students learn on a one-hour trip to Dachau?

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 5:33 pm

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at http://www.usctrojans.com/sports/w-volley/spec-rel/053017aaa.html

Student enters the former Dachau camp

The following is a quote from the news article:

This morning, we started the final day of our trip in Munich. The [volleyball] team had a great breakfast at the hotel before we took a bus ride about 10 miles out of town to Dachau. Our visit to the concentration camp memorial was a short trip, but it was nice to see it, and something I think everyone should experience.

I think if you’re going to make the trip, or visit that concentration camp, it’s in your best interest to take at least a couple of hours instead of just one hour. It’s a really heavy experience and it’s really emotional; and I think in order to really appreciate it and have respect for the place itself, you do need to take a couple more hours and really take in what it may have been like to be there as someone who was a prisoner of that camp.

It was rough though. I cried a couple of times and I know that Brittany [Abercrombie] almost threw up because it was all just very gnarly. There’s really not a lot to visually take it that would otherwise make you emotionally or physically sick, but it’s more of the reading and realizing throughout the experience that this is what people were doing or living through on a daily basis.

It was really hot out today; about 77 to 80 degrees out, and I just remember walking through there and thinking to myself, “wow, I can’t wait until we get back to air conditioning.” But then, to think of the people who were there, the prisoners of this war, and in that camp specifically… there was no A/C. Many of them died from heat exhaustion, and were working in extreme conditions, whether it was cold in the winter or hot in the summers.

Seeing the gas chambers with the gurneys in them, I was just like, “oh my god.” Reading that they would put two or three bodies in there [an oven] at a time was just incredible. Looking around at all of my teammates and other people at the camp, it was impossible to imagine that human beings were treated like objects. It wasn’t even that long ago. It was less than 100 years ago.

Our visit to the barracks with the bunk beds and how they were all really confined in spaces was really gnarly. I’ve had a hard time rooming with one other person and in two separate beds. I can’t even imagine being one of four or more people in one small space together. It was literally just enough for someone to lie flat on his or her back and you’re probably right next to someone, and there’s zero privacy.

People were there for years on end. It’s so hard to fathom and wrap my mind around something like that. Thinking about it, we’re so spoiled now with what we have. It’s just crazy that people’s lives were stripped of their humanity and people were treated like animals. It basically felt like they were chickens in chicken coops and that’s pretty much how these people were living everyday. I don’t even know how to describe it. The men who were running these concentration camps… to completely just look at other people as animals and not as human beings; and to do the things that they did to them; beat them to death, murder them on the spot, and put them in these gas chambers, and burn them alive, it’s a really, really heavy thing.

Throughout history in general, we learn from it and hope to not make the same mistakes later in life. I think it’s amazing that the camp is still there for people to go visit as a living example of the past. It’s huge for people to go see it and to use it as an experience and to learn from it so that we don’t repeat history or repeat something like this.

Visiting this camp at the end of the trip was interesting. Throughout our 12-day trip, we were all exhausted, because it was day in and day out getting up early and being on the go; just constantly moving. I know a lot of us may have complained at some point about doing certain things or about how tired we were, but visiting Dachau at the end of our trip really put things in perspective, and I hope it made an impression on all of our girls.

At the end of the day, we do all get to go home, and we do get to rest and feel comfortable where we are. That’s something the people imprisoned at that camp could never have done and some never even imagined. We were traveling for 12 days, and I mean, these people were there for years. It’s just crazy. I wish that we had more time there to really experience the whole thing.

As far as volleyball goes, I felt this trip helped us learn how to work together; work out some of the kinks that we’ve had. We tried a couple of our different rotations and we learned different things about different players. For instance, I feel like at the end of this trip, my hitters learned how to trust me more, and I can feel that. It showed as we progressed throughout the trip.

Spending time together in general, we learned more about each other and we learned how to be more comfortable with each other. In any team sport, it’s much more difficult to work with a bunch of people if you don’t really get to know each other or if you don’t really hang out together. It’s about learning to trust each other off the court and translating that to trusting each other on the court. I think it just creates this gelling environment and I think it flows right into when we move on to the fall.

This whole trip is an experience that I will not soon forget, but I will definitely remember the camp at Dachau today. I want to come back at some point to properly visit it. Something else I will never forget is the alpine sled that we rode down in Maribor.

End quote

Why am I quoting this article about a visit to Dachau, you ask?

I find it remarkable that these students had no idea why certain people were put in camps while a war was going on. They thought that the Nazis were bad people who were being mean to people for no reason.

June 3, 2017

Holocaust survivor, who was saved by being on Schindler’s List, tells her story

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, movies, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 2:23 pm

Rena Farber was on Schindler's List

Rena Farber, who is shown in the photo above, was 10 when the Nazis invaded Poland in 1939. As her family was forced into a ghetto, her father tried to reassure her not to worry. “The world will hear about us. They will come and save us.” But the world did not intervene to save the Jews of Europe.

The Nazis took her father away and she never saw him again. As she and her mother were leaving their apartment in Krakow, she tried knocking on neighbors’ doors. “But no one had the courage to say goodbye.”

Of those neighbors, she said, “They were ordinary people, like the people you come across everyday.
Read more: http://www.lowellsun.com/news/ci_31021725/bearing-witness-horror-and-heroism#ixzz4iyYrUElN

I have written several blog posts about Schindler’s List, including this one: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2011/05/25/schindlers-list-the-movie-is-fiction-fiction-fiction/

You can also  read more about Schindler’s List on this blog post that I wrote: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2015/07/13/20th-anniversary-of-schindlers-list/

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