Scrapbookpages Blog

July 28, 2016

the story of Reinhard Gehlen

Filed under: Germany, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 8:56 am

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One of the regular readers of my blog mentioned the name Reinhard Gehlen, who is shown in the photo above, in this comment:

Begin quote from comment

I did have that one ol boy that popped up with the results I got for Gehiem. This dudes name was Reinhard Gehlen. I don’t trust ol Reinhard. There’s something shady about him.”

End comment

Reinhard Gehlen has gotten a bad rap because he was a traitor; he left Germany before World War II was over and came to America where he joined the side of the enemy.

Here is the story on Reinhard Gehlen:

In 1943, the Allied powers had already started making plans for their occupation of Germany after the war, which by that time they anticipated winning.

There were major conferences at Teheran, Moscow and Yalta in 1943 and 1944 where resolutions were passed regarding the means necessary to secure the occupation.

On August 2, 1945, these resolutions were confirmed and the details were planned at the Potsdam Conference, held in a suburb of Berlin. By that time, Roosevelt was dead, and President Harry Truman was the one making the decisions at the Potsdam conference, along with Churchill and Stalin. For the first time, France was also included as the fourth victorious power.

According to the Potsdam Agreement, the officials of the Nazi party and its organizations, members of the Gestapo, and anyone who might endanger the goals of the occupation were to be interned in concentration camps. Not included were Nazis who might be of use to America, like General Reinhard von Gehlen, the chief of the Nazi spy organization, and Werner von Braun, the head of Germany’s V-2 rocket program.

The former Nazi concentration camps at Dachau, Buchenwald and Sachsenhausen were to be converted into internment camps for German political prisoners, while thousands of Nazi scientists were to be taken to America and the Soviet Union.

General Reinhard von Gehlen was sneaked into the United States wearing an American uniform, even before the German surrender, and became part of the new American intelligence agency, called the CIA, after the war.

In the first half of 1945, approximately 6,000 German Army officers were released by the Western Allies, but were then arrested by the Soviets and held in Zone II at Sachsenhausen. Later the Zone II barracks were filled with German prisoners who had been sentenced by a Soviet military tribunal to 15 years of hard labor. Until 1950, a large number of German citizens were imprisoned by the Soviet Union and forced to perform slave labor in the gulags of Siberia.

End of story

Many years ago, I attended a lecture given by David Irving. At the beginning of his talk, Irving asked: “Who knows anything about  Reinhard Gehlen?” I held up my hand: “I do, I do.”

Irving was amazed at this. At that time, he had a reputation for thinking that all women were stupid.

He didn’t ask me how I knew the name Reinhard Gehlen, so I was not able to tell him that I had learned about Gehlen when I visited the memorial site at the Sachsenhausen concentration camp, where German prisoners were held after the end of World War II.

At the Sachsenhausen memorial site, I picked up a pamphlet which had the following information:
“The history of the Special Camp of the Soviet Secret Service (NKVD) in Germany must be viewed in light of the circumstances and events of World War II as well as the Soviet camp system (Gulag).”

The Information Leaflet explained the reason for the camp, from the Communist winner’s point of view.

Begin quote from pamphlet:

The Second World War which the German Reich began in 1939, and the genocide which the Nazis pursued against Jew, Sinti and Roma, and other groups who had been declared racially inferior by the regime, caused widespread misery and destruction of unknown proportions for that time throughout Europe until the end of the war in spring 1945.

In spite of the impossibility of winning the world war, which since 1943 had been pursued as a “total war,” up to the end the political and military leadership of the “Third Reich” was not prepared to capitulate.

The Allies had to militarily overpower National Socialist Germany costing them great losses. Moreover, the propaganda of the Nazi regime conveyed the impression that after Germany was occupied, the National Socialist would continue their struggle against the allied troops with the “Werewolf” organization.

End quote

According to the same Information Leaflet available at the Sachsenhausen Memorial Site, conditions in Special Camp No. 7 were deplorable, as the following quote explains.

Begin quote

Hunger and cold prevailed in the Special Camp. The inadequate hygienic and sanitary conditions and the insufficient nourishment led to disease and epidemics. Usually the barracks were overcrowded; the prisoners had to sleep on the bare wood frames until 1947, when the Soviet camp administration distributed blankets and bags of straw.

The only clothing which the prisoners had during their imprisonment was what they were wearing at the time of their arrest. The possession of personal items, particularly books and writing material was strictly forbidden.

Violations of these rigid camp regulations, which were for the most part unknown to most of the prisoners, resulted in harsh punishment imposed by the Soviet guard personnel or the German prisoners who held special functions.

Unlike the camps in the Soviet Union, the special camps were not work camps. The prisoners suffered much more from forced idleness. This is why the assignment to one of the few work commandos serving the camp’s self-sufficiency was regarded as a privilege.

The prisoners attempted to at least temporarily escape the monotony of their daily routine in the camps by participating in any activities. Most of them [activities] were prohibited, such as lectures, lessons, singing and improving the appearance of the barracks. Only after the first order for releases in 1948 were the conditions alleviated somewhat by the allowance of board games, sports, and occasionally newspapers and radio reports.

End quote

Several of the brick barracks in Zone II were open to visitors, when I toured the Sachsenhausen Memorial Site.  Inside were TV monitors where one could see videos of interviews with the survivors, who told about the horrendous conditions in the prison.

According to one survivor, the windows of the barracks were blocked out so that the prisoners were kept in almost total darkness. They had to sleep on bare boards with no mattresses and were furnished with only a block of wood for a pillow.

End of story

July 27, 2016

Why are visitors to Auschwitz not allowed to see Block 14?

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, World War II — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 9:57 am

Today, I am writing about the Russian exhibits at the Auschwitz main camp which are no longer open to tourists. You can read all about it at https://www.rt.com/news/controversy-remains-over-auschwitz-museum-exhibition/

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

As [the] dispute about the contents of the Russian exhibition at the Auschwitz Museum in Poland continues, the doors of the display remain closed. The nationalities of the victims of Nazi concentration camps are in question.

Block 14 of the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum in Oswiecim, Poland was opened in 1961 as a Soviet tribute to the victims of the Nazi concentration camp. The exhibition has been closed for over three years now, and its doors remain closed as disagreement over the nationalities of the victims becomes an increasingly political issue.

It was in 1945 that Soviet troops liberated Auschwitz and were the first to expose the truth of the Nazi death camp to the world. But today the museum operates without recognizing Russian efforts in the Second World War, and the role of the Soviet Army in the liberation of the camp is almost never spoken of. Tourists don’t know why the exhibition is closed.

The museum’s administration says the complex does not agree with the Russian interpretation of history that is portrayed in the display. Curators claim that the occupation of Poland, which occurred following the 1939 Nazi-Soviet Pact, is not reflected in the Russian exhibit.

End quote

Block 15 at Auschwitz is open to visitors

My photo of Block 15 at Auschwitz which is open to visitors

When I visited Auschwitz in 2005, and again in 2007, the visitors’ tour of the main Auschwitz camp began in Block 15, shown in my photo above. This building houses an exhibit entitled “Historical Introduction”.

The building is located at the corner of the first intersection of the camp streets after you pass the camp kitchen near the “Arbeit Macht Frei” gate, which is behind the camera on the left in the photo above.

Organized groups begin their tour of the museum buildings at Block 15, and then move on to Blocks 4, 5, 6, and 7 which are in the last row of barracks buildings.

Blocks 4, 5, 6, and 7, at the former Auschwitz I concentration camp, have been converted from barracks into museum rooms with glass display cases. All of these exhibit buildings are located on the second cross street, to your right after you enter through the “Arbeit Macht Frei” gate. At the end of this street is Block 11, the prison block which is also open to visitors.

In Block 5, there are displays devoted to the “Material Evidence of Crime.” One of the saddest sights at Auschwitz is the display of shoes in a huge glass case that takes up half a barracks room in Block 5.

Shoes.jpg

The shoes seem to be deteriorating and are mostly the same dark gray color, except for a few women’s or children’s shoes that are made of red leather. The red shoes stand out like the red coat worn by the little girl in Schindler’s List, a black and white picture.

There is a large display case in Block 5, taking up half of a barracks room, which contains the suitcases brought by Jewish victims to the camp. The Jews were instructed to mark their suitcases for later identification; you can still see the names written on the leather cases in large letters in the photo below.

Suitcases.jpg

On some of the suitcases is the word Waisenkind, which means orphan; this is proof that there were children among the victims at Auschwitz.

Block 4 has exhibits entitled “Extermination.” Holocaust historians define the German noun Ausrottung to mean extermination. The word can also mean “get rid of.”

Among the exhibits in Block 4 is a model of one of the gas chambers at Birkenau, which was used to “exterminate” the Jews.

Auschwitz4.jpg

Photo Credit: Lukasz Trzcinskihttp://www.lukasztrzcinski.comIn Room 5, of Block 4, there is a huge glass display case, about the size of a walk-in closet, filled with hair cut from the heads of an estimated 140,000 victims. The hair, which is shown in the photo above, appears to be deteriorating badly, and most of it has turned the same shade of dark gray. This is a truly disgusting sight and one that a visitor won’t soon forget.

The exhibits in Block 6 are about the “Everyday Life of the Prisoner.” Included in the exhibits are some of the enamelware dishes brought to the camps by the victims, as well as display cases of eyeglasses, brushes and even a display of the lids from cold cream jars and flat cans of shoe shine wax.

There is a glass case with moth-eaten baby sweaters and another with Jewish prayer shawls which are old and worn, and have been extensively darned and patched.

One of the exhibits in Block 6 shows the blue and gray striped uniforms worn by the prisoners.

Another display in Block 6 shows a typical day’s ration of food: a chunk of coarse whole grain bread the size of four thick slices and a large, red enamel bowl of gray looking soup. This is real food which was put into a glass case where it is deteriorating like the other displays. The sickening effect of all this was overwhelming, when I saw it in 2005.

In Block 7 there are exhibits about the “Living and Sanitary Conditions” in the former concentration camp. In this building, there are three-tiered bunk beds like the ones that can be seen in the barracks at Birkenau.

Block 27 has special displays about the Jewish prisoners; these displays were put up after the fall of Communism when the plight of the Jews in the camps was given more importance at the Auschwitz museum.

The whole Auschwitz museum puts heavy emphasis on the resistance movement, and in keeping with this theme, there is a special section on the second floor which is devoted to the Jewish resistance to the Nazis, both inside the camp and on the outside. Jewish partisans fought with the Polish Home Army, known as the Armia Krajowa or Polish AK, and also organized resistance on their own.

Block27.jpg

In front of Block 27, shown in the photo above, is a small memorial stone to the Jews who were gassed; it is the only memorial specifically dedicated to the Jews in all of Auschwitz.

Most of the Jews were sent to Auschwitz II, otherwise known as Birkenau, which had enough barrack’s space to house between 90,000 to 200,000 prisoners at one time.

Auschwitz I was strictly a camp for prisoners who were able to work in the factories; the old, the young and the sick were sent to Birkenau.

Block 27 is located on the first street that intersects the main camp street, as you enter through the “Arbeit Macht Frei” gate. Turn to your right on this street and go past the camp kitchen to Block 27.

Blocks 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, and 21 have exhibits devoted to the various nations that were victimized by the Nazis.

GypsyMuseum.jpg

Block 13 has a Museum devoted to the Extermination of the European Roma, known to Americans as Gypsies. The photo above is a display in this Museum. When I visited this museum in September 2005, I was the only person there.

The exhibits in Block 16 are entitled “The Tragedy of Slovak Jews. Prisoners from the Czech Lands at Auschwitz.”

Block 17 has exhibits about the prisoners sent to Auschwitz from Yugoslavia and Austria. Elie Wiesel and his father allegedly stayed in the barracks in Block 17 for three weeks before being sent to work in the factories at Auschwitz III. All of the prisoners were kept in quarantine for a few weeks to make sure they were not suffering from any communicable diseases.

The title of the exhibit in Block 18 is “The Citizen Betrayed, to the Memory of the Hungarian Holocaust.” The Hungarian Jews were not deported until the Spring of 1944 after the country had been taken over by the German Army.

Block 20 is in honor of the “People Deported from France to Auschwitz from March 1942 to January 27, 1945.”

Block 21 is devoted to the “Persecution and deportation of Jews in the Netherlands, 1940 – 1945.” People from Italy, who were deported to Auschwitz, are also included in the exhibits in Block 21.

July 23, 2016

Did Germany really start World War II?

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, World War II — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 9:33 am

I have been having a lengthy discussion, with one of the regular readers of my blog, about who started World War II, Germany or Poland?

Here is the kosher version of the start of World War II, from this kosher website:

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/germans-invade-poland

Begin quote from website above

 

 

July 17, 2016

Throw Mama from the train a kiss

Filed under: Germany, movies, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 7:30 pm

The following quote, from this news article, made me think of a famous line, allegedly spoken by immigrants to America, and I used it for the title of my blog post.

Begin quote from news article:

A Holocaust survivor has relived the childhood horror of watching a Nazi death squad gun down her mother, during a talk at a Baldock school.

End quote

Note that Hannah’s mother was gunned down “during a talk at a Baldock school.”

The photo of Hannah Lewis, shown below, was included in the news article. LitttleHannah

The following quote is from the news article:

Hannah was born in 1937 in Włodawa, a market town in eastern Poland where Jews made up about half the population before the war and the Nazi occupation.

In 1943 she and her family were rounded up and sent to a forced labour camp in Adampol.

Her father and cousin were able to escape, join the resistance and warn Haya that a Nazi Einsatzgruppe (death squad) was on the way – but Haya stayed because she was unable to move Hannah, who had typhus.

On liberation Hannah was found starved and hiding in a ditch by a Red Army soldier, and was reunited with her father. She moved to Britain in 1949 and now has four children and eight grandchildren.

End quote

The Death’s Head symbol was worn by the Einsatzgruppen, the soldiers who followed behind the regular troops, killing the Communists and Jews, when the German Army invaded Russia on June 22, 1941. The Death’s Head symbol was also worn by the guards in the Nazi concentration camps.

SeppDietrich02

General Sepp Dietrich is shown wearing a death’s head emblem on his cap

 

July 12, 2016

the 75th anniversary of a massacre of hundreds of Polish Jews by their neighbors

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 11:16 am

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at http://www.timesofisrael.com/poles-skip-ceremony-to-mark-holocaust-era-jewish-massacre/

Begin quote

JEDWABNE, Poland (JTA) — Some 150 people attended a commemoration on the 75th anniversary of a massacre of hundreds of Polish Jews by their neighbors in the country’s northeast. Absent, however, were the non-Jewish residents of Jedwabne.

End quote

One interesting thing, that you may not know about Jedwabne, is that Martin Zaidenstadt, an old man who used to walk around the Dachau Memorial Site, begging for money from the tourists, claimed to be from Jedwabne.

Martin Zaidenstadt claimed that he was born in 1911 in Jedwabne, a town in Poland that was the site of a pogrom in 1941 when the non-Jews in the town killed over 500 Jewish residents and blamed it on the German troops during the German invasion of the Soviet Union.

My 1997 photo of Martin Zaidenstadt

My 1997 photo of Martin Zaidenstadt

DS087

I was told by a resident of Dachau that Martin Zaidenstadt formerly lived in this house in Dachau which has a beautiful garden in front of it.

On my third visit to the Dachau Memorial Site in May 2003, I looked for Martin Zaidenstadt, whom I had met on my first visit in May 1997, but he wasn’t there. On my second visit in May 2001, I had been told by someone in the Dachau museum that Martin still came to the camp each day to talk with the tourists, but that he had been absent for a few days.

After the Dachau concentration camp was liberated on April 29, 1945, truckloads of American soldiers arrived daily to visit the museum and see the gas chamber, on the orders of General Dwight D. Eisenhower.

When I met Martin Zaidenstadt in 1997, he told me that he had been coming to the camp every day for fifty years. That would mean that he began visiting the former concentration camp in 1947 while it was an internment camp for Nazi war criminals and the proceedings of an American Military Tribunal were in progress.

At that time, there was a small museum in the Dachau crematorium, which had been set up in 1945 by a former prisoner, Erich Preuss, and several former Dachau inmates, who were then living in the SS garrison next to the former camp, were available to tell visiting American soldiers about the atrocities committed at Dachau.

Martin allowed me to take his picture, but requested that he pose in front of the Memorial stone which is just to your right as you enter the crematoria area. Just as I snapped the shutter, he was reaching into his coat pocket for one of his cards which he gave me. The card had a rainbow on it because the camp was liberated by the 42nd Rainbow division of the US Seventh Army.

Martin told me that he had been a prisoner at Dachau for three years before the camp was liberated. That means that he arrived some time in the Spring of 1942, just after the Nazis began rounding up the Jews in February 1942 and sending them to the death camps in what is now Poland. For some unexplained reason, Zaidenstadt was sent to Dachau instead, so he escaped the gas chambers of Auschwitz, Majdanek, Treblinka, Sobibor and Belzec and the gas vans at Chelmno.

Martin spoke several languages, including English. He used to hang out near Baracke X, the gas chamber building, where he would tell visitors that the gas chamber was used to murder prisoners in the Dachau concentration camp, although for some unexplained reason, he managed to avoid the gas chamber for three years. On the day that I met him in 1997, I approached him because he was upset after a group of Americans had rudely brushed him off after he tried to tell them about the shower room being used as a gas chamber.

When I visited Dachau in May 1997 and again in May 2001, there was a portable sign in the gas chamber which informed tourists in five languages that the room had never been used for gassing. In May 2003, that sign had been removed and a new sign at the south end of the gas chamber building read as follows:

“Baracke X erected May 1942 to April 1943. It was to serve both as a killing facility and to remove the dead, but the gas chamber in the middle of the building was not used for mass murder. Survivors have testified that the SS did, however, murder individual prisoners and small groups here using poison gas.”

 

July 1, 2016

What really happened at Bergen-Belsen

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 7:18 pm

A reader of my blog put up this website about the liberation of Bergen-Belsen:

http://www.bergenbelsen.co.uk/pages/Trial/Trial/TrialProsecutionCase/Trial_009_Berney.html

On my website, I have a section about the British liberation of Bergen-Belsen, which tells the true story of what happened:

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/BergenBelsen/BergenBelsen05.html

I also have these pages about Bergen Belsen on my website:

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/BergenBelsen/BergenBelsen09

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/BergenBelsen/BergenBelsen05

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/BergenBelsen/ConcentrationCamp.html

There were two small towns in the area where the camp was located: Bergen and Belsen

If you decide to go there, and you want to take a bus to the camp, don’t tell the bus driver that you want to got to Bergen-Belsen. He will say “Which one? Bergen or Belsen?  Tell the driver that you want to go to the Memorial site at the former Belsen camp.

June 20, 2016

What role did Albrecht Speer play in the Holocaust?

One of the readers of my blog asked this in a comment: “So you think that [Albrect] Speer should be prosecuted for what he did?  What did he do wrong?”

What did Albrect Speer do wrong? Part of what he did wrong was that he was Adolf Hitler’s best friend.  Speer was guilty by association.

In 1933, the airfield called the Zeppelin Field, which was outside the Nuremberg city center, was first used for the annual Nazi party rally because it offered a huge space for party members to gather and listen to the nationalistic speeches of Hitler, the party leader.

Heinrich Himmler stands behind Hitler was the first party rally

Heinrich Himmler stands behind Hitler at the first party rally

According to Albert Speer, Hitler’s architect, in his Memoirs entitled Inside the Third Reich, the first Nazi Party Rally was held at the Zeppelin field in 1933, after Hitler was appointed Chancellor of the Reich.

As Hitler’s official architect, Speer was commissioned to design a temporary reviewing stand at the Zeppelin Field. He designed a gigantic eagle with a wingspread of over 100 feet. “I spiked it to a timber framework like a butterfly in a collection,” Speer wrote.

Albrecht Speer designed this huge monument at the Zepplin Field

Albrecht Speer designed this huge monument at Zepplin Field

Speer wrote, in his autobiography, that he had designed the Tribüne at the Zeppelin Field so that it would still look beautiful even “after generations of neglect, overgrown with ivy, its columns fallen, the walls crumbling here and there, but the outlines still clearly recognizable.”

Speer was tried by the International Military Tribunal in Nuremberg in 1945; he was convicted and served 20 years in Spandau prison for his part in the “common plan” of the Nazis to commit war crimes. Speer was the man in charge of the forced labor camps in Germany during the war. In a footnote in his book, Speer mentioned that the Palace of Justice was repaired, in preparation for the International Military Tribunal, by the forced labor of the defeated Germans.

In September 1938, the last peacetime rally had taken place at Nuremberg. This was the largest Nazi rally ever held; there were around 700,000 members of various Nazi organizations which took part in the festivities which lasted for a week.

On Saturday, September 10, 1938, over 800,000 members of the Hitler Youth marched into the Nuremberg stadium and performed military style maneuvers which they had been practicing for a whole year. In the grand finale, they spelled out the name Adolf Hitler. Hitler gave a speech in which he said, “You, my youth, are our nation’s most precious guarantee for a great future, and you are destined to be the leaders of a glorious new order under the supremacy of National Socialism. Never forget that one day you will rule the world.”

As it turned out, Germany does not rule the world. The Germans are now ruled by the Jews, who have come back to live in Germany.

 

June 18, 2016

a set of photos that prove the Holocaust — NOT!

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, World War II — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 9:40 am
Reinhold Hanning

Reinhold Hanning sits in court as he listens to the verdict

You can read a news article about Reinhold Hanning, who was recently convicted of participating in the killing of the Jews at Auschwitz-Birkenau:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/auschwitz-guard-guilty-accessory-murder-charges-jailed-five-years-reinhold-hanning-nazi-germany-a7087341.html

You can see a set of photos which show the horror of the Holocaust at

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/auschwitz-guard-guilty-accessory-murder-charges-jailed-five-years-reinhold-hanning-nazi-germany-a7087341.html#gallery

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

A 94-year-old former Auschwitz guard has been convicted of being an accessory to the murder of at least 170,000 people, at the end of what is likely to be one of Germany’s last Holocaust trials.

Reinhold Hanning was sentenced to five years’ jail for facilitating the slaughter at the death camp in Nazi-occupied Poland, having served at Auschwitz during the Second World War between January 1942 and June 1944. He had faced a maximum sentence of 15 years.

During his four-month trial, Hanning admitted serving as an Auschwitz guard. He said he was ashamed that he was aware Jews were being killed but did nothing to try to stop it.

End quote

Herr Hanning appears to be in excellant health. I believe that Hanning will be able to serve his time in prison. All of the many Holocaust survivors, who are still alive, will be very happy with this verdict. REVENGE, REVENGE, REVANGE — the motto of the Jews.

 

 

 

 

 

June 14, 2016

the mother of Gene Simmons saw her mother walk into the gas chamber…

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, World War II — Tags: , , , , — furtherglory @ 8:08 am

165710_artist

The title of my blog post today comes from a line in a news article which you can read in full here:

Begin quote from news article:

[Gene] Simmons was born Chaim Witz in 1949. He and his mother immigrated [emigrated] to the United States from Israel when he was eight years old.

Speaking with Big Issue, Simmons discussed her [his mother’s] traumatizing past with the Nazis. “My mother was 14 when she was in the concentration camp in Nazi Germany,” he said. “My father left us when I was about six. She, bless her—she continues to be a force—she never spoke about it.”

Even though his mother didn’t want to discuss what she’d been through, Simmons pushed forward by investigating what it was like. “I did my own research and found out just now terrible it was,” he said. “I’ve tried to talk about it but she just won’t do it. She saw her mother walk into the gas chambers. Her whole family was destroyed. My mother was the only one left alive. And she was 14. I’ve been to the Holocaust museum in Israel. The Nazis kept detailed records of every name and I saw my mother’s name at 14, listed as one of the passengers on the train.”

End quote

Wait a minute! His mother was 14, but she was not sent to the gas chamber? Only children 15 and older were allowed to live. Obviously, she lied about her age. One of the Sonderkommano men, who was standing beside the train, probably told her to lie about her age and say that she was 15, not 14.

To which gas chamber was his grandmother sent?

Gas chamber at Auschwitz-Birkeanu

Gas chamber number IV at Auschwitz-Birkenau

Gas chamber at Auschwitz-Birkenau

Gas chamber number III at Auschwitz-Birkenau

How cruel the Nazis were! To let a 14 year girl live, so that she could watch as her mother walked to her death!

But how did she know that her mother was walking into a gas chamber?

Birkenau was a 425 acre site, but the gas chambers could be seen from the trains, as the Jews arrived.  Especially gas chamber number III which was very near the tracks. This is the same gas chamber from which Irene Zisblatt was saved when a young boy threw her over the fence and into an open train car on the tracks.

So we have proof that the mother of Gene Simmons was on a train that arrived at Auschwitz-Birkenau. What is the proof that she was gassed?

One would think that the Nazis would have tried to keep the gassing of the Jews a secret. But No! They were too stupid to put the gas chambers out of sight.

June 13, 2016

an oldie but goody: the real story of World War II

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 10:02 am
American soldiers in World War II

American soldiers in World War II

You can read an excellent article about World War II at http://www.ihr.org/other/july09weber.html

This was written by Mark Weber, who says that he is Jewish. I have personally heard him say that he is a Jew.

Here is a short quote from the article:

One recent and particularly useful overview [of the aftermath of World War II] is a 615-page book, published in 2007, entitled After the Reich: The Brutal History of the Allied Occupation. / 3 In it, British historian Giles MacDonogh details how the ruined and prostrate German Reich (including Austria) was systematically raped and robbed, and how many Germans who survived the war were either killed in cold blood or deliberately left to die of disease, cold, malnutrition or starvation. He explains how some three million Germans died unnecessarily after the official end of hostilities — about two million civilians, mostly women, children and elderly, and about one million prisoners of war.

End quote

 

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