Scrapbookpages Blog

July 16, 2017

Girls und Panzer — Panzerlied

Filed under: Germany, Music, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 2:18 pm

July 11, 2017

What does Nazi mean in German?

Filed under: Germany, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 12:10 pm

Herbert Stolpmann, a heck of a nice guy, and also an outstanding commentator on my blog, gave the best answer to this question, in my opinion. He gave an answer in these three comments, which I have taken the liberty of re-ordering and combining into a single statement.

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/06/27/german-vocabulary-word-of-the-day-scheishaufen/#comment-81041

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/06/27/german-vocabulary-word-of-the-day-scheishaufen/#comment-81005

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/06/27/german-vocabulary-word-of-the-day-scheishaufen/#comment-80991

Herbert Stolpmann wrote on June 30th, 2017:

Begin quote

Under the Hitler regime if you called me a Nazi, you would finish up in Dachau as a communist. I doubt that you would ever come out alive…

Americans in general seem to have little perception of the meaning; ‘Nazis’

The expression ‘Nazi’ was originally coined as the battle cry of communist elements in the post-war period of WW I.

Myself and the majority of German people followed the emergence of National Socialism under Hitler and had their support until the outbreak of war, but were never a member of the NSDAP or any sister organization thereof, whom you claim to be a Nazis in your option, although in most professions unless you persued a career, you had no choice but loin [to join] the NSDAP.

Myself and the many millions like me considered themselves Germans first and [willing to] die if necessary for your [our] country but never as Nazis or being abused nor described as such.

Those I sent at the end of the war to their deaths, their spirits haunt me in the early morning waking hours to this day…

Something I personally dislike by any commentator [is] to bring up the subject of those mean old Nazis, to me.

I am sure it is offensive to say the least to other native speaking Germans that took part in combat action especially towards the end of the war.

You will find that at present, no German politician will ever utter or use the expression ‘Nazis’. Even the Russians use the expression Hitlerites To me and those others that went through the last stages of the war I mentioned before it is hurtful.
My main-function as a so called ‘Hilfsausbilder’ (Assistant Instructor) at the age seventeen, was to train Volkssturm -men that were my grandfather’s age in the use of a Panzerfaust in an effort to stop American Armour.
I did deploy them as good as I could, but they had only one chance: A direct hit at an oncoming tank or Half Track vehicle.

It was very rarely that I ever saw any that I had deployed and an entire Brigade was decimated south of Remagen.

There was hardly a single NAZI among them, they just obeyed a seventeen old youngster for the glory of the Reich and the final victory!
I am now 89 years old till [still] living a comfortable life, yet I have a guilty conscience that haunts me.

To see comments you and others publish are of interest to me and many others of the same background, but [to refer to a German Wehrmacht soldier] as a Nazi [is] a gross insult.

End outstanding comments by Stolpmann

Quora has seven answers to this question, but essentially there is a lot of agreement with Stolpmann.

https://www.quora.com/What-does-Nazi-mean-in-German

Here are a few quotes from the seven answers given on that site [Quora].

Begin quote from top answer:

The word “Nazi” is an abbreviation for the word “Nationalsozialist”.

The full name of the political party was the “Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei” – the National Socialist German Worker’s Party.

It’s worth noting that, within Germany at the time, the word “Nazi” was a homnym for “Naczi” which was an insulting term for a “foolish clumsy person”, so the term wasn’t actually used by the Nazi’s to describe themselves…..

Indeed, after 1932, the term “national socialist” was banned in the USSR, and Russian texts had to refer to them as “fascists”, because the Kremlin didn’t like the taint on the word “socialist” that had come about as a result of that party’s use of the word in their name.

End quote from top Quora answer

Begin Quora quote from John Gordon who taught English in Germany:

In German the term Nazi is a noun only (not as adjective) and originated as a mildly hostile nickname for members and supporters of the NSDAP. It seems to have been coined by analogy with Sozi which was a mildly hostile nickname for a socialist. In German, both terms refer to people only, not to ideologies or to the Party.

The Nazis themselves didn’t like the word Nazi. Originally, the Nazis were a Bavarian party and in some dialects in Southern Bavaria Nazi is a familiar version of Ignaz. At the same time – again only in some Bavarian dialects, it was a colloquial term for buffoon, clumsy fellow.

End quote from John Gordon

Begin quote from Quora

Nazi was an insult — meaning fool.

It has been used as an insult too for Hitler’s NSDAP. With time, people forgot it was an insult and thought that it meant National Socialist.

The 24th edition of Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache (2002) says the word Nazi was favored in southern Germany (supposedly from c. 1924) among opponents of National Socialism because the nickname Nazi, Naczi (from the masc. proper name Ignatz, German form of Ignatius) was used colloquially to mean “a foolish person, clumsy or awkward person.” Ignatz was a popular name in Catholic Austria, and according to one source in World War I Nazi was a generic name in the German Empire for the soldiers of Austria-Hungary.

End quote from Quora

July 10, 2017

Auferstanden aus Ruinen

Filed under: Germany, Language, Music, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 4:27 pm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auferstanden_aus_Ruinen

https://www.quora.com/Should-Auferstanden-Aus-Ruinen-be-the-song-of-the-President-of-Germany

I like this rendition of the song.  Unfortunately, I have not been able find a version with both English and German subtitles.  This version has no subtitles at all, but I really liked the black and white historical video that accompanies the song.

July 9, 2017

SS marschiert in Freindesland

This version above has both English and German subtitles! It also features modern CGI graphics clips from Girls und Panzer.

The version below has German subtitles plus subtitles in some other language. I believe it is Spanish.  Some may prefer the more classic WW2 black and white footage that accompanies the music.  Both videos have the exact same sound track.

 

You can read more about this song on Wikipedia, including a translation of the words into English.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devil%27s_song

Or you can vote in the comments on which rendition you like?

 

July 5, 2017

Ich hatt’ einen Kameraden

Filed under: Germany, Language, Music, World War II — furtherglory @ 2:29 pm

July 4, 2017

1,000 Jewish Holocaust survivors want compensation from Germany

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized, World War II — furtherglory @ 12:05 pm

Bodies of Jews murdered by Germans

Will Germany keep on paying the survivors of the Holocaust until the end of time? Yes, I think that this is what is happening. The Germans don’t mind. They love Jews now. Millions of Jews are now back in Germany, which they think is their home country.

In this recent news article, you can read about current claims being made by Romanian Jews: http://www.nbcnews.com/nightly-news/death-train-will-germany-finally-pay-holocaust-survivors-iasi-n778336

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

IASI, Romania – Over the past 65 years, the German government has paid more than $70 billion in reparations to Jewish survivors of the Holocaust.

The Germans, however, have refused to pay one small group of Jews who survived a massacre in this city near Romania’s eastern border.

Holocaust survivor who looks a lot like me

The woman in the photo could be me. That’s what I look like now, although I am not that fat. Maybe I could claim to be a Holocaust survivor and get some money from Germany.

This quote is also from the news article:

Begin quote

Jewish residents of Iasi, Romania were murdered in the streets in June 1941 after the start of the German-Soviet war. Survivors of the initial massacre were loaded onto trains, where most died of heat and overcrowding. Radu Ioanid / via The Iasi Pogrom

Next week German officials will meet with representatives from the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, which represents about 1,000 Jewish Iasi survivors in Berlin to negotiate potential compensation.

The German government told NBC News that, in general, it plans to help Holocaust victims “even more effectively with funding … that will increase next year.”

End quote

George Herscu survived the Iasi massacre by hiding in a cornfield. His father Joseph died aboard a train. NBC News

Jewish residents of Iasi, Romania were murdered in the streets in June 1941 after the start of the German-Soviet war. Survivors of the initial massacre were loaded onto trains, where most died of heat and overcrowding. Radu Ioanid / via The Iasi Pogrom

 

July 3, 2017

Das Panzerlied [German song]

Filed under: Germany, Music, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 12:46 pm

I love the rendition above because it has both English and German subtitles and uses footage from a number of American movies, including the classic 1965 Battle of the Bulge and Saving Private Ryan.

A few days back, I had a “Name That Tune” contest with another version of this song. I am announcing the winner of the last Name that Tune contest!  It is Hermie!  He is one of the best commenters on my blog.

Here is the winning comment in the Name that Tune contest:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/06/30/name-that-tune/#comment-81103

Ursula Haverbeck

Filed under: Auschwitz, Germany, Holocaust, Language, True Crime, World War II — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 7:54 am

The above Video is about Ursula Haverbeck.  Much of it is in German with English subtitles.

[Her name is also spelled as Ursala.]

The video is around 10 minutes in length; it is a little bit too long, so  I have made a link to 2 minutes and 13 seconds into the video, where Ursula actually starts speaking German with English subtitles.

Visit her German Language web site: http://ursula-haverbeck.info/

This blog post was inspired by a comment to my article “Old Ladies Don’t Blog or do they?” 

I have written two previous blog posts about Ursula Haverbeck getting into trouble with the law:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2015/11/13/87-year-old-ursula-haverbeck-convicted-of-holocaust-denial-in-germany/

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2015/06/09/holocaust-denier-ursala-haverbeck-in-trouble-again-in-germany/

July 2, 2017

Displaced Persons [DPs] then and now

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 11:03 am

As I have mentioned many times, I spent 20 months living in Germany after World War II. My husband was an Army officer. The Army wives lived on the Army base and rarely interacted with the German people.

My husband wanted to “live on the economy” meaning that he wanted to live in a German house, not on the Army base. He wanted to meet the German people and interact with them, so he had rented the upstairs rooms in a German house before I arrived.

As soon as I arrived in Germany, I was taken to the German house, that my husband had rented, and left there all alone while my husband continued doing soldier stuff. Of course, I started crying immediately. My German land lord immediately bounded up the steps and brought me some wine. He spoke to me very soothingly, but I couldn’t understand a word that he said.

Minutes later, two scruffy looking DPs came up the stairs and knocked on my door. They asked me if they could have the cigarette butts from my ash tray. I assumed that they were going to smoke these cigarette butts, and I didn’t want them to do that, so I handed each of them a carton of cigarettes, and they left.

When my landlord saw them leaving with the cigarette cartons, he came running up the stairs, screaming at me not to give these people anything — because they were DPs.  I said “What’s a DP?”

That was my introduction to the aftermath of war and the people who were displaced by war.

I recently posted a video about displaced persons, which you can see by following the link below:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/07/01/video-germany-45-the-other-story-part-1-east-prussia/

I also wrote about the DPs, in the context of the Dachau camp, on my website at

https://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/KZDachau/DachauLife01E.htm

The photo below shows a display in the Dachau museum.

Display about the refugee camp at Dachau

The photo above shows information in the Dachau Museum about the Dachau refugee camp which housed ethnic Germans who had been expelled from the Sudetenland in what is now the Czech Republic, after World War II ended. Many of the “expellees” from the Sudetenland settled in Bavaria where Dachau is located. One of the streets near the former Dachau camp is named Sudetenland Strasse.

Unless visitors spend a lot of time in the Museum at the Dachau Memorial Site, they will probably leave without learning that Dachau was a refugee camp for Volksdeutsche (ethnic Germans) longer than it was a concentration camp. Even then, visitors are likely to be confused about who the refugees were.

Some guides at Dachau tell visitors that the refugees were people from the Soviet Union or Russia who were fleeing Communism, although they were actually Germans who were the victims of ethnic cleansing after German land in East Prussia, eastern Pomerania, eastern Brandenburg and Silesia was given to Poland, and the Sudetenland in the former Czechoslovakia was given to the newly formed Czech Republic.

A total of 9,575,000 ethnic Germans were expelled from the eastern territories of Germany and 3,477,000 were expelled from Czechoslovakia in 1945 and 1946. An additional 1,371,000 ethnic Germans were expelled from Poland. Altogether, a total of 17,658,000 Volksdeutsche were expelled from their homelands and forced to flee to Germany, which was about the size of the state of Wisconsin after World War II. (Source: A Terrible Revenge by Alfred-Maurice de Zayas)

This building was a restaurant for the refugees at Dachau. It was torn down years ago.

The photograph above shows an old building that was used for disinfecting the clothing at Dachau. Before it was torn down, this building was used as a restaurant when the Dachau camp was a refugee camp for Germans who had been expelled from the Sudetenland in what is now the Czech Republic after the war. It was torn down in 1965 to make room for a Memorial Site. The location of the building is where the Jewish Memorial building now stands.

In her book entitled “The High Cost of Vengence,” Freda Utley wrote the following in a Chapter entitled “Our Crimes Against Humanity”:

The Poles, who were given possession of the territory “east of the Oder-Neisse line,” drove out the inhabitants with the utmost brutality, throwing women and children, the aged and the sick, out of their homes with only a few hours’ notice, and not sparing even those in hospitals and orphanages.

The Czechs, no less brutal, drove the Germans over the mountains on foot, and at the frontier stole such belongings as they had been able to carry. Having an eye for profit as well as revenge, the Czechs held thousands of German men as slave laborers while driving out their wives and children.

Many of the old, the young, and the sick died of hunger or cold or exposure on the long march into what remained of Germany, or perished of hunger and thirst and disease in the crowded cattle cars in which some of the refugees were transported. Those who survived the journey were thrust upon the slender resources of starving occupied Germany. No one of German race was allowed any help by the United Nations. The displaced-persons camps were closed to them and first the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA) and then the International Refugee Organization (IRO) was forbidden to succor them. The new untouchables were thrown into Germany to die, or survive as paupers in the miserable accommodations which the bombed-out cities of Germany could provide for those even more wretched than their original inhabitants.

How many people were killed or died will never be known. Out of a total of twelve to thirteen million people who had committed the crime of belonging to the German race, four or five million are unaccounted for. But no one knows how many are dead and how many are slave laborers. Only one thing is certain : Hitler’s barbaric liquidation of the Jews has been outmatched by the liquidation of Germans by the “democratic, peace-loving” powers of the United Nations.

As the Welsh minister, Dr. Elfan Rees, head of the refugee division of the World Council of Churches, said in a sermon delivered at Geneva University on March 13, 1949 : “More people have been rendered homeless by an Allied peace than by a Nazi war.”

The estimate of the number of German expellees, or flüchtlinge as the Germans call them, in Rump Germany is now eight or nine million. The International Refugee Organization (IRO) takes no account of them, and was expressly forbidden by act of Congress to give them any aid. It is obviously impossible for densely over-crowded Western Germany to provide for them. A few have been absorbed into industry or are working on German farms, but for the most part they are living in subhuman conditions without hope of acquiring homes or jobs.

The photos below show reconstructed barracks buildings at the former Dachau camp.

Two reconstructed barracks at Dachau

Door into reconstructed barracks at Dachau

 

July 1, 2017

East Prussia – The last Winter

Filed under: Germany, Music, World War II — furtherglory @ 10:23 am

I like the German background music in this video.  It is only 4 minutes long; have a listen.

Published on Jul 19, 2013

The First East Prussian Offensive took place from 16–27 October 1944, and was carried out by the 3rd Belorussian Front under General I.D. Chernyakhovsky as part of the Memel Offensive of the 1st Baltic Front. The Soviet forces took heavy casualties while penetrating 30–60 km (19–37 miles) into East Prussia and Poland, and the offensive was postponed until greater reserves could be gathered.
The 2nd East Prussian Offensive lasted from 13 January to 25 April 1945, though some German units did not surrender until 9 May. The Battle of Königsberg was a major part of the offensive, which ended in victory for the Red Army.

  • Music

    • “Peer Gynt Suite: No.1, Op. 46: II. Aase`s Death” by Münchner Symphoniker
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